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Discussion Starter #1
This is my first post, but I've been lurking for awhile. Did a search and could not find any info on this.

Been thinking of adding a belly pan to my car, primarily to protect the underbody components from rust/dirt/stone damage/etc.

Is there a downside to these (for example, any negative aerodynamic effects)?

Is it wise to enclose the exhaust system?

Are louvers a requirement?

What's the best material(s) to use?

I plan on applying this to a more modern car, but I think the answers to these questions can be applied to a lot of cars.

Thanks in advance...
 

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Modern cars generate so much drivetrain heat it would not be feasible to use a "belly pan" on them.
If you want to protect your underpinnings from the hazards of the road, stay in the garage. LOL
There really aren't many "hazards" which could dramatically effect your vehicles bottom end. Just keep it clean just like your own.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Unfortunately, I live in the snow belt of Ohio, where road salt is a problem for almost half the year. I do wash the undercarriage at least 2x a week, but it still doesn't keep the salt from corroding the chassis. Other than finding something to keep the damage down, my only other real choice is to choose another car to be dissolved.

I didn't intend to cover the area under the engine. I'm primarily concerned with the firewall-back, to protect the fuel lines, brake lines, rear suspension, etc. Not covering the exhaust system is probably doable if heat is a concern.

Perhaps a belly pan is overkill - maybe just enclosing the line runs and rear suspension is a better idea. However, it seems like it'd be a lot less work to just have a flat pan across large sections of the undercarriage, rather than fabbing small covers to follow the line runs or suspension components.
 

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Just keep it clean underneath and get a good undercoating job. That's about all you can do. A pan might make matters worse. Some of that salt would get under the pan and then it would be hard to clean off and you wouldn't notice any damage until to late.
 
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