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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys I just wanted to post up and see if I'm missing any steps, it's my first time with a solid cam so I wanna be sure I'm doing it right.

It's a 1970 c10 with a 10.3-1 355. I pulled the Comp 280H hydraulic ft out and put in a semi custom ground cam also from Comp. Its close to the 282s but not exact. It has .495" lift and [email protected]" and its on a 106 LSA. I put a coat of assembly lube on the cam and slid it in. Rotated the crank until the "0" dot on the crank gear was straight up, then put the cam gear on with the dot facing straight down. Loosened most of the oil pan bolts so I could get the 1 peice timing cover on (never using a 1-peice again, what a 2 hour nightmare!), used a bit of black RTV on the corners of the lower part of the T-cover, and just enough on the gasket to stick it in place. Timing cover on, I coated the new solid lifters with assembly lube and dropped them in, followed by the pushrods with a dab of lube on the top, followed by the roller rockers, then topped those with new poly locks. So, now the crank is set perfectly at #6 TDC (cam and crank gears at 12 and 6 o'clock) and the valvetrain is on but not tightened at all. I got a remote starter because I thought it may help adjustments go quicker and just make this more fun, so I'll hook that up tomarrow. That's where I stopped for tonight, and I wanted to see if anyone had any pointers or can see I'm skipping a step. Also wanted to ask a few questions.

Is the best method for setting valve lash on a good sized cam with some decent duration EOIC? How do I use my remote starter when using that method? And what should I set lash at to break in the new cam? Something other than the spec on the cam card? (.020")

I got 6 quarts of Comp break in oil and a couple new Wix filters. A bunch of VR1 for after break in is complete. Am I missing anything here? Intake is Edelbrock perf RPM, and carb is Holley 750 DP with manual choke and a 1" phenolic 4 hole spacer. Any tips for setting this carb up for a 106 LSA cam? The carb was installed and running great before tear down for cam swap, but smelled VERY rich while idling and puffed a little black smoke too.

Also, at what point should rotate the crank another turn to get #1 TDC?

Thanks guys, this is only my second cam and it's going into my first top end attempt, hence the questions


This puppy should pull like a mile and sound pretty awesome too! I'm excited for tomorrow

Matt
 

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I find turning the crank with the crankshaft bolt is easier than using the starter as it is more precise, but if you are using the bump switch and you go past where you wanted to stop you can just run it on around again with the starter, no big deal.

No reason to turn the crank manually to TDC #1 unless you just want to for your ease of dropping the distributor in....it will be easy enough to do that after the valve lash is set also, so it doesn't really matter.

Cold valve lash with iron block/iron heads set it .002" tighter than cam card spec....aluminum head/iron block set .006" tighter, aluminum head/aluminum block set .012" tighter.

Carb will need to be richer at idle with the 106° LSA cam due to it's increased overlap causing more exhaust dilution into the intake, so if it was overly rich before you might as well leave it right where it is now and try it out. Probably work out because the 106° LSA is more in line with what a DP is set up for out of the box.

Makes sure carb fuel bowls are full before you crank the starter, you want it to fire immediately for the cam break-in and not spend time cranking the starter to fill the fuel bowl. You can use a squeeze bottle and fill it though the bowl vent tube if needed.

Good luck and have fun, solids are a blast.:thumbup:
 

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camarodriver67
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Is the best method for setting valve lash on a good sized cam with some decent duration EOIC? For me it is the easiest way to set the lash. How do I use my remote starter when using that method? And what should I set lash at to break in the new cam. You use the remote starter switch to rotate the crank around to #1 cylinder @ TDC. Start with the valves on #1 cylinder and adjust cold. When the exhaust valve just begins to open adjust the lash on the intake valve. Using your feeler gauges set the lash to two degrees tighter than the spec on the card. Then set the exhaust valve lash when the intake valve is about halfway down on the closing side. Using the remote starter switch rotate the crank. Following the firing order finish adjust the lash on the other cylinders the same way. Set the crank so that #1 piston is @ TDC. When you get ready to drop in the distributor set the timing @ 18* BTDC by hand and drop it in.Make sure you start wiring the distributor cap on the post the rotor is pointing to. On the carburetor close both the primary and secondary throttle plates until the transfer slots are opened to about .020 before bolting to intake manifold.
 

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So, now the crank is set perfectly at #6 TDC (cam and crank gears at 12 and 6 o'clock) and the valvetrain is on but not tightened at all.

Is the best method for setting valve lash on a good sized cam with some decent duration EOIC? How do I use my remote starter when using that method? And what should I set lash at to break in the new cam? Something other than the spec on the cam card? (.020")
I've never set the timing gear dots the way you described. Where are the dots when on #1 TDC? And now is a great time to confirm #1 TDC on your timing cover.

