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I put up the tools against$300
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689 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I recently acquired several different airtools that are several decades old. I would like to rebuild them since a few of them have leaky gaskets. My concern is that it is probably going to be rather difficult to find replacements due to the age of the tools. Most of them were made by Rockwell but I can't locate many replacement parts. Does anyone know of a simple fix to this? Is there any type of silicon or other liquid that I could use to make a gasket. Many of them are rather intricate, resembling a transmission pan gasket, so they would be pretty difficult to cut out by hand.
 

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russlaferrera
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203 Posts
Air tool gaskets

As a suggestion, You may try some high temp silicone. If you can put it on the part , then put the part on a piece of wax paper until it cures (dries) . Then trim off the excess silicone with an xcacto knife. I have made a few gaskets like this.

Hope this helps....russ
 

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Hotrodders.com moderator
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9,581 Posts
a real fine seam of silicone sealant will work sometimes if one is real careful to not get too much on and gum up the passages..I have fixed the head gasket on an old air compressor that way..Still works..

Sam
 

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I put up the tools against$300
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689 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
thanks for the suggestions. I had an idea i may try, in my line of work I use a material to make quick setting molds, kind of like a dental amalgum. Most of the pieces that need a gasket could be pressed into this amalgum to make a "negative" of the gasket. I was thinking about mixing a little epoxy and silicon together for the gasket material, then pouring it into the "negative" to make a positive. a few passes on the belt sander and voila, a new gasket. This entire idea is in my head so who knows what I could come up with. I'll give it a shot today and let you know. If I didn't get these materials for free it would be a rather expensive process.
 

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Licenced Automotive Technician
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1,625 Posts
To make intricate gaskets, I use a piece of cearal box and a 3 oz ball pien hammer. Lay the card over the part, and use the rounded side of the ball on the hammer to "scissor" the material between the part and the hammer. Do this on the inside and oute, and then use a pen to poke the initial holes for any bolts, as a centering point. Then a gasket punch to cut the rest of the hole out, and you have one gasket. Fixed many a carb on old gas farm equipment like this, it's getting hard to find overhaul kits for Bendix updraft carbs!! But that molding idea sounds really interesting, please keep us posted. That sounds like a really cool way to make hard to find gaskets - and maybe even plastic parts??
 
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