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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a basic question below, here's some background.

Installed vintage air in my 29 model A coupe.
Made and crimped all the hoses per instructions that came with crimper.

When I charged it up, it worked great.
I'm kicking myself for not testing how long it would hold a vaccum before charging, just vacuumed it down and charged it.

Once charged, the sight glass on the drier was running clear, but after one week sitting without being operated, now its streaming bubbles when running and compressor keeps cycling off, seemingly indicating that I'm loosing charge. (It is still blowing cold air)

I have a UV leak detection kit that I bought for another car but never used because the leak on that car ended up being obvious hole in the condenser.

I bought some cans of UV freon to add to the system.

The question:
How many cans of the UV leak freon do I use? Is there enough dye in a can to just add one, or do you need to refill the entire system with the UV freon?

Any info greatly appreciated.
Thanks
 

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AC leak

I assume you have a set of gauges so the system can be checked to see if, in fact you are losing R134. If you determine that you have a leak take the car to a shop that can recover the gas. Re- vacuum the system and let it stand for leak test. Again, if you do have a leak then the leak must be found. What I do is to charge the system with a few pounds of air and soap the joints until I find the leak. This will require a new dryer once the leak is found and the system opened BUT I have found a 2001 Kia Rio dryer to be an exact fit and is cheap.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I assume you have a set of gauges so the system can be checked to see if, in fact you are losing R134. If you determine that you have a leak take the car to a shop that can recover the gas. Re- vacuum the system and let it stand for leak test. Again, if you do have a leak then the leak must be found. What I do is to charge the system with a few pounds of air and soap the joints until I find the leak. This will require a new dryer once the leak is found and the system opened BUT I have found a 2001 Kia Rio dryer to be an exact fit and is cheap.
Thanks for the replay. I do have gauges and a vacuum pump.
As stated in the original post I have a UV leak detector as well.
My question was really just "how many cans of UV leak freon do you use"

Unfortunately I bought the expensive chrome drier from vintage air assuming all this was going to just work so I'd like to save it if I could.

The intake manifold on this car was leaking coolant when I fired it back up after sitting for many months so I've capped the drier and taken all the AC back apart and pulled the intake manifold off. I'm going to recrimp all the hoses, someone on some forum somewhere put some fear in me that if you over crimp the hoses will leak, so I erred on the not so crimped side. I already had to recrimp the high pressure hose as it started leaking oil as soon as it built pressure; after recrimp it held pressure just fine.

I'll check out that KIA RIO drier. My drier has a trinary switch that screws into the drier, so unless the KIA RIO drier has the same fitting its not going to work. If its literally identical then it possible might.

Have a lot to sort out, and I thought I was finishing up.
 

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Using vacuum to check for leaks will not reveal all.
It just isnt happening that way.Too many variables.Leaks at fittings for the gauges. Vacuum /pressure varies with temperature.
It is a good indicator of a larger leak. But minor ones that leak out over a few weeks it will not show. Refrigerant leaks fast under pressure in the system, even at rest (90-120 psi static) . A leak on the high pressure side is accelrated with the system operating, of course, and the low side leaks a little slower as the pressure is lower than the static (rest) pressure.

Using Dye in a system is a good way for the DIY to find a leak. Heck I do it that way most times ,if the leak is slow,because of the simple fact that electronic leak detectors in the past are so Fallible.

There are a few real good ones , but I have never spent the money to get one.
95 percent of the time, systems already have dye in them and the leak is easy to spot.

BE AWARE of what you dump in your system. If the cans you have are Refrigerant and dye and NO OIL, you are good to go.If you keep dumping oil in the system without knowing how much is in it, then you will wind up with high head pressures and poor or no cooling

You want to be reserve when adding oil. when a system is recovered with a machine, a few ounces is pulled out as well as the refrigerant.This can be measured as the machine has a seperate container where the oil is received.

When REFRIGERANT leaks out of system, and there is DYE in the system, the DYE stays behind, as does the oil it mixes with.

You will also need a blacklight (UV Light) and the special yellow glasses to see the dye / leak source.


https://www.amazon.com/Tracer-Produ...ocphy=9006814&hvtargid=pla-570370432290&psc=1


Notice That I call the gas "Refrigerant"?

"Freon" is and has always been a registered trademark of the Chemours Company for a product called R -12. R 134a ,r22,r504 etc , are all Refrigerants.

Gas in a A/C system is refrigerant. Just thought I would point that out.:mwink:

Hope this helps :welcome:
 

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AC leak

As I understand it the dryer will only absorb a very small amount of moisture and if you broke the system then it's ability to work properly is greatly diminished. The Kia dryer has a fitting on both side to accept YOUR trinary switch. Yes, I've had that "almost finished" feeling only to find out with lots of work another 6 months should do it!
 

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You dont need a new drier/accumulator at this point. Just be sure to vacuum the system for half hour to 45 minutes to pull any moisture from the system that may have entered when it was opened.

Refrigerant boils off out of the oil for a while after a system is discharged as well, kinda like soda pop fizzes. If you get the system sealed up inside of an hour or so after you open it, chances are there will be little or no air/moisture getting into the system. If you put stoppers in the ends of the open hoses/connections of the system, that is usually sufficient to keep it safe for a few weeks.Safe enough that a good vacuum will keep it in good shape.
Now if the system was open for weeks, I would say yes , replace it.
 

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As far as Dye and refrigerant, the directions should be on the can. Otherwise assume that the dye in the can is enough to color a whole system. If it has oil in it, use only the one can as long as the can has only 2 ounces of oil/dye.

If you dump in too much oil......:nono:
 
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