EOIC is the only method I use, but I'd turn the crank by hand. If you don't have a tool to bolt onto the balancer, then use 3 4" 3/8 fine thread bolts and use a 2-3' foot pry bar to spin it over slowly.

Good luck
 

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..... When the exhaust valve just begins to open adjust the lash on the intake valve. Using your feeler gauges set the lash to two degrees tighter than the spec on the card. Then set the exhaust valve lash when the intake valve is about halfway down on the closing side......
The statement I highlighted is wrong....you adjust the intake valve when the exhaust valve is just coming to FULLY open......not when it just starts to open.....so many people get this wrong
 

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camarodriver67
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EO/IC rule (Exhaust Opening and Intake Closing). Set the intake valve lash when the exhaust valve is beginning to open. This will put the intake lifter at the base circle which is where you want it to be. Then set the exhaust valve lash when the intake valve is about halfway down on the closing side. This statement was take from this website http://www.dragzine.com/tech-stories/how-to-set-and-adjust-valve-lash-like-a-pro/. So Scott Shafiroff, Pat Musi, David Reher and Ashley Newman are all wrong I suppose. Starting with cylinder No. 1 (usually the head that is farthest forward on the block is No. 1) with the valve cover off, rotate the engine until the exhaust lifter begins to move upward. This is the point at which the exhaust valve is opening (EO), meaning the piston is through with the power stroke, and it’s about to begin the exhaust stroke. At this point, the intake valve is closed and the lifter is on the base circle of the camshaft and can be adjusted. This statement was taken from Camshaft - Car Craft Magazine Now I can;t believe that both of these articles can be wrong and you be right. ( Lashing Out: How to Adjust Valve Lash - OnAllCylinders ) With the valve covers and spark plugs removed, screw the poly-locks of the rocker arms until they just finger tight. Then, rotate the engine until the exhaust pushrod on the cylinder you are working on begins to move upward. You’ll be looking for any rocker arm movement. This is the process of exhaust opening. At this point, you can adjust the intake because the intake valve will be closed, ensuring that the intake lifter is on the base circle of the cam. Another article says the same thing again.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Okay I got lash set and intake manifold is on and sealed. I'm gonna drop the distributor now and I want to make sure I get it on the first try since I'm running in a new cam. How do I make sure the engine is at TDC #1, because I'm dropping the distributor in with the rotor pointing at #1, all plug wires are still on as they were
 

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You know, when I first started setting valves in engines, I tried to use the EOIC method. I thought positioning the valves this way for adjustment was just not very precise. I am a little anal. So, I came up with this method myself.
#1 intake cam lobe is exactly opposite #6 intake cam lobe. #8 is exactly opposite #5. #4 is opposite #7. #3 is opposite #2 and so on.
I write it out like this and set it on the air cleaner, just to keep me straight .

1-6
8-5
4-7
3-2
6-1
5-8
7-4
2-3

I rotate crank until #6 intake valve is at full lift, then adjust #1 intake valve. Rotate crank until #5 intake is at full lift and set #8 intake. Follow timing order . Then move to exhaust. Same procedure. To my mind this method makes absolutely certain the lifter is on the base circle when setting the valve. Y'all can hate on me for this method but it has worked for me for 40+ years.
The best tip I can give you on setting valves is to lock the shop door and turn off your phone until the valve covers are back on. Oh and don't use that remote starter as has been said.
 

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Okay I got lash set and intake manifold is on and sealed. I'm gonna drop the distributor now and I want to make sure I get it on the first try since I'm running in a new cam. How do I make sure the engine is at TDC #1, because I'm dropping the distributor in with the rotor pointing at #1, all plug wires are still on as they were
Remove #1 spark plug. Place your thumb over the spark plug hole. Have your buddy torque the motor over with a bar on the crank and when you feel pressure on your thumb, look at your damper and continue to bring the piston up in its bore until you reach TDC on the damper. Re-install #1 spark plug and stab the distributor in.
 

