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Will I ever get it done?
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I am thinking about getting a Be Cool radiator for my project car. Anyone have experience they would be willing to share that would help me make my decision?
 

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Pure American Muscle
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When I bought my car it had a Be-Cool 4 core rad. in it. I have used it for over a year and no problems. The workmenship on it is very nice and keeps more car cool. Of course it's not like I have some extreme engine but it does do a very nice job and looks good on top of that. You can even take alu. polish and polish it up so that it really shines lol. I agree with john though they do cost alot and if I hadn't got one with the car then I don't know if I would be giving you this bit about them.


Chris
 

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Yes, I have had two Be Cool Radiators in my 70 Camaro. They are nice but, as mentioned above they are PRICEY. You can get an aluminum radiator of the same quality for less. In my case the Be Cool was the only one that would fit the way I wanted. My current project will NOT have a be cool, just because of the price and a generic radiator will fit and do the job.
Royce
 

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56 chev on 79 chassis, 62 LeSabre
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i have used two summit $170 radiators and love them. put my fan thru the first one tho. make sure it's mounted securly, for some reason mine came out of a bracket even tho i couldn't shove it thru by hand. make sure you measure right and get what you want. you will have to run an auxillary trans cooler with the summit ones, which is why they are cheaper i think, but they are very well made. i really have to wonder how BeCool stays in business at $400+ per unit
 

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bullheimer,
I wish my Be Cool was only $400, Mine was closer to $550 (70 Camaro specific with tranny cooler, non polished). There is a place that will custom make an aluminum radiator for you for less than that. I cannot remember the name off hand. This is what I will use on my current project.

Royce
 

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The Smell of Nitro in the morn
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Be-Cool is made close to my house, they are made to flow in a different pattern, I know a few that use them and have no complaints. Get what you pay for. I had a Griffin until it sprung a leak and have the stock one back in without any problem.
 

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Will I ever get it done?
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
If you have an early car with a narrow, down-flow radiator, you are kinda limited on what you can put in it. I know Walker and Be Cool make them. I have heard Walker is quality. They are brass I believe. I wasn't sure about the Be Cool. Any other good brands out there for pre-war cars?
 

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redsdad,
Don't get me wrong the Be Cool was definetly top notch. If they have one that fits your needs go for it. They are just not cheap. Have you checked with Griffin Radiators? I thought my neighbor had a griffin in his car and it is not a crossflow car.

1Bad how do they flow any different? They are made with 2-1" tubes and they are cross flow (in my case).

Royce
 

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I wish someone would do a test on the heat transfer ability of these rads versus a good original 3 or 4 core rad. Make sure to pump it like a water pump would and put a fan for airflow thru the rad.

I still have a hard time following the concept that these alum. rads flow better than the old copper core and fin rads. Copper is a better conducter of heat. Call me a sceptic.... but << "uses fluted oval tubes to "Turbulate" the passing water for maximum exposure to the outer wall of the radiator tube." >> ???? I guess as long as it sounds good and they can convince enough people that the rads are made smart, and as long as they look cool (cant forget that) then they stay in business.

I say if you want the looks go buy one ( I like the looks of them) but if you just simply want to remove heat from your engine in an efficient way... go with original copper.
 

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Pure American Muscle
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I like them because they are alu. it's nice to know that I don't have to worry about rust with them. In my mind they will both do an = job but the added feature of alu. is what I like. With that in mind I really wouldn't care what alu. rad. it was be cool or not.

Chris
 

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Ktaves1971 said:
I wish someone would do a test on the heat transfer ability of these rads versus a good original 3 or 4 core rad. Make sure to pump it like a water pump would and put a fan for airflow thru the rad.

I still have a hard time following the concept that these alum. rads flow better than the old copper core and fin rads. Copper is a better conducter of heat. Call me a sceptic.... but << "uses fluted oval tubes to "Turbulate" the passing water for maximum exposure to the outer wall of the radiator tube." >> ???? I guess as long as it sounds good and they can convince enough people that the rads are made smart, and as long as they look cool (cant forget that) then they stay in business.

I say if you want the looks go buy one ( I like the looks of them) but if you just simply want to remove heat from your engine in an efficient way... go with original copper.
I just got done doing a big block swap in my 71 Nova. It had a 4 core copper radiator in it and when operating the motor the temperature would get into the 225 range while driving down the road. With the exact same setup, same radiator simensions and all, I switched in a Griffin two core aluminum radiator and the temperature literally doesnt go over 170 while driving, and creeps up to around 185 while at an idle. I bought my Griffin 19x27 aluminum radiator for 212 including tax, and I am VERY happy with it.

