Hot Rod Forum banner

1 - 20 of 33 Posts

·
Acoustic Rock ... for real.
Joined
·
1,983 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hey, Dan

Can you explain a few things to me?

1. Tacsew says the bobbin can be changed without removing the article being sewn ... I'm not sure how to do that or what it means.

2. The Tacsew has a thread release finger (for heavy thread) ... again, I'm not sure how to do that or what it means.

3. I noticed that the outer (U-shaped) foot sits a bit higher than the center foot on my machine and I was curious about why that would be ... then I read this: "The Tacsew permits the raising and lowering of the center foot which allows for sewing different thicknesses of materials and thus assures positive stitching." -- can you explain this?

Thanks, Dan!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
306 Posts
Eagerly awaiting the answer as well... :sweat:

I think I know the answers to a couple of these questions, but I'm not sure and don't want to prove to the world that I'm an idiot - they already know - lol.

You think Dan will figure this out and start charging us for answers?

Between you, me, and everyone else on the web, I wish Dan would create a DVD or two on sewing, tips, techniques, and pointers. I know I'd buy it!

By the way, Alan - still waiting for the Robert Johnson tribute album. My favorite of yours is still "Who Do You Say?" but only because I know it best and find myself singing it here and there... Keep the finger to the fret, man - you got talent, and it's obvious.

Cheers!

Dusty
 

·
Acoustic Rock ... for real.
Joined
·
1,983 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thanks, Dusty ... I sure do appreciate compliments like that one, Brother!

As for Dan's proposed DVD ... I'd surely buy it, too, if only to say thanks for what he's already shared with us this past week! I love you, Dan! LOL!! Nothing personal, man ... just a sincere note of honest appreciation for your patient and concise answers to our questions here at Hotrodders.com! I'm on fire with my new Tacsew and you sure have helped feed the flames in a most positive way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,925 Posts
PM me know if Dan doesn't respond to this in the next couple days. He lives up here by me and I can roust him out to answer your question in the event he hasn't been checking into the site.

[added with edit] I just emailed Dan in the hopes that it will get him up off the couch and logged into HR.Com. If this doesn't work, I'll go over to his shop and beat down the door.

Dewey
 

·
Acoustic Rock ... for real.
Joined
·
1,983 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Thanks, Dewey!

Dan sure has been checking in here these past few days though ... we're making him dizzy with questiuons to answer -- and he's been answering them all!
:mwink:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
90 Posts
horvath said:
Hey, Dan

Can you explain a few things to me?

1. Tacsew says the bobbin can be changed without removing the article being sewn ... I'm not sure how to do that or what it means.

2. The Tacsew has a thread release finger (for heavy thread) ... again, I'm not sure how to do that or what it means.

3. I noticed that the outer (U-shaped) foot sits a bit higher than the center foot on my machine and I was curious about why that would be ... then I read this: "The Tacsew permits the raising and lowering of the center foot which allows for sewing different thicknesses of materials and thus assures positive stitching." -- can you explain this?

Thanks, Dan!!!
I am not Dan but, I am by no meaning a machine expert but here goes.

1: If your bobbin loads from the side you can just tilt you machine and swap bobbins

2: release finger?

3: I should have said as well, that you must lower the out foot manualy by either using the knee lever or the hand lever behind the machine.
Make sure you drop the foot to sew.

The height varies to walk. You'll notice the inner foot moves up, forward, down and back, the outer jsut up and down.
On the rear of the machine you'll see an arm, just behind (under) that arm is the tension bar for the center foot. Adjusting that changes the pressure on the center foot. The screw should be directly on top of the machine above that bar.
If your going from sewing curtains, you'd need to decreses the pressure for leather so that the matrerial doesn't bind and sewing proper length stiches.
 

·
Acoustic Rock ... for real.
Joined
·
1,983 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Thanks, Armysniper.

1. Re: The bobbin.
There must be a technique for handling this. When a bobbin runs out, I would guess that you'd miss a couple of stitches ... so you stop sewing, put a new bobbin in ... and then what? You go back a few stitches to pick up where you left off ... and, of course, you don't want to double stitch any stitches ... do you need to tie or secure the end of the old and new bobbin threads?

