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1969 Mustang Coupe Project Car
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1,270 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all::
I've got a question, I've been installing the Vintage Air brackets on the Mustang so far I really like how heavy duty they are. There is one issue that I'm facing is the power steering pump bracket has no tension adjustment at all, and the Sanderson compressor bracket is where the belt for the power steering and the air conditioning get their tension from. The problem is l I want to run the engine to make sure all the belts are tracking correctly before I finish the air install. So can I put the Sanderson on the bracket and run it without damaging the pump? So if the clutch isn't engaged on the pump wont it act like a idler pulley?
Thanks
Mark
 

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279 Posts
Leave the clutch disconnected until you are ready to charge the AC system. Won't hurt to run it that way at all. No different than when you are running around with the AC off.

I'll be running my Holley system the same way. I won't charge the AC until I'm sure there are no issues with the engine. Until then, the compressor is just along for the ride.
 

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1969 Mustang Coupe Project Car
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1,270 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the replay, that's great, the pumps are not that expensive so I might buy the same type that will come with the Vintage Air and use this one as a spare once the kit gets here. I've been power coating the Vintage Air brackets since they come in raw steel but I didn't realize I needed the compressor bracket to mount the alternator. I'm wondering if I should add an idler pulley to get get more belt around the power steering pump. BTW is there a general rule of thumb for how much offset a V belt can have before there is an issue with it not staying on the pulley? I had to slightly mod the alternator bracket to get it to line up properly?
617428

Thanks again
Mark
 

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1969 Mustang Coupe Project Car
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1,270 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
OK I'm bummed the new compressor arrived today and as I unpacked it I noticed this damage
617491

617492


I guess I'm going to try and contact the vendor and see if they will replace it. If not do you think I could open the hold back up without breaking the aluminum. I thought about running a rod through the back since it's still round to see if I could nudge it open a little more to get the bolt to fit. I'm not familiar with these compressors but IF I can turn it 90 degrees and use the hose connections sideways it would fit.
Thanks
Mark
 

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Rod...from a Chrysler?
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5,982 Posts
It's already broken. I see a crack. It can still bolt up with a piece missing, just ugly.
If you're stuck with it, don't nudge, try filing it out. The piece may stay in place.
 

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2,804 Posts
I’ve got a Sanden mounted on Vintage brackets on my SBC, and that hole is where the tensioner bolt goes. Even if a small piece breaks out when you try to open the hole, I think it would clamp down on the remaining area of the tab and hold tension. If they won’t replace it, maybe they will give you a partial credit for a damaged item.
 

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1969 Mustang Coupe Project Car
Joined
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1,270 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks you guys, I took a closer look and the back side has a major crack. I've been trying to get in touch with the vendor but so far they have been unresponsive. I could order a new one but I'd rather spend money elsewhere. I have some stuff called Alum Bond that can be drilled and threaded when it sets:
Here is the specs.
A two-component epoxy formula highly concentrated with carefully selected pure aluminum particles, modified curing agents and special high quality additives to provide maximum strength, durability and ease of application. Alumbond is aluminum filled epoxy specially formulated for repairing condenser coils, tanks, valves, pumps, castings, water jackets, radiators, etc., where non-rusting, non-magnetic aluminum finish is desired.


PHYSICAL PROPERTIES:


  • Hardness (Shore, ASTM D 1706): 83D
  • Coefficient of Thermal Expansion: 40 x 10-6 cm/cm/˚C
  • Compression Strength (ASTM D 695): 8600 psi (59 M Pa)
  • Tensile Strength (ASTM D 638): 3500 psi (24 M Pa)
  • Maximum Line Pressure (after 5 hours application time): 650 psi
Automotive lighting Automotive tire Alloy wheel Hood Audio equipment


If I round it back out there won't be much left on the top. But as guys have said it where the bolt supplies tension to hold the unit in place. Thanks for the input everyone. I'm going to wait to see if they get back to me before I go crazy with the dremel. I have pulleys to sand blast and powder coat anyway.
Thanks again
Mark
 

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More for Less Racer
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20,931 Posts
You could also make yourself up a custom stainless washer/load spreader plate to distributed the bolt force over more of the remaining tab....kind of like a valvecover bolt load spreader.
 

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Race it, Don't rice it!
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8,819 Posts
The right way to fix that is TIG it and recut the hole.
If TIG isn't an option, Aluma weld Brazing and recutting the hole will also work.
If brazing isn't and option either, a plate front and back would also most likely be fine. Even better if it could be drilled and pinned.
A sleeve insert would likely get it dome as well.
 
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