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Discussion Starter · #42 ·
I think we’ve given you enough technical detail to get well started. Load up on 2x4’s, 1x4’s and some carpenter shims and wedges. You can use this wood for cribbing to get your set ups and angles figured out. The cool way would be to buy a plastic dummy mock-up engine but they are pretty pricy so your going to have to use the old techniques of cribbing the setup to get your final dimensions for mounts, clearances, etc.

Bogie
thanks for all the help, ive given it some thought and im just going to bite the bullet and drive 2 hours away to get an original mustang 289. Might aswell, and most likely going to put some performance parts on the thing, but again. Thanks for all the help man.
 

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'23 T-Bucket Pickup
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Sadly I don't have a 289 available. Besides I really love the chevy 350's reliability and power. Also the time and money ive put into this id love to see it in the stang.
WAAAY back in 1968 ( when I was 16 ), I knew a guy a couple years older, who put a Chevy 327 built to 365 HP, in a 65 Mustang.. Same block as a 350.. It had a 4 speed and was the fastest car in the county. So I know this can be done. It may take a year working on it after school, but you'll be thrilled with the results.
 

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Discussion Starter · #44 ·
WAAAY back in 1968 ( when I was 16 ), I knew a guy a couple years older, who put a Chevy 327 built to 365 HP, in a 65 Mustang.. Same block as a 350.. It had a 4 speed and was the fastest car in the county. So I know this can be done. It may take a year working on it after school, but you'll be thrilled with the results.
Yea, but right now i'm just going to find a 289. I love the results I would get but i just don't feel like I can do it. A 289 is really my best option. And besides. The I wont be getting beat by both chevy and ford guys about the 350 in the mustang as well as I can put some edelbrock parts on the 289 to make it more powerful than the stock engine was. I'm also going to put a performance exhaust on it and I don't want to have to mix and match parts off a 350 performance exhaust and a 289 exhaust. It'll also make it easier to get a wiring harness so I don't have to adapt a wiring harness. Someday I hope to get a 350 and drop it in another car but right now I'm going to sell the 350. What do you think would be a good price for it? I was thinking somewhere near 4000 because it does have some performance parts and I did rebuild it. It would have the transmission as well
 

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Discussion Starter · #45 ·
Yea, but right now i'm just going to find a 289. I love the results I would get but i just don't feel like I can do it. A 289 is really my best option. And besides. The I wont be getting beat by both chevy and ford guys about the 350 in the mustang as well as I can put some edelbrock parts on the 289 to make it more powerful than the stock engine was. I'm also going to put a performance exhaust on it and I don't want to have to mix and match parts off a 350 performance exhaust and a 289 exhaust. It'll also make it easier to get a wiring harness so I don't have to adapt a wiring harness. Someday I hope to get a 350 and drop it in another car but right now I'm going to sell the 350. What do you think would be a good price for it? I was thinking somewhere near 4000 because it does have some performance parts and I did rebuild it. It would have the transmission as well
and If I did do it I could do the welding after school but i would have to adapt a lot of the mounts. I am buying a 68 mustang that was wrecked to use the parts off of it.
 

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thanks for all the help, ive given it some thought and im just going to bite the bullet and drive 2 hours away to get an original mustang 289. Might aswell, and most likely going to put some performance parts on the thing, but again. Thanks for all the help man.
You should be able to sell the 350 and trans to recoup what you've put into it. If it had an automatic, look for a C4 transmission to fit with no modifications needed.. Also a word of caution: the converter ALWAYS goes on the transmission first before installing. Use a straight edge and a ruler to make sure the converter is seated completely onto the transmission input shaft. A few years ago, I rebuilt a 727 transmission for a friend and painstakingly seated the converter and retained it with a couple of straps, only to have a shade tree mechanic take the converter off and bolt it to the flexplate first. Totally fried the transmission. The shade tree guy told my friend that he always installs them that way.. It was most likely his first, or he had destroyed transmissions.
 