3. Re: Foot adjustments.
Should the outer foot be adjusted to the same height as the inner foot? Right now, my outer foot is slightly higher than the inner foot.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
6,734 Posts
Thanks for the heads up Dewey, and leave my door alone :D (BTW, let me know how your latest project is going.) I was working on our annual snowmobile dance and didn't get any time to post. Alan: For normal sewing, both parts of the feet should be at the same level, but this is when the needle is at the bottom of it's stroke when the hook is just ready to go past the needle to pick up the top thread. If the needle is in any other position, the feet will be slightly different in height, one way or another. If you lift up the foot and leave it up while you turn the handwheel you can see this. For other sewing with heavier materials, it may require un-equal heights, and that's when you need to adjust. As far as changing the bobbins goes, I can't change my bobbin without taking the work out, and I have never seen a machine that would. In order to change bobbins, you have to get the new bobbin thread under the tension on the bobbin case and I don't know how that's possible unless you can hold the thread in your hand to do it. (Armysniper do you agree?)That's why I always change to a new bobbin or check to make sure I have enough bobbin thread before topstitching vinyl or leather. If you forget to check, (something I would never do, LOL) what I do is go back about 4 stitches, put the needle through one of the holes from the previous stitches and continue sewing. After you finish the seam you're working on, go back to where the splice is and pull on the bottom thread which will pull the top thread through to the back side. Cut off both pieces of thread leaving about 1/4" of each. Then take a BIC lighter and melt the thread. This is not perfect by any means and I wouldn't do it any place that would obviously show. As far as a regular seam goes, just start an inch back from where the thread ran out, backstitch it and keep going. As far as the release finger goes, I don't have a clue. As far as the DVD goes, I'm not pretty enough for that. As far as charging for my services, the invoice is in the mail (no checks accepted).
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
6,734 Posts
Alan: I just checked on the thread finger with my sewing machine mechanic. It's there to allow heavy thread to pass by without screwing up your machine. I have one on both my machines also. I can't totally explain it, but you don't have to do anything, it does it automatically.
 

·
Acoustic Rock ... for real.
Joined
·
1,983 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Thanks, Dan. I'll have to experiment with the feet levels and learn how to apply this knowledge to my projects. I sure would like to take a class that teaches about these machines!

Note: The Consew 206RB has a "safety clutch and thread release finger (for heavy thread)", and also claims that the "bobbin can be changed without removing article being sewn."

I did find this about the release finger (?)
  • A lockstitch sewing machine includes a rotary hook, with a bobbin housing and a cam is provided for the rotation-secure retention of the bobbin housing and it is arranged a small distance behind the stitch hole in the direction of hook rotation. A holding finger for holding the bobbin housing against rotation with the hook body projects from the bobbin housing, as well as a supporting finger arranged substantially 90-degrees before the stitch hole. A shoulder projecting from the bobbin housing is associated with the supporting finger.
I'm gonna have to research this and figure it out. First of all, everyone I talk to seems to say the same thing; that there really is no "heavy" thread ... just stronger thread (nylon vs cotton). Even the jean thread isn't much heavier than the #92, from what I can see.
 

·
Acoustic Rock ... for real.
Joined
·
1,983 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Oops. I posted the above while you were posting your's about the thread finger. Thanks again, Dan.

PS - The instruction manual for my Tacsew (made in China) is insane to try and read! It's exactly as though a Chinese person, who speaks English very poorly, is speaking to you and says things that are impossible to interpret!
:pain:
It's not really a problem ... but it sure does make one wonder why they do things like this.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
90 Posts
DanTwoLakes said:
In order to change bobbins, you have to get the new bobbin thread under the tension on the bobbin case and I don't know how that's possible unless you can hold the thread in your hand to do it. (Armysniper do you agree?)That's why I always change to a new bobbin or check to make sure I have enough bobbin thread before topstitching vinyl or leather. If you forget to check, (something I would never do, LOL) what I do is go back about 4 stitches, put the needle through one of the holes from the previous stitches and continue sewing. After you finish the seam you're working on, go back to where the splice is and pull on the bottom thread which will pull the top thread through to the back side. Cut off both pieces of thread leaving about 1/4" of each. Then take a BIC lighter and melt the thread. This is not perfect by any means and I wouldn't do it any place that would obviously show. As far as a regular seam goes, just start an inch back from where the thread ran out, backstitch it and keep going.
I do! I mean, yes I agree.
I too "always" make sure there is enough bobbin thread when top stiching. Pre-wound bobbins are the best thing since sliced bread, for just the thing.
I also tie square knot before flaming thread (fyi, that is to prevent unravelling).

BTW: there are definetly "beefier" threads for top stiching, I cannot recall how they are defined but I'll get back to ya on that.
 

·
Acoustic Rock ... for real.
Joined
·
1,983 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Please do!
:cool:
I want to try these "beefier" threads ... seems to me that for top stitching or french stitching, a bolder statement should be made.

Where's the beef!? The only "beefy" thread I've seen is the jean thread ... and it's not much, really.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
6,734 Posts
What they're referring to is 138 , 210, and 277 thread that are use for tents, awning and canvas. 138 is twice as thick as 69, 210 is 3 times as heavy, and 277 is 4 times as heavy. You need a bigger needle (150 instead of 135) to be able to sew with it. It's hard to find colors other than black or white. Have you to understand goodly that which I am to say you?
 

