Hot Rod Forum banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am currently a jaguar master tech at a jaguar dealership, I have been turning wrenches for 8 yrs now 4 for jag and 4 for ford. I have been thinking it's time for a change lately. So I wanted to throw the question out there and see some different opinions, What car line would be the best from a money making and working condition standpoint? I'm currently making 60-70k a yr in a well lit, air conditioned shop. The cars I work on, the lack of tech support, the constant fussing about our global warranty being to high and the low volume of cars coming through the shop are leading me to want to explore my options. So lets hear some opinions on the matter from some of the other ppl in this field.
 

·
WrenchingAce
Joined
·
116 Posts
I've never worked for a dealership before so I'm not sure what kind of politics are involved but after seventeen years of working in a couple small mechanic shops I have come to the conclusion that if I ever decided to go to work for a dealer then I'd definitely go to Ford. There never seemed to be a shortage of Ford cars and trucks coming through the shop. I'm not just saying that to degrade Ford but, in my experience, I would say I had more Fords in the shop than anything else. Since you mentioned that you already worked for Ford in the past maybe that might be a good move for you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
306 Posts
it depends on where you live, if you live in a metropolitan area, bmw or mercedes is the way to go. i work for acura (11 techs), and yeah we get some slow days... but the bmw dealer right next door (same owner) has 45 techs. they never even get a break to eat... they work all day long. infact they are moving to another location because they need more bays. so there is an opportunity to make money there. but on the otherhand you are a jaguar master tech. if you do leave and go work for bmw or anyone else, you will not be a bmw master tech so you wont get paid as one. you will be unfamilair with the product, so your flatrate time will go down until you have gotten used to it. IMO bad decision.
 

·
Get in, sit down, hang on
Joined
·
2,785 Posts
I'm a partsman, not a technician, but I have worked at Ford dealerships for a total of 14 years.

My observation, and opinion, is that dealership owners view technicians and partsmen (employees in general ... with the possible exception of salesmen) as expendable commodities and as an expense ... not an asset. They're more interested in SELLING cars than MAINTAINING them.

You hardly ever see a Ford in a dealership service department after the warranty expires ... ever wonder why?

Start your own independant repair shop, and put your money in your own pocket. Advertise your Ford and Jaguar expertise, and try to attract and hire techs like yourself. Educate yourself on Asian-produced vehicles. As much as I hate to say so ... the rice-burners are going to have the lion's share of the market.

And yes ... I am a bitter, disgruntled, ex-Ford employee. :D

Don
 

·
The AMC, FORD, & CHEVY Guy??!!
Joined
·
299 Posts
I was doing some research a few months ago on job opportunities as a mechanic and I heard good things about working for a Toyota/Lexus dealer. High pay, better benefits, nicer shops, etc. Lexus owners tend to bring their cars back to the dealer for about everything so it should be rather easy work, right? Besides, who ever heard of a dirty Lexus? Sounds like a winner to me :thumbup:



PS. I have a Ford truck I bought new and I do my own maintenance. I don't plan on taking it to the a dealer unless it is for warranty work. Cougar went to the local shop for a scan for $50 instead of the dealer for $100+.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,656 Posts
I have some experience here (as a General Manager, ex-Service Manager, ex-Parts Manager but not as a Tech)-I have spent my entire working Career in Dealerships (Automotive, Ag and Construction Equipment). I work for a Company that has four Dealerships (I manage two of them)-

To me it isn't about the Brand, it's about the Ownership, Pay Plan, Reputation in the Community, Service Advertising and attitude towards Employees, Business and Customers(and in that order). All of these contribute to the Dealership's ability to attract Service Business.

I have administered many, many different Tech Pay Plans-they can be designed in favor of the Dealership (usually), the Employee (not very often), or both (sometimes).

I think 78novaman has it right-talk to Tech's working at the other Dealerships-things aren't always as rosy as they seem-we have a high-profile Chevy Dealer in our Town who on the surface seems like he's doing well but we constantly have his Tech's over here wanting to work for us-why? I think it has to do with our Service Manager-a fantastic, helping, hard-working type who pulls for his guys, keeps Customers' happy and has been with us over 20 Years. By the way, they are getting ready to close the Chevy Dealership's doors because he is behind on his 40 Million Dollar loan-
 

·
Blowin' it
Joined
·
413 Posts
We (Ford Dealer) have been somewhat buried recently. I am a service manager, working under a fixed ops director. We thought it was going to slow down 3 months ago, but has seemed to be more busy, a lot more than normal. My worry is the amount of vehicles being sold new, major drop for us, we seem to by carrying the place. What is going to happen with the lack of new vehicles being sold? We have a huge customer base that are out of warranty and continue to let us take care of there cars/trucks, but what about the lack of new warranty vehicles?

I have some people I know working for domestics, BMW, Mercedes and Lexus. They all seem to be pretty happy with what they are making. Your big BMW and the like send you to specialty schools, they also seem to take very good care of their techs. Most of our techs are well taken care of, the average seems to be in the 15 year range for employment. We must be doing something right.
 

·
doesn't play well with others
Joined
·
1,823 Posts
I spent about ten years at a Ford dealership before moving. I have been at the Chevy, Buick, and Pontiac dealership for over two years now. Personally, I still miss Ford. They all have their pros and cons but I really can't stand GM's service manuals. They just plain suck, blatant mistakes, missing information, etc.. GM has about a million Special Service tools which really sucks when you work in a shop that almost all of those tools are missing from the toolroom when you need them. There's just a lot of little things that I can't even think of at the moment that anoy me a lot of the time. So why do I work there? Some things are more important than little annoyances. I work with a great group of guys. We are one of the only non-flatrate dealerships in the area, no constant push to play beat the clock and if the work load is light I still get paid no matter what. We have pretty good job security at my shop, which I can't say for a lot of the other dealerships in the area. These are all important things when you have a family to feed. For six months after I moved I worked at a Toyota dealership. Flat rate with lots of potential. The ratio of warranty to cash pay work was excellent. Down side was the manager sucked and overloaded the shop with techs. Half of the time we ran out of work by lunch time. From week to week I never knew how my paycheck was going to be. What you do is your choice but the grass always seems greener on the other side, meaning we sometimes assume it will be better somewhere else and it isn't always the case.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top