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Registered
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605 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hello. I reside in Canada, and am trying to find automotive schools. I don't just want a basic 2 year automotive collision repair stuff available at community colleges. Places like UTI and Wyotech really appeal to me, and seem to be about what I want to do.

Is there places like these in Canada or the States? Or any other places you guys know of that have a good reputation?

And, do I need to learn repair on family sedans before I can learn welding and custom work and Hi-performance stuff?

I am so lost. Thank you.
 

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Paintshop Dog
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404 Posts
Personally I'd say do something else. The paint and body industry is totally run by "Tight Arse" insurance companies. :mad: This makes it hard to eek out a living. Take it from a guy who's been stuck in it for almost 20 years. :( But, if you must, I would say go get a job at a shop and learn first hand. Tech schools, in my opinion, don't do much good in this industry. You can learn more in a shop in the same amount of time, and get payed while you learn, not pay to learn. Anyway, that's my $.02 worth.

Good Luck! :thumbup:
 

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Licenced Automotive Technician
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1,625 Posts
I don't know what the schools are like in B.C, but Alberta Apprenticeship oversees the autobody trade in Alberta. It is an apprenticeship course, much like Automotive Service, and requires two months at school learning the basics, and the other ten at work in a real shop with a licenced autobody tech. IIRC, it is a four year program, with both a provicial license and the opportunity to write the "Red Seal", or interprovincial certification.

I am not an autobody tech, my field is auto service so my info on the body side is a little sketchy. However, I have several friends who went through the Alberta autobody program, and they are all good techs. From what they say and my own observations, I would recommend the program at SAIT in Calgary. In any event, if this is the trade you prefer, go get the license and Red Seal, get a few years (at least five) trade experience, and then try to find a hot rod shop. That way you will know for sure if it is what you want to do, and you will have some well established skills to bring into the "fancy" shop.


Just my advice, and it is worth exactly what was paid for it. :mwink:
 
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