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Discussion Starter #1
When i shot my first couple parts with the epoxy it went on grainy, apparently i wasn't applying wet enough coats. Striping was minimal but there are a few spots where you can see where more went on it's got more gloss. Otherwise i was quite impressed with my first job holding a gun. It was shot in my garage on a day that was about 22*C.

Now for my next parts i'm going to try to tune the gun better for a smoother finish. This is where i have my question, i have a removable filter inside the gun that i was thinking of removing. I have paint strainers/filters to pour the paint through before going into the cup. When i pulled the gun apart after painting last time the filter was pretty much completely clogged, so i'm wondering if the filter is too fine for the epoxy, or if that's possible.

The epoxy i'm using is a zero induction epoxy, in a semi-gloss black (which is how i was planning on driving the car for a while) It's PPG's phillips brand epoxy if anyone is firmilliar with it, it's an industrial coating and was suggested by my jobber over the other epoxies they carry.
 

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After that same thing happened to me, I removed that filter and never put one in again. Everything has been fine since.
 

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Take the strainers out of the gun and lose them.

On the fluid adjustment of your gun make sure its half way in. spray a small pass and adjust in or out one turn at a time until it sprays like glass. Remember if peel to get rid you turn in.
Upping air pressure will also help. 30-35lbs should be good at gun.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
tried without the filter, and it worked a heck of alot better, still has a textured look to it....it might be the paint itself, or my cheapy gun, or the idiot using it. When the primer was wet i could see a spot where i messed up with the filler too......

Some people just arn't cut out for this i guess :embarrass

gives me a heck of alot of respect for good bodymen, and crazy metal shapers like randy. The door i primed was hit in an accident and just body filler overtop, so i took out the filler, tried my hand at a dent puller, it came out pretty decent, i thought it was allmost flat, then put chopped fiberglass overtop after welding and grinding the holes from the puller. Then bondo, and i realized that i should have pulled the dent more.

edit: another coat of primer revealed that the first was not super thick, and the apparent indent in the finished panel was the filler showing though the primer. it's all good now
 
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