·
Acoustic Rock ... for real.
Joined
·
1,983 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
DanTwoLakes said:
What they're referring to is 138 , 210, and 277 thread that are use for tents, awning and canvas. 138 is twice as thick as 69, 210 is 3 times as heavy, and 277 is 4 times as heavy.
Ah-haaa! *That's* what I needed to know! "Canvas thread!"

You need a bigger needle (150 instead of 135) to be able to sew with it.
I don't understand "150" or "135" ... my needles are "22" or "17" ... ???

It's hard to find colors other than black or white.
That sucks ... but, oh well -- at least it's available.

Have you to understand goodly that which I am to say you?
ROTFLMAO! You've read your manual, too!
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
6,734 Posts
The standard needle for your Tacsew is 135x17. The eye of the needle is the 17 or 22, with the 22 being the largest. 150 would be a larger, heavier needle.

O.K. Alan, now you're going to teach me something. I try to put pictures in my posts with my 6 megapixel digital camera, and it says that the file is too large and won't accept them. How do I get around that? I also have a 3.2 MP camera, but the pictures turn out lousy when they get blown up. What am I doing wrong?
 

·
Acoustic Rock ... for real.
Joined
·
1,983 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
DanTwoLakes said:
The standard needle for your Tacsew is 135x17. The eye of the needle is the 17 or 22, with the 22 being the largest. 150 would be a larger, heavier needle.
Wow ... I can't believe how many pieces of this puzzle you guys have put together for me in the past week.

So what needle do you use for the canvas thread -- 150/17 or 150/22?

O.K. Alan, now you're going to teach me something.
Awesome! I get to balance these scales some!

I try to put pictures in my posts with my 6 megapixel digital camera, and it says that the file is too large and won't accept them. How do I get around that?
Pictures taken directly from your camera, depending on your camera settings, are probably like 2000 pixels wide (like 18 inches!) x 1000 pixels high and also like 300 ppi (pixels per inch) ... the web wants 72 ppi and your pic size should be more like 600 pixels wide by 300 pixels high (a much smaller file size).

So ... you have 2 options:
1. Read your camera manual (and hope it wasn't wriiten in Chinelish or Englese) and set it up to take pictures for the web by selecting a 600 pixels wide (or something like that) and 72 ppi or dpi setting. Note: You won't want these for printing on your printer ... only for the web.

2. After loading the pics onto your PC, open them in a graphics or photo program and resize them to like 600 pixels wide and 72 ppi. If you don't have anything, I think this is one that's free:
http://tinyurl.com/33yk58

I also have a 3.2 MP camera, but the pictures turn out lousy when they get blown up. What am I doing wrong?
You can always make any picture smaller and maintain it's integrity but you can never make a picture larger ... it will *always* get blurred out. Simple as that.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
6,734 Posts
Thanks, Alan. I use Picasa 2 (totally free from Google) to edit pictures. I didn't know I could resize them like that until now.

BTW, I screwed up on the needle size explanation. 135x17 refers to the dimensions of the parts of the needle, the other number 14, 16, 18, 20, 22 refers to the duty rating of the needle with 22 being heavy duty and lower numbers being lighter duty.

In the attached picture both the needles are 135x17, (about 1 3/4" long) but the one on the right is a 22 and the one on the left is an 18.


(do I learn quick or what?)
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
306 Posts
horvath said:
So ... you have 2 options:
1. Read your camera manual (and hope it wasn't wriiten in Chinelish or Englese) and set it up to take pictures for the web by selecting a 600 pixels wide (or something like that) and 72 ppi or dpi setting. Note: You won't want these for printing on your printer ... only for the web.

2. After loading the pics onto your PC, open them in a graphics or photo program and resize them to like 600 pixels wide and 72 ppi.

You can always make any picture smaller and maintain it's integrity but you can never make a picture larger ... it will *always* get blurred out. Simple as that.
Absolutely correct. Without hijacking this thread (sewing, thread? - nyuk nyuk nyuk... :rolleyes: ) here's what I do:

I take my pics at the 5.0 megapixel setting on my camera. I load the pictures into my photo editing program, and crop them first. This is important to do at the picture's maximum resolution, as it just might solve the "size problem" without going any further. Then I resize the cropped image if I need to. I use 800 pixels as a maximum height or width, depending on the picture's orientation. I save the pictures after every step along the way.

Your monitor's maximum resolution is about 25-30 DPI (dots per inch) if you have the old CRT (tube type) monitor, and a little better if you have an LCD screen. For printing, 72 DPI is considered adequate, as long as you're not after portrait quality prints. If you're after good quality prints, leave the resolution alone. If all I'm going to do is post the picture online, I set the resolution on my photo editor at 72 DPI and save again. Once that's done, the picture is usually ready to post just about anywhere online.
 
1 - 20 of 33 Posts
Top