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You gotta stop watching so much YouTube. Lotta bs on there. You got lots of time.
‘Loosen all the bolts so the pan is able to move if needed. Then if the bolts won’t screw in easily you might need to file or grind a slight taper on the bolt. They’ll self-centre with a taper and screw right in.
However if you’ve used any silicone sealer on the pan, block or gasket you need to pull the pan right away before the silicone dries. You might save the gasket that way.
you should test fit the pan without the gasket to make sure all the bolts line up.
 

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I got the oil pan on and all bolts in except the last two back bolts that are near the rear main seal...I can't get them to start for anything, I've tried since 11:30 this morning...hopefully it doesn't leak too bad.

If it should, will it do so when I prime the oil pump with the drill ?
You realize the 2 front and 2 rear pan bolts are different size than the others. 1/2" heads 5/16 18 thread. The others are 7/16 head 1/4 20 thread.
I got the oil pan on and all bolts in except the last two back bolts that are near the rear main seal...I can't get them to start for anything, I've tried since 11:30 this morning...hopefully it doesn't leak too bad.

If it should, will it do so when I prime the oil pump with the drill ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #285 ·
You gotta stop watching so much YouTube. Lotta bs on there. You got lots of time.
‘Loosen all the bolts so the pan is able to move if needed. Then if the bolts won’t screw in easily you might need to file or grind a slight taper on the bolt. They’ll self-centre with a taper and screw right in.
However if you’ve used any silicone sealer on the pan, block or gasket you need to pull the pan right away before the silicone dries. You might save the gasket that way.
you should test fit the pan without the gasket to make sure all the bolts line up.
I got those oil pan gasket tabs on with no problem, but the rear main seals just won't start...I think the holes aren't lined up right there..

I'll remove the pan once more, either start with the front and rear bolts then the smaller bolts or install the tabs in the rear main seal bolts and get every thing else snugged down to the engine block to make sure the rear main seal holes are lined up with the bolt holes...only issue I had the first time using the tabs was they did'nt want to come down while everything else was snugged down...probably put them in too tight, but once i unsnugged everything else they came out with effort, damaging them a bit.

I'm going to go out there once more today to get this oil pan, oil filter, and starter on before this next wave of cold weather comes in this Saturday.
 

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You are probably right about a break and working frustrated, but I'm worried about the cam sitting too long before break in.

The video I watched on Youtube, the guy scientificly tested all the major camshaft lubes...the stuff I used won in all tests, but one test stuck out...he let each brand sit on the camshaft lobes individually for 7 days. The stuff I used stayed on its lobe and didn't lose its quality after 7 whole days...

So I know I have 7 days at least, but I may have a bit longer.
Doesn’t matter how long the cam sits as long as you used a good sticky cam lube on lobes and lifter feet. Moly assembly lube like Isky Rev-Lube. Moly lubes provide excellent protection for these parts but is not used passed break in because molybdenum likes itself so once ground to a fine powder suspended in a grease or heavy oil in use with in an operating engine diluted in engine oil the fine powder starts to aggregate into globs big enough for the filter to capture, thusly it is removed over time. It’s a great EP lube so a lot of money, sweat, blood and tears have been poured into finding ways to overcome this but all have come to naught so it isn’t used as a long time Extreme Pressure lube in engine oil. It is found in certain types of bearing greases.

Youre going to have to find away to get those corner bolts in, they shouldn’t be a problem, this is telling you the pan is probably distorted from life long impacts. Inside a running engine around the crankcase the oil looks like an explosion it will get out if the pan and timing cover are not tight. Keep in mind that manufactures are extremely cost conscious there would not be a bolt used that isn’t absolutely necessary.

Bogie
 

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There are a couple of tabs molded into and sticking out of the one piece gasket that fits into the two outer edges of the rear main cap. Are you getting these into place before installing the pan? Easy if the engine is out and upside down on a stand. It imperative that these are in place correctly before pan goes on or it will leak horribly. Not so easy with engine in car. Probably easier with a 4-piece pan gasket set, as this is a separate seal. You did take out the old seal that goes across the rear main cap, correct?

Sent from my moto g power using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter · #291 ·
No, I thought I was supposed to leave in the bottom half of the 2 piece rear main seal when installing the one piece gasket ?
Summit only shows 2 piece rear main seals for 1984 MC and Gen 1 '83-84 306 sbc...

I assume by my year of car and year from engine block casting numbers near the backside drivers head.
 

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No, I thought I was supposed to leave in the bottom half of the 2 piece rear main seal when installing the one piece gasket ?
OK I'm quite sure that's the problem. Hope the pan isn't bent up too bad from tightening the side rail bolts.