Rob
 

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radiator

I've got a 69 big block corvette that was fine as long as the car was moving but when you got stuck in traffic and had to idle for a while- it was a bummer. I even took the 4 core out and had a shop build an extra row of copper tubing in it-5 core, and it still wasn't much better.This was with mech fan. I added electric and still not good. Then I bought a Griffin aluminum 2 row and it totally kicks ***. I've got two electric fans and no mechanical fan now and I don't hardly have to turn the fans on on a cool day. I even ran it at idle for over an hour in a parade and it was great- I just flipped 1 or sometimes 2 of the fans on 180-190 no problem. The install was easy- no mods except the holder brackets needed to be squeezed together for the skinnier radiator. They cost, but it was worth it, not having to worry about the thing overheating anymore.
 

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Race it, Don't rice it!
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You know it's possible to get to thick.

You must get air through the rad to transfer heat. If it's to thick you'll stack air in front of it with little flow through it. Fin count has a lot to do with it as well. Even with a good fan. In rads with straight liner flow, the water on the inside portion of the tubes never touches the exterior walls losing it's heat. Turbulence prevent's this from happening. And remember, You can never turn a water pump fast enough. Assuming a good pump that doesn't cavitate.
 

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Cooling problems

Just posting this because I'm to lazy to get up and go outside where the work is (I'm retired).
Had big overheating problems with my '51 Mercury with a souped-up '63 Ford 289. Looking through a magazine and saw a 12 in. fan made by Zirgo that according to their ad pulled 1600 cfm whereas the Haden fans were rated at 800 cfm so I ordered one.
Although those folks at Zirgo were extremely nice their 1600 cfm fand did NOT flow a dam bit more than the Haden fan sitting right next to it (I run two 12 in. fans side by side wired identically, through a relay and activated by a heat switch). One amusing thing about it was Zirgo's installation instructions wanted 10 ga. wires off the relay to the fan but they had 14 ga. wires comming out of the fan motor - go figure.
I also bought and installed a Griffin 4 tube radiator and it fit to a "T". The only thing I don't like about it is the tubes are expxied to the tanks and I had one like that fail on my drag race only '70 Camaro - you guessed it - in the staging lanes.
Just thought I'd pass this along,
Charlie Smith
 

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Very good stories guys about your new alum rads cooling better. And I believe you too. But I have had similiar experiences with just putting in a new OEM rad. A fact to remember is that a new rad does not have any corrosion, gunk, or calcium buildup on the inside. It is clean as a whistle, and ANY buildup inside at all, even the tiniest bit starts insulating the coolant and reducing its ability to get rid of the heat. But I would like to hear new copper versus new alum rad stories. You might be able to convince me yet.
 

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Ktaves1971 said:
I wish someone would do a test on the heat transfer ability of these rads versus a good original 3 or 4 core rad. Make sure to pump it like a water pump would and put a fan for airflow thru the rad.

I still have a hard time following the concept that these alum. rads flow better than the old copper core and fin rads. Copper is a better conducter of heat. Call me a sceptic.... but << "uses fluted oval tubes to "Turbulate" the passing water for maximum exposure to the outer wall of the radiator tube." >> ???? I guess as long as it sounds good and they can convince enough people that the rads are made smart, and as long as they look cool (cant forget that) then they stay in business.

I say if you want the looks go buy one ( I like the looks of them) but if you just simply want to remove heat from your engine in an efficient way... go with original copper.
Because of the considerable lower density of aluminum, it is more effiecent at transferring heat into air. This is because less of the heat energy goes into heating the mass of the metal, and so the same amount of heat will raise the temperature of the metal higher, resulting in a larger temperature difference between the radiator and the air. You have a higher surface area/mass ratio.

The only problem is that aluminum does not transfer heat within itself as well as copper does; it is possible for the inside of the fins to be a lot warmer than the outside.

An excellent system uses a copper core and aluminum fins, the only problem with this is that a very good thermal connection must be made between the two metals (soldering or brazing is preferred) and even the best methods result in a slight thermal barrier. This system is also much more expensive, and not worth the extra expense for a vehicle. It is used in newer computer heatsinks, which have a very high thermal output per square inch.

It's all about surface area, the secret of the universe!
 
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