Hot Rod Forum banner
1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
83 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
ok i just posted alternator problems, so i need a new one. i have had the car 5 years and had 4-5 alternators on it. i was a sucker for the 26.99 cheapy because of the warranty. its seems there crap so im goin for acdelco this time around. i have a 72 chevelle,but the motor is a 82 sbc with stock intake, unilite distributer and stock block. i looked up several alternators and there are different ones for 72-82 350 5.7L chevys. there 63 amps and 66 amps and the prices all vary from year to year as does the item number. how do i know which one is the correct one?and which one is the best to get? ive been buying one for a 72, maybe its not big enough?
:confused: help :confused:
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
18,633 Posts
Just about any GM alternator will bolt up with minimum problems. As long as they have the same wiring conections. You may want to go with an 80s alternator, with an internal regulator. They are much more reliable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,345 Posts
Load

Doc here :pimp:

The issue may be , what type of load are you trying to supply...

Do you have a lot of Accessories Going on there?

Maybe a Mega Watt Car that goes boom?

A Slamin' & Jumpin' Suspension System?

If so, Maybe a 60 Amp isn't going to cut it.

You need to take a total load test on the electrical system before you try to size the next alternator.. and match accordingly. You may need to upgrade to 100 amp.

As far as mounting, All different upgrades should bolt right up to the stock mounts..But you may want to check to see that the Alternator is sitting square and plumb in the mounts. This too will wear out the Alternator, as well as the water pump and just about anything on that drive belt.

Doc :pimp:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
83 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
thanks for the help. i realized today i have to have a 72 alternator because i have an external voltage regulator.i had to buy a cheapy again for now because it was the only one within 50 miles that was available. ive been told to take my old alternator to get rebuilt and it will last longer than buying another reman one.although i dont know the price it will cost to get it rebuilt yet im thinking about it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,345 Posts
rebuild

Doc here :pimp:

You CAN rebuild it yourself...Ezy as pie...

All you need is a Diode pack, (about $10 bucks) A Set of brushes, (about $5 bucks) and Bushings / or bearings (depending on how yours is made) or if the bearings and/or bushings are good, reuse them, although I usually replace them.

Just take off the 4 bolts that hold the case together, and the terminals, and carefully half the case...on the back case you'll find the diode pack, just pull it and insert your new diodes. (2 bolts)

Find your brush holders and remove the brushes, and install the new brushes (noting direction of the brush curve) Check your spring tensioner, and push the brushes all the way in. You should have a hole that goes through the case and brush holder, insert a paper clip in both holes to hold the brushes in while you reassemble the case.

With a Fine Emery Cloth, burnish the pads on the brush pick~up until they are nice and copper bright. Use a pocket knife or hobby knife and carefully clean the insulator bars in between the copper pads out by scraping them out towards you.

Next if you replace the bearings or bushings, get a puller (for bearings) and remove it , and for install use a section of pipe to carefully drive the bearings back on. On the End bells (the cases) use a sharp punch and punch a slight indent 1/3 the way around in the middle of the bearing race (this will keep the bearing from ever spinning in the race) .

Next you'll have to tap the end bell back on the case (the punch marks will make it a tight fit) and bolt it all back together.

Wala! Rebuilt alternator!

If none of the windings are bad, or the insulation on them hasn't broken down, which is rare, You'll have an alternator that will last years.

Doc :pimp:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
417 Posts
It is a very easy job to convert from an external regulator to an internal one and you will have less problems overall. Next time you have to replace, go for a heavy duty internally regulated unit.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top