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Brian Martin,Freelance adviser
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Yes, it can be fixed, on a frame rack with experiance. I think this is a job for a body shop.

Brian
 

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Paintshop Dog
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It would be a very difficult task for a pro with the right equipment, to straighten a late model truck frame with very significant damage behind the front suspension. Dodge trucks of the late 90's had issue in that area, because they were weak at the rear-control-arm mounts. Late model Chevy's, on the other-hand, are fairly solid in that area. That could certainly cause for difficult times, and if it is not fixed properly, the truck will never track straight.
 
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CMC....You hit it right on the head. I don't see how anyone that knows what they are talking about could say it can be fixed without looking at it. I would need to see a lot of photos before I would say it could possibly be fixed. Areas like that are a lot stronger to try to fix than they are to bend in an accident. Try bending a curve in a piece of square tubing and see how it works.

It all depends on the type of bend in it.

Aaron
 

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adtkart said:
CMC....You hit it right on the head. I don't see how anyone that knows what they are talking about could say it can be fixed without looking at it. I would need to see a lot of photos before I would say it could possibly be fixed. Areas like that are a lot stronger to try to fix than they are to bend in an accident. Try bending a curve in a piece of square tubing and see how it works.

It all depends on the type of bend in it.

Aaron

I bought a 72 elcomina that I did not realize that the frame was bent at the curve of the frame below the firewall we tried to bend it back and the 7000 lb tractor we tied on to just slid side ways. heat did not help and I told my boy there are certain jobs beyond our capabilities and we bought another 71 elco and switched out the frames and have been driving for tha last couple of years.


 

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Brian Martin,Freelance adviser
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Aaron, you are right that there is a possiblity that it "shouldn't" be fixed, but it is an impossibility that it CAN'T be fixed. :) Like I aways say when someone asks, "Can this be fixed", "Sure it can, if it were ran over by a train, it can be fixed, but is it worth it?"

That area of the frame is VERY common to get bent on ALL full frames with IFS. It is a weak point because it is already "bent" by design from the factory. Like any bent piece of metal, it will bend more, with less force than a straight piece. Sooooooo, then the truck gets hit or hits something on the end of the front frame horn OR on the wheel forcing back the control arm the frame will bend MORE at that point behind the suspension and in front of the "torque box". It is everyday affair at body shops across the country.

And YES, they can be repaired and ARE repaired every single day. All it takes is a body/frame man who knows what he is doing. This is no big mystry.

But of course, a blanket statment like "It can be fixed" is probably assuming too much, it is easy to be picked apart. :rolleyes:

Brian
 
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From Merriam-Webster
The definition of "Fix"
Main Entry: 1fix
Pronunciation: 'fiks
Function: verb
Etymology: Middle English, from Latin fixus, past participle of figere to fasten; akin to Lithuanian dygti to sprout, break through
transitive verb
1 a : to make firm, stable, or stationary b : to give a permanent or final form to: as (1) : to change into a stable compound or available form <bacteria that fix nitrogen> (2) : to kill, harden, and preserve for microscopic study (3) : to make the image of (a photographic film) permanent by removing unused salts c : AFFIX, ATTACH
2 a : to hold or direct steadily <fixes his eyes on the horizon> b : to capture the attention of <fixed her with a stare>
3 a : to set or place definitely : ESTABLISH b : to make an accurate determination of : DISCOVER <fixing our location on the chart> c : ASSIGN <fix the blame>
4 : to set in order : ADJUST
5 : to get ready : PREPARE <fix lunch>
6 a : REPAIR, MEND <fix the clock> b : RESTORE, CURE <the doctor fixed him up> c : SPAY, CASTRATE
7 a : to get even with b : to influence the actions, outcome, or effect of by improper or illegal methods <the race had been fixed>

The definition of "REPAIR"
"1 a : to restore by replacing a part or putting together what is torn or broken : FIX <repair a shoe> b : to restore to a sound or healthy state : RENEW <repair his strength>"

Without looking at the damage and evaluating it, there is no one, not even Mr Martinsr, that can say that a damaged frame can be repaired. Depending on the amount of damage, it may be "repairable", or it may not. It is more than just pulling it so it looks right. You need to make sure that you have not compromised the integrity of the frame. You don't want it to just appear "repaired", as it can fail to protect you in an accident, by simply colapsing.