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Watch the valves on the #6 cylinder. As the exhaust begins to close and the intake opens you can turn the timing mark to your initial timing position and set the distributor in. If the oil pump drive shaft does not let the distributor drop in you can rotate the engine until it does or remove the distributor and turn the oil pump so it will line up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Okay I got lash set and intake manifold is on and sealed. I'm gonna drop the distributor now and I want to make sure I get it on the first try since I'm running in a new cam. How do I make sure the engine is at TDC #1, because I'm dropping the distributor in with the rotor pointing at #1, all plug wires are still on as they were
Remove #1 spark plug. Place your thumb over the spark plug hole. Have your buddy torque the motor over with a bar on the crank and when you feel pressure on your thumb, look at your damper and continue to bring the piston up in its bore until you reach TDC on the damper. Re-install #1 spark plug and stab the distributor in.
All the spark plugs are out, and I never really trusted that method because it seems like there's always some pressure on my thumb (or I'm just not good at it lol) is there a different way to make sure it's the right time to stab it in? Pressure on your thumb would mean you want #1 TDC on the compression stroke?
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Watch the valves on the #6 cylinder. As the exhaust begins to close and the intake opens you can turn the timing mark to your initial timing position and set the distributor in. If the oil pump drive shaft does not let the distributor drop in you can rotate the engine until it does or remove the distributor and turn the oil pump so it will line up.
I don't know what you mean by turn the timing mark to your initial timing position.
 

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All the spark plugs are out, and I never really trusted that method because it seems like there's always some pressure on my thumb (or I'm just not good at it lol) is there a different way to make sure it's the right time to stab it in? Pressure on your thumb would mean you want #1 TDC on the compression stroke?
Screw your compression tester into #1 hole. Easier to watch than contort your thumb into there.
 

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I don't know what you mean by turn the timing mark to your initial timing position.
Once you get #1 on its compression stroke you have to turn the crank to make sure the engine is at TDC. Whether you use a finger, gauge or the overlap on #6 cylinder you have to align the timing mark with the pointer.
I always include the initial advance so I line my marks up at 12 degrees BTDC. - as long as you give yourself enough room to time the engine after the distributor is in place it's not important.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I just read up on this and I think I got it figured. Drop the distributor when the #1 piston comes up AFTER the intake valve had just closed. That would be compression stroke because the intake valve closed locking in the air charge the piston just sucked in
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Got stopped short last night but I'm really hoping to get this thing started this evening after work. I'm excited about trying a solid lifter cam, and to see how the custom grind performs. I was a little nervous about setting lash because I've never done anything with a feeler gauge before, but I'm confident it's close.
 

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Hey guys I just wanted to post up and see if I'm missing any steps, it's my first time with a solid cam so I wanna be sure I'm doing it right.

It's a 1970 c10 with a 10.3-1 355. I pulled the Comp 280H hydraulic ft out and put in a semi custom ground cam also from Comp. Its close to the 282s but not exact. It has .495" lift and [email protected]" and its on a 106 LSA. I put a coat of assembly lube on the cam and slid it in. Rotated the crank until the "0" dot on the crank gear was straight up, then put the cam gear on with the dot facing straight down. Loosened most of the oil pan bolts so I could get the 1 peice timing cover on (never using a 1-peice again, what a 2 hour nightmare!), used a bit of black RTV on the corners of the lower part of the T-cover, and just enough on the gasket to stick it in place. Timing cover on, I coated the new solid lifters with assembly lube and dropped them in, followed by the pushrods with a dab of lube on the top, followed by the roller rockers, then topped those with new poly locks. So, now the crank is set perfectly at #6 TDC (cam and crank gears at 12 and 6 o'clock) and the valvetrain is on but not tightened at all. I got a remote starter because I thought it may help adjustments go quicker and just make this more fun, so I'll hook that up tomarrow. That's where I stopped for tonight, and I wanted to see if anyone had any pointers or can see I'm skipping a step. Also wanted to ask a few questions.

Is the best method for setting valve lash on a good sized cam with some decent duration EOIC? How do I use my remote starter when using that method? And what should I set lash at to break in the new cam? Something other than the spec on the cam card? (.020")

I got 6 quarts of Comp break in oil and a couple new Wix filters. A bunch of VR1 for after break in is complete. Am I missing anything here? Intake is Edelbrock perf RPM, and carb is Holley 750 DP with manual choke and a 1" phenolic 4 hole spacer. Any tips for setting this carb up for a 106 LSA cam? The carb was installed and running great before tear down for cam swap, but smelled VERY rich while idling and puffed a little black smoke too.

Also, at what point should rotate the crank another turn to get #1 TDC?

Thanks guys, this is only my second cam and it's going into my first top end attempt, hence the questions :)

This puppy should pull like a mile and sound pretty awesome too! I'm excited for tomorrow

Matt
If you are doing it right, aren't you going to degree the cam? Only way to know if cam is in like you think it is. I'm surprised no one has mentioned this. Jeg's kit should be able to do it with timing cover and rockers and balancer in place, part of which is establishing exact TDC#1 on the degree wheel (and balancer). Timing tape is added to balancer to make any needed corrections regarding the balancer mark.
 
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