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Discussion Starter · #47 ·
You should be able to sell the 350 and trans to recoup what you've put into it. If it had an automatic, look for a C4 transmission to fit with no modifications needed.. Also a word of caution: the converter ALWAYS goes on the transmission first before installing. Use a straight edge and a ruler to make sure the converter is seated completely onto the transmission input shaft. A few years ago, I rebuilt a 727 transmission for a friend and painstakingly seated the converter and retained it with a couple of straps, only to have a shade tree mechanic take the converter off and bolt it to the flexplate first. Totally fried the transmission. The shade tree guy told my friend that he always installs them that way.. It was most likely his first, or he had destroyed transmissions.
Ive only put about 6-700 into this engine tbh. The engine for 300 and tranny for 200. + the rebuild kit for bout 125 and the oil pump and what-not. So if I sold for 4k then I would have a lot more money then I put into it. Thanks for the info bout the tranny btw
 

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Yea, but right now i'm just going to find a 289. I love the results I would get but i just don't feel like I can do it. A 289 is really my best option. And besides. The I wont be getting beat by both chevy and ford guys about the 350 in the mustang as well as I can put some edelbrock parts on the 289 to make it more powerful than the stock engine was. I'm also going to put a performance exhaust on it and I don't want to have to mix and match parts off a 350 performance exhaust and a 289 exhaust. It'll also make it easier to get a wiring harness so I don't have to adapt a wiring harness. Someday I hope to get a 350 and drop it in another car but right now I'm going to sell the 350. What do you think would be a good price for it? I was thinking somewhere near 4000 because it does have some performance parts and I did rebuild it. It would have the transmission as well
If you were a professional engine builder and offered a warranty with the engine, you could get some good money for the engine and transmission. As is, I personally think that $1500 is the best that I would expect to get for the setup. The market in your area may bear more $$. Hoping that others will comment.
 

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Ive only put about 6-700 into this engine tbh. The engine for 300 and tranny for 200. + the rebuild kit for bout 125 and the oil pump and what-not. So if I sold for 4k then I would have a lot more money then I put into it. Thanks for the info bout the tranny btw
FWIW the 289, the 302, and the 351 Windsor are all based on the same small block Ford. Any would fit without modifications. The 351 Cleveland and 351M are bigger engines. If you can find a 351 Windsor you can expect better power and torque than with a 289.
 

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Discussion Starter · #51 ·
FWIW the 289, the 302, and the 351 Windsor are all based on the same small block Ford. Any would fit without modifications. The 351 Cleveland and 351M are bigger engines. If you can find a 351 Windsor you can expect better power and torque than with a 289.
Ill look for one. My brother , strongly, discouraged me from the 351 windsor for some reason
 

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Discussion Starter · #56 ·
A buddy had a 351W in a Cougar way back and it went real good. You won't be disappointed.
Well he said its really bad on gas mileage. But 12 to the gallon is kinda good tho.

Seems the 221, 260 had 2 core plugs on the block side and 289 had 3.
some called them freeze or soft plugs.
Good to know, might go for a 302 or 351 even though
 

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347 kit and GTP or aftermarket head’s, yes a 347 stroke will go into a 289 block. Better head’s and attention to squish/quench clearance at .035 to .040 a shorter duration cam with lots of lift is what is needed with modern fuels for power and mileage. Edelbrock AVS II around 600 CFM will deliver better MPG than the Ford style carb.

You can not bore a 221 or 260 to make a 289, 302 or 347

Bogie
 

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347 kit and GTP or aftermarket head’s, yes a 347 stroke will go into a 289 block. Better head’s and attention to squish/quench clearance at .035 to .040 a shorter duration cam with lots of lift is what is needed with modern fuels for power and mileage. Edelbrock AVS II around 600 CFM will deliver better MPG than the Ford style carb.

You can not bore a 221 or 260 to make a 289, 302 or 347

Bogie
The old motorcraft carbs were horrible on gas. The jetting and/or metering rods on the primary venturies are a major determining factor in fuel mileage. I’ve seen it proven many times that better fuel mileage can be obtained with a 4 bbl versus a 2 bbl carburetor. Ford had a habit of putting big 2 bbl carbs with huge jetting on 351 V8s. I gained 3mpg on my 75 Nova SS with 350 by changing out the factory 2 bbl Rochester in favor of a Quadrajet and factory manifold from a 327 275 hp. Performance increase was like shifting into passing gear. Btw. Car cam with factory 3 on the floor. It also got headers when the factory 12,000 mile warranty warranty expired. I’d get 24 mpg on the interstate running 70 mph.
 
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