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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm doing a project in my heated Garage. Any opinions on the best Rattle can 2k epoxy primer?
Rustoleum?
Spray max?
Other?
Plan is to paint with rustoleum protective enanel, or better if I can find it in a rattle can. Opinions?

This will be over a baked enamel finish with a few bare spots. I'll sand and prep well. I have heard to rough up the baked enamel with 180 -200, and paint straight over it, and only primer the bare metal after it's prepped. Any opinions? These are retro steel cabinets from the late 1940s, that aren't in bad shape. I'm only painting the shown areas as the backs and insides are in good shape. I'm not looking for appearance perfection. I am going to do a nice job, and want it to last. It would be a PIA to re do.

I've read a lot all over, and know many here forgot more then most ever knew.

When I get my 70 Dart back after more then 30 years, I hope to learn a bunch here.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I thought some would have experience and preference with rattle can 2 k epoxy that they would share. I used spray max 2k on another project a few years ago, and it seems to be holding up. As steel is steel, and prone to rust, I just wondered if there was better for the long haul.
I apologize I thought bringing back something 80 + years old, might warrant a comment or 2. I'll keep any future questions I might have to my car, when I get it back.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the replies. Unfortunately I am using rattle cans. I don't have the equipment. I spent 2 years collecting these cabinets, firstly because they are metal, and mouse proof. Secondly because they will be installed as an outside kitchen under the back end of a covered patio, and they are mouse proof. Third because they are old and cool looking. We simply extended our trusses out 20ft past the end of the gable end cabin, and supported with post and beam, and a concrete patio. There were wood cabinets in the old cabin, and the relentless mice chewed right through them.
I have painstakingly mouse proofed the new cabin.

The 2k rattle can stuff is pricey, but it appears cheaper then setting up and learning how to use spray equipment, buying the components, and the mixing and cleaning.
This was my plan.
The best 2k rattle can epoxy primer, used mainly where I will have prepped bare metal.
Rough up the primer and baked enamel, with 200 gritt which overall is in pretty good shape.
Clean well.
Spray base color (1k rustoleum protective enamel), over primer and roughed up baked enamel.
Let it gas off. ( How long to gas off before clear)
Spray 2 coats of 2k rattle can clear over paint. (Wet on wet?)
Let dry, then turn up heat in my garage to about 80 degrees for 24 hrs.
I will only be painting the doors, and outer exposed areas. The insides, and hidden areas are still in good shape, and should be for many years. I have an old heavy duty garment rack for hanging everything.

I'm thinking this would be like painting a fender over enamel, with some bare metal, on an old car x 9 times.
Approximately 100 hrs. of labor plus set up and dry times. I'm thinking.
The difference being, a durable finish without worrying about perfectly smooth mirror finish, and the sand blasting of the road.

Thanks again
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Yes I can pugsy. Do you think the epoxy primer might bubble the baked enamel?

Would a 150 grit give me better bite for primer?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I can 2k epoxy all the baked enamel. Should I,,, or should I use the old enamel as primer, after it's prepped, and save some cash. The extra $100 for primer is not as important as long term durability.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I was told the old enamel will work well as the primer, but not from someone who would have the knowledge of some here.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I appreciate the impute. So what your saying is the paint on paint might react, primer is safer?
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
LOL, very loudly. A buddy has a blast and powder coat business. I bought some aircraft stripper, and tried it on an extra cabinet. He was going to just soft blast off the residue and oxidization then treat and powder coat. The steal on shelves and walls is too thin to blast the paint off, without metal damage, or 100s of hours shop time $. This baked enamel is tough, I got some off but it was a fight. I layered thick, and covered with plastic over night, scraped like h, and then did it again. Again it would be hundreds of hours, and thousands of dollars for stripper up here. I wish there was a 1k spray can primer that could actually seal, but I know I'm dreaming. I'm going to finish with 2k clear, for better wear and tear.
 

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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
It states it's good for 4 days. My reading tells me 24 hours is pushing it. I thought about the prepping, and the coverage of a can. To test this I'm thinking to prep enough old paint surface of a cabinet I'm going to use, and the cabinet that I tried to strip that has some paint still on. Primer one side of the partially stripped ginnea pig cabinet, wait an hour or 2, and if all good, use up the rest of that can. If everything is still good after 24 hours continue prepping and priming everything, then scuff, clean, and do do the color and clear a couple at a time.

Thanks again pugsy, I'm starting to get an understanding.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
I'm sure there are others here who have rattle canned over a fender, or engine bay etc. I'm hoping someone chimes in. I'm getting a new found respect for body and paint guys, after trying to figure this out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
I probably won't be spraying a lot in the future pugsy. I'm thinking maybe a less expensive HVLP, or LVLP? I can get a 20 gallon compressor, and I have 3/8 hose. I have about 220 - 400 sq ft total, depending if I get energetic and spray the insides too, and will be doing it in about 20ft-40 +- chunks, one cabinet at a time, start to finish. I'm very good with a rattle can, and "could" figure out a spray gun before I lay anything on. My thing is longevity. It is certainly not going to take any road gravel abuse, and Sun UV will only hit the bottom 1/2, of 3 of the bottom cabinets for average 1.5 hrs a day, but I don't want to uninstall these cabinets in a couple years and redo it. Although we aren't near the coast, humidity is my concern.

These cabinets are very rare now. The actual sink unit is 5'6" wide with a porcyclin 2 sink and 2 side drain racks built into one piece. To give you an idea, I saw a similar sink unit for $2100 US, in new hampshire. The time effort, and money to finish, will be lower then what it took to collect them. I know it's not a muscle car or hotrod, but this is the place where people appreciate the old stuff.

Considering the age, (some of these date back to the late 1940s) the rust on them is not extensive, and the old baked enamel is in pretty good shape. I want to give them another life. Prep right, and now I'm thinking single stage paint, because we don't need, or really want a mirror finish anyway. Visual perfection, is not as important as durability. They are 80 years old, and I think a little visual imperfection here and there, is character.

chasracer thanks for the reply. I will be checking that out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
Finally ready to start my project in a week or so, and thought I would thank you for the feed back. Unfortunately for me my old 70 Dart went to a family member. Hopefully he brings it back to life. I tested Pro Form epoxy on the baked enamel cabinets, and it hasn't peeled or bubbled in a week. I can purchase it but the paint shop couldn't pull up a TDS. I then went to Pro Form site, and they don't list it anymore. I'm thinking product problem, so onto the next.

Any opinions on a decent epoxy primer, and single stage solid paint, that won't break the bank? I want to use a flattener to get to a satin finish. Another paint store suggested PPG Limco. I don't want it to runny. My buddy used omni a while back and said it was real thin, and prone to runs. I'm going to shoot them in his shop. He has a good compressor and gun with a 1.5 tip. I finally broke down and came to terms, that I have too many sq ft to use rattle cans. I'm thinking urethane, just for durability.
 

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Discussion Starter · #37 ·
I have a new appreciation for you body an paint people. I have gathered a lot of knowledge by reading thru this site. My thanks to those in the know who take the time to share. My Youngstown retro cabinet project got pushed back due to 89 Mom breaking her hip, and a few other things. Some of these cabinets are over 80 years old. I ended up going with Endura industrial, epoxy, and paint. 2 cheaper spray guns that are working quite well, "so far". Endura is also here in Edmonton 20 minutes away. These people are pros, and very helpful, unlike the various auto body supply stores I went to here. I made a process list, base on information from here. So far so good with some doors sprayed. Another 150 hours +-, and I will have a very old, very cool, out door, antique kitchen, at our hobby farm, that I think might even outlast my kids. Thanks again.
 
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