That's not part of the 2-piece rear main seal every one talks about. I would call it the rear pan gasket seal. Just a sec and I'll look up a photo so you can ID for certain. If it is still in place, it will need to be removed for the new 1-piece gasket to work.
 

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There are four seals in this listing. The seal I am talking about is the small one on the left. It needs removed because it is already molded into a one-piece pan gasket.
I think you are stacking them on top of one another.
https://www.summitracing.com/parts/fel-1803

As far as the 2-piece rear main seal.... it is completely contained within the rear main bearing cap/engine block. You would have to take out the big 5/8" head bolts on the rear main cap to get the bottom 1/2 of it out. The crankshaft itself turns inside of the two halves of this seal and it seals directly on the crankshaft - it is round and split into two pieces (hence the term 2-piece rear main seal).
 

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Discussion Starter · #296 ·
There are four seals in this listing. The seal I am talking about is the small one on the left. It needs removed because it is already molded into a one-piece pan gasket.
I think you are stacking them on top of one another.
https://www.summitracing.com/parts/fel-1803

As far as the 2-piece rear main seal.... it is completely contained underneath the rear main bearing cap. You would have to take out the big 5/8" heads bolts to get the bottom 1/2 of it out. The crankshaft itself turns inside of the two halves of this seal.
Yes, that makes all the sense !
 

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Let’s clarify what’s a seal and what’s a gasket. The seals are in contact with the crankshaft the front is a one piece in a metal frame that is pressed into the front cover it actually rides on the damper boss. The rear main for this engine is a two piece that is within the main cap you can’t see it without removing the rear main bearing cap.

The gasket for the pan to block closes the pan along the length of the engine and side to side at the front timing cover and the rear main cap. All of it is visible with the pan removed. This can be a 4 piece gasket with 2 long sides for the length of the engine and 2 half moon pieces for over the bottom lip of tge timing cover and the rear main cap or it can be a one piece gasket that molds all of these elements of length and width together. The one piece can be found for the 1976-1985 engine with the two piece rear crank seal with another version that fits 1986 and up engines with the one piece rear crank seal. The one piece gasket is different for the older two piece rear seal to that used by the one piece rear seal engines, this also applies to oil pans not interchanging across this seat type divide. The 1955 through 1975 is also a two piece rear main crank seal but uses a thinner thickness gasket at the timing cover than the 76-85 pan gasket set. Often the 4 piece gasket set includes both the thinner 55-75 and the thicker 76-85 timing cover chin gasket.

Installation of the pan gasket set whether the 1 or 4 piece set requires removal of all the gaskets that close off the pan to block rails, over the rear main and from the chin of the timing cover.

Keep in mind that hardware store RTV does not resist oil or fuel for that matter. If using RTV it must be Permatex and it must say oil resistant or oil proof on the label.

An aside but something you have to watch for is the dip stick moves from the left side to the right of the block. You have to pay attention to this when buying pan gaskets.

Don't expect help from the parts store clerk unless it’s some old guy that’s been in the business forever. The young guys only know what the computer has to display, if you get off their data base your most likely on your own. Therefore, you need to do your homework which once again leads to buying books on the subject. As I said before, there is tons of great info out there that didn’t exist in the public domain when I was young. What you need is Ed Staffel’s “Chevrolet Small Block, Parts Interchange Manual” this lets you get armed with info before you go shopping.

Bogie
 

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Be sure to stop and give us a chance for further input before you begin trying to adjust valves. Don't pound the balancer on or try to pull it in place with the bolt - use an installation tool.

Also I'm fairly concerned about your trying to pull the balancer off with that 3-claw puller on the outer ring. Did that puller ever get a good bite on the balancer ring or did it just slip right off when you tried it? It is mounted in rubber and can get damaged fairly easily. What about first time that you did timing gears? What did you use then? Don't pound the balancer on with a hammer (beats up the thrust bearing) or try to pull it in place with the bolt (often strips threads in the crankshaft snout) - use an installation tool (loaner) from Autozone or wherever.
 

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Discussion Starter · #300 ·
Be sure to stop and give us a chance for further input before you begin trying to adjust valves. Don't pound the balancer on or try to pull it in place with the bolt - use an installation tool.

Also I'm fairly concerned about your trying to pull the balancer off with that 3-claw puller on the outer ring. Did that puller ever get a good bite on the balancer ring or did it just slip right off when you tried it? It is mounted in rubber and can get damaged fairly easily. What about first time that you did timing gears? What did you use then? Don't pound the balancer on with a hammer (beats up the thrust bearing) or try to pull it in place with the bolt (often strips threads in the crankshaft snout) - use an installation tool (loaner) from Autozone or wherever.
I won't, I bought the sbc installation tool from Amazon...
 
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