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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm doing a project in my heated Garage. Any opinions on the best Rattle can 2k epoxy primer?
Rustoleum?
Spray max?
Other?
Plan is to paint with rustoleum protective enanel, or better if I can find it in a rattle can. Opinions?

This will be over a baked enamel finish with a few bare spots. I'll sand and prep well. I have heard to rough up the baked enamel with 180 -200, and paint straight over it, and only primer the bare metal after it's prepped. Any opinions? These are retro steel cabinets from the late 1940s, that aren't in bad shape. I'm only painting the shown areas as the backs and insides are in good shape. I'm not looking for appearance perfection. I am going to do a nice job, and want it to last. It would be a PIA to re do.

I've read a lot all over, and know many here forgot more then most ever knew.

When I get my 70 Dart back after more then 30 years, I hope to learn a bunch here.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I thought some would have experience and preference with rattle can 2 k epoxy that they would share. I used spray max 2k on another project a few years ago, and it seems to be holding up. As steel is steel, and prone to rust, I just wondered if there was better for the long haul.
I apologize I thought bringing back something 80 + years old, might warrant a comment or 2. I'll keep any future questions I might have to my car, when I get it back.
 

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the 'Duracell Project'
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epoxy is 2 part, rattle can is 1 part, there is no 1 part epoxy that i know of
there's so much thinner that each paint layer almost non-existent
my preference is to brush on anything non-automotive
brush on is a whole can of spray in one layer
 

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Rod...from a Chrysler?
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I thought some would have experience and preference with rattle can 2 k epoxy that they would share. I used spray max 2k on another project a few years ago, and it seems to be holding up. As steel is steel, and prone to rust, I just wondered if there was better for the long haul.
I apologize I thought bringing back something 80 + years old, might warrant a comment or 2. I'll keep any future questions I might have to my car, when I get it back.
Being a member here, fear not about what questions you ask.
If you want to paint a white stripe down your cat's back, we'll try to help to make sure that strip sticks. :ROFLMAO:

2K in a spray bomb?
I've heard of this before, but never seen it. Sounds expensive.

The thing is I'm sure most here have mixed our epoxy and hardener and used the spray gun.

You need to be sure whatever you apply to such old paint doesn't cause it to bubble up and melt.
That's what would worry me.

If these are being used inside, a regular 1K spray bomb would be fine. It would also allow a test to see if it peels the old paint without wasting a whole 2K spray bomb.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the replies. Unfortunately I am using rattle cans. I don't have the equipment. I spent 2 years collecting these cabinets, firstly because they are metal, and mouse proof. Secondly because they will be installed as an outside kitchen under the back end of a covered patio, and they are mouse proof. Third because they are old and cool looking. We simply extended our trusses out 20ft past the end of the gable end cabin, and supported with post and beam, and a concrete patio. There were wood cabinets in the old cabin, and the relentless mice chewed right through them.
I have painstakingly mouse proofed the new cabin.

The 2k rattle can stuff is pricey, but it appears cheaper then setting up and learning how to use spray equipment, buying the components, and the mixing and cleaning.
This was my plan.
The best 2k rattle can epoxy primer, used mainly where I will have prepped bare metal.
Rough up the primer and baked enamel, with 200 gritt which overall is in pretty good shape.
Clean well.
Spray base color (1k rustoleum protective enamel), over primer and roughed up baked enamel.
Let it gas off. ( How long to gas off before clear)
Spray 2 coats of 2k rattle can clear over paint. (Wet on wet?)
Let dry, then turn up heat in my garage to about 80 degrees for 24 hrs.
I will only be painting the doors, and outer exposed areas. The insides, and hidden areas are still in good shape, and should be for many years. I have an old heavy duty garment rack for hanging everything.

I'm thinking this would be like painting a fender over enamel, with some bare metal, on an old car x 9 times.
Approximately 100 hrs. of labor plus set up and dry times. I'm thinking.
The difference being, a durable finish without worrying about perfectly smooth mirror finish, and the sand blasting of the road.

Thanks again
 

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Rod...from a Chrysler?
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Let the first coat of clear flash for 15 - 20 minutes unless the can has different instructions.
Go a little rougher for the epoxy stage. 180 grit for good tooth. Spray epoxy and then sand with 240 and then 320.
 

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Rod...from a Chrysler?
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The bubbling is still a concern. Can you hit a bit on the back, wait 1/2 hour or so before you do the exposed surfaces?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Yes I can pugsy. Do you think the epoxy primer might bubble the baked enamel?

Would a 150 grit give me better bite for primer?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I can 2k epoxy all the baked enamel. Should I,,, or should I use the old enamel as primer, after it's prepped, and save some cash. The extra $100 for primer is not as important as long term durability.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I was told the old enamel will work well as the primer, but not from someone who would have the knowledge of some here.
 

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Rod...from a Chrysler?
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Yes I can pugsy. Do you think the epoxy primer might bubble the baked enamel?

Would a 150 grit give me better bite for primer?
150 is better of course.
 

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Rod...from a Chrysler?
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I can 2k epoxy all the baked enamel. Should I,,, or should I use the old enamel as primer, after it's prepped, and save some cash. The extra $100 for primer is not as important as long term durability.
Epoxy locks out moisture. For durability, you're on the right track.
 

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Rod...from a Chrysler?
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I was told the old enamel will work well as the primer, but not from someone who would have the knowledge of some here.
I'm no expert, so take my advise at your own risk.
If it were me, old paint, I would not trust if I was worried about corrosion.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I appreciate the impute. So what your saying is the paint on paint might react, primer is safer?
 

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Rod...from a Chrysler?
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Just looked at that drivel I wrote above. I don't even understand it.
That was supposed to say that epoxy offers more corrosion protection than paint on paint.
 

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Rod...from a Chrysler?
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Even better would be to strip the old paint, 80 grit the bare metal and then epoxy followed by enamel.
 
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
LOL, very loudly. A buddy has a blast and powder coat business. I bought some aircraft stripper, and tried it on an extra cabinet. He was going to just soft blast off the residue and oxidization then treat and powder coat. The steal on shelves and walls is too thin to blast the paint off, without metal damage, or 100s of hours shop time $. This baked enamel is tough, I got some off but it was a fight. I layered thick, and covered with plastic over night, scraped like h, and then did it again. Again it would be hundreds of hours, and thousands of dollars for stripper up here. I wish there was a 1k spray can primer that could actually seal, but I know I'm dreaming. I'm going to finish with 2k clear, for better wear and tear.
 

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Rod...from a Chrysler?
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How much time do you get for the epoxy once activated?

I'm thinking, prep everything, and if you have a few hours time, if you test spray doesn't peel in an hour, you may be good to go.
But if it were me and my luck, it would start bubbling after an hour and 15 minutes after I sprayed all over.
 
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