Hot Rod Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I need a few awnsers...

I have been spraying PPG paint for the last 16 years, went from DBC to Global, then too Nexa.

Global was'nt all that great, but tolerable. Nexa on the other hand, just plain gives me trouble.

I think it has a lot to do with it being such a high solid paint, but there are way too many steps you have to take to make this stuff work, especially in the blends.

If anyone has sprayed this, or is currently spraying it, please respond. I have lots of issues with ppg in general, like when a few months down the line a car comes back to have something else done to it, and you can see the repair you did previously, to dieback, hazy looking....etc...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
I just demo-ed Nexa a few weeks ago and didn't like it at all....everythings way too thick!! I've used Sikkens since 1991 but I did work in another shop briefly ('96-'97) that used PPG and then Dupont. We had troubled with DBC mottling and striping. We had 3 painters and we all had the same thing happening. The rep came in and sprayed a hood on a light green metallic Honda and his striped worse than anybody, this after he said nobody else was having problems with mottling :rolleyes: . I also seen jobs return for other work and didn't like what I was seeing with the clears (2020 and 2001). So we switched to Dupont, and honestly I loved using that system. I ended up going to work for the Sikkens shop I'm at now. I will say that Sikkens does hold up very well over time, I'm just not crazy about color match with the Autobase Plus. I do blend into adjacent panels 99% of the time but still tint/adjust the color way more than I feel I should have to. Wish I could talk my boss into switching to Dupont. Rocco
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thanks again rocco!!!

You have answered a lot of my ?'s in that post.

You have been a painter for a while I assume as I have. Please answer me one more ?. Have you ever had a problem where you had a car come back(repeat customer), were you looked at your last repairs, and seen where maybe the paint rung out around the old repair, or where the paint was feathered?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
I've been doing body/paint for 22+ years :) . Are you talking about shrinkage? Like where maybe there was filler work done and the surrounding area of the OEM paint was scarred/scratched during the repairs with some coaser grit and after a few weeks or months you can see shrinkage into those scratches? Rocco
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
er actually....

I'm talking about that, and the fact that I can like feather a scratch(break through the oe paint) prime it, block it(maybe even the next day) seal it, and paint it, and during the summer it only takes a day or so, and you can see where you feathered the paint.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Yes I've seen it for sure. A lot has to do with the primer used, how it was applied, how long it was allowed to dry, etc. etc. Some primers just shrink more than others. I don't see a lot of this with Sikkens primers, especially if I'm just feathering out scratches it doesn't happen. The bodymen I paint for have a bad habit of scratching the crap out of the paint around their filler work and I do see the primer shrinking in those areas. I love doing my own mud work but don't get much of a chance at the shop I'm at, but if finished off correctly there shouldn't be any shrinkage. My truck was hit 2 yrs ago and I fixed the ext. cab and door myself and there isn't any signs shrinkage (Sikkens colorbuild, primed once). BTW. I've never like PPG's K36, I feel it shrinks more than anything I've used...is that what you're using or something else?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Nexa autocolor primer

before that we were using global primers, you name it we used it.
we can't get away from the sand scratch swelling, or the feathered ringout problem, even if I use 500 grit d.a. paper. Even if you let the primer dry overnight.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
The only thing I can suggest (you may already be doing it) is really let the first then second coat of primer flash off good before your final coat(s). I know in a production shop we all can get into a rush and watching primer dry isn't productive :) . But the flash time for that first & second coat really helps eliminate a lot of shrinkage. Some primers are going to shrink no matter what you do. BTW, I'll usually finish off my feather edge with 400 or 600 DA paper so you using 500 should be plenty fine. Another thing to try is once the primer is setting up, lightly scuff the top with a new red scotchbrite, that will help release some of the solvents.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
You are correct....

PPG sent there best people to our shop, and everything the tried failed.
It exactly matched everything we were coming up with.
They say next on there list is to send their chemists to our shop to find out what "WE" are doing wrong, even though like I say, they had the same results as we did...
 

·
point on positive
Joined
·
1,680 Posts
]

The Autocolor is sometimes the only choice in some factory motorcycle base colors. It often can trick you into putting to much reducer in there because of how the stir stick feels at first however I find that by resisting the temptation to use more than the recomended 1-1things go better. I think Autocolor's reducer seems VERY aggresive hence less is better.
To me it seems to behave best at higher air pressures..

Reds don't seem to cover as well for some reason..

I shy away from it also if I can get the color in DBU or Dbc.

http://www.a2zautoforums.com/showthread.php?t=3782
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,591 Posts
AKA (use to be ICI) i have used a ton of it over the years and will say it is one of the finest bases out there along with Spies, Standox, Debeer and Glasuirt.
How ever these bases require you use a good gun and a 1.4 or 1.3 tip, they also require you to know how to adjust your gun or your pissing up a rope.

If you over reduce any of the above bases you will be fighting yourself to the end of time on both blends and die-back issue.

To blend this base all you do is use the U-Blend method with each coat and forget it, you cannot reduce your blends. Rare metallics require an intercoat laid down first.

Right gun, proper adjustment for each color (Yes, each color requires a fine tune adjustment) and proper reduction these are the easiest and fastest bases to use.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Thank you...

Especially BarryK, rocco1, and last but not at all least milo.
You have told me things that I pretty much already know, but help me in my problems. I work in a high production shop where you don't have time to set air pressure, etc... I run artound 170+ plus hours a week between me and my partner, so it's paint it, buff it, and send it. I also do all my own buffing, and making sure the cars have no overspray on them, so I have very little time for adjusting to different colors.
We just sprayed two white pearl cars today, one a lexus, the other a nissan. Both the same paint code, all over today. Plus edged out parts for 4 other vehicles....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,591 Posts
When I first read your original post, I thought this is totally BS and this guy sells a competitive paint line because nothing you said fit as far as problems with the Nexa brand.

Four things come to mind that could cause these problems.

Using a lower grade reducer from another PPG brand to reduce this paint?

Using to fast a reducer for your conditions, fast is not faster with good heat?

Trying to use a lower grade clear with that base like say #55 or #42 they are not going to work as well with that base?

Also, with the hours your turning I trust your not trying to spray this base with a $55-$100 copy paint gun?

That is all I can think of.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top