And YES, they can be repaired and ARE repaired every single day. All it takes is a body/frame man who knows what he is doing. This is no big mystry.
I guess I just couldn't see the damage thru the screen. There are a lot of "so called repairs" done everyday. Does that mean that they are right? Not on anything I am going to drive, or allow one of my family members to ride in.

Your best bet is to take it to a shop that is qualified to do frame repairs and let them evaluate it.

Aaron
 

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Brian Martin,Freelance adviser
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eugeneragsdale said:
i have a ???? how do u fix a fram that is bent the frame is a box type and it is on a 4x4 cheve luv the brnd is at thefront behind the tirecan it be fixed

Eugeneragsdale, ignore the peeing contest here on the forum and take the advice we all have given, take it to a qualified shop and have them take a look at it.

Your Luv truck is not a late model complex frame. It doesn't have high strength steel (HSS) or "ultra high strength steel" (UHSS) or hydoformed rails or anything like what you would find on a late model full frame. Your frame even if pretty severly damaged can be repaired by a qualified body and frame man using a quality multi pull frame rack (where more than one pull can be made at a time, your's WILL require this).


Just take it in and be sure they have a REAL drive on frame rack with multi pull capibilities and you should be fine. If they say it can't be "repaired" then that is what you should go with. A bunch of guys on a forum who can't see what you actually have can only give vague repair advice. The shop can see and do what is needed.

Brian
 
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Just take it in and be sure they have a REAL drive on frame rack with multi pull capibilities and you should be fine. If they say it can't be "repaired" then that is what you should go with. A bunch of guys on a forum who can't see what you actually have can only give vague repair advice. The shop can see and do what is needed.
Looks almost exactly like what I said from the beginiing. A far cry from,
Yes, it can be fixed, on a frame rack with experiance. I think this is a job for a body shop.
Then again, it is the typical Martinsr post. Never admit when you are wrong! Simply change the wording to make it sound differently.

Since the frame gets it's strength from the shape of the section, I would be concerned with that. If it is bent, and can be straightened, while maintaining the integrity of that boxed area, you are fine. If it is buckled, and doesn't straighten out when pulled, then you will have lost some strength. If a shop tells you they can straighten it, then fine. Let them know that you don't want them to cover it up with bondo or undercoating, or something similar, when they are done. I have seen shops cover damage with bondo and such. They say it is for appearance. It is actually so you can't see that the damage is still partly there.

Keep im mind that many frames are made in pieces that are stamped into shape, and welded together. They are not put together and then bent into shape. Damage can be in the form of bending, and also can effect the integrity of the welded areas. As an example, take a piece of cardboard and bend it into a square tube, then bend it slightly. It will straighten out, and look like new. Then take and bend it so it is out of shape. It now will not straighten out all the way, atleast not easily, and definately not where you can't see damage. You will also see that it bends alot easier now. That is basically the same deal with your frame.

Like I said before. Take it to a "qualified shop" for inspection. The level of damage, and repairability cannot be determined from "verbal inspection".

Aaron
 

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Brian Martin,Freelance adviser
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Sorry Arron, I can admit when I am wrong, my first statement is a far cry from the last. It should have been explained further.

Brian
 

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You don't mention the year, but I thnk the LUV was only available from 1979 to 1982 in 4WD form. Unless this truck is something special, I suspect that the frame repairs (done properly) would be far more expensive than the repaired truck would be worth.
 

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I-Car and the Auto Manufacturer's make frame repair recomendations not based on the skills of the actual technician doing the repair. They er on the safety side for good reason-not all technicians have the skills necessary to do some of the heavy hits. Take that truck to a good frame shop and have them give her a lookover, or maybe the shop will send someone over for any estimate.
 
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