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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
It states it's good for 4 days. My reading tells me 24 hours is pushing it. I thought about the prepping, and the coverage of a can. To test this I'm thinking to prep enough old paint surface of a cabinet I'm going to use, and the cabinet that I tried to strip that has some paint still on. Primer one side of the partially stripped ginnea pig cabinet, wait an hour or 2, and if all good, use up the rest of that can. If everything is still good after 24 hours continue prepping and priming everything, then scuff, clean, and do do the color and clear a couple at a time.

Thanks again pugsy, I'm starting to get an understanding.
 

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'23 T-Bucket Pickup
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epoxy is 2 part, rattle can is 1 part, there is no 1 part epoxy that i know of
there's so much thinner that each paint layer almost non-existent
my preference is to brush on anything non-automotive
brush on is a whole can of spray in one layer
I’ve taken to buying a quart of Rustoleum and a quart of mineral spirits and thinning the paint just enough to spray evenly out of my HVLP gun at no more than 35 psi. It gives nice even coverage in one coat. Of course you can do more coats if desired. You can clean the gun with pump gas to save some $$.
 

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'23 T-Bucket Pickup
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I’ve taken to buying a quart of Rustoleum and a quart of mineral spirits and thinning the paint just enough to spray evenly out of my HVLP gun at no more than 35 psi. It gives nice even coverage in one coat. Of course you can do more coats if desired. You can clean the gun with pump gas to save some $$.
You will also have a lot less fumes than if using a spray can
 

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I asked a Body Shop friend of mine the same question a few years ago and his answer was there is no such thing as good rattle can paint. But I've found Sem and DupliColor to be half decent.
When you find out, let me know. What is a good spray can for exhaust parts, many manifold?
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
I'm sure there are others here who have rattle canned over a fender, or engine bay etc. I'm hoping someone chimes in. I'm getting a new found respect for body and paint guys, after trying to figure this out.
 

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True Hotrodder
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I believe you use what you have available to you. I have seen the 2k rattle can stuff but not used it. These are the cans that have the separate hardener part in the base and once you activate it, it's best to use it up. As to a rattle can primer, I have been impressed with the Rustoleum Rust Reformer. Goes on rather nicely, good coverage and it honestly protects the metal. I have a cheap HF container box on the front of my trailer. The original paint on it was letting the metal start rusting inside of a year. I bought two cans of the Rust Reformer, knocked the box down with 3M scrubbing pad from the grocery store (about 320-360 grit) and sprayed it - that was about 2 years ago, it still looks good and hasn't rusted a bit. And this is with no topcoat. So based on that the sheet metal flooring on my 2000 Ford F350 had started to show some minor rust on the edges where pieces were welded together at the factory. I purchased more of the Rust Reformer and also some Rustoleum regular rattle can in Grey - the original color of the flooring is grey. I am doing the same deal and a bit of it at a time. I knock the rust down (really minor stuff) with a 3M pad, hit it with the Rust Reformer and then when dry - actually less than about 10 minutes - I give it an hour and then topcoat it with the grey. So far it looks pretty good and gives the floor some needed protection. No point in letting it rust then having to do major surgery to repair it. And I have welders, plasma cutters, spray booth setup and big compressor, body tools, really good spray guns, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
I probably won't be spraying a lot in the future pugsy. I'm thinking maybe a less expensive HVLP, or LVLP? I can get a 20 gallon compressor, and I have 3/8 hose. I have about 220 - 400 sq ft total, depending if I get energetic and spray the insides too, and will be doing it in about 20ft-40 +- chunks, one cabinet at a time, start to finish. I'm very good with a rattle can, and "could" figure out a spray gun before I lay anything on. My thing is longevity. It is certainly not going to take any road gravel abuse, and Sun UV will only hit the bottom 1/2, of 3 of the bottom cabinets for average 1.5 hrs a day, but I don't want to uninstall these cabinets in a couple years and redo it. Although we aren't near the coast, humidity is my concern.

These cabinets are very rare now. The actual sink unit is 5'6" wide with a porcyclin 2 sink and 2 side drain racks built into one piece. To give you an idea, I saw a similar sink unit for $2100 US, in new hampshire. The time effort, and money to finish, will be lower then what it took to collect them. I know it's not a muscle car or hotrod, but this is the place where people appreciate the old stuff.

Considering the age, (some of these date back to the late 1940s) the rust on them is not extensive, and the old baked enamel is in pretty good shape. I want to give them another life. Prep right, and now I'm thinking single stage paint, because we don't need, or really want a mirror finish anyway. Visual perfection, is not as important as durability. They are 80 years old, and I think a little visual imperfection here and there, is character.

chasracer thanks for the reply. I will be checking that out.
 

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I'm doing a project in my heated Garage. Any opinions on the best Rattle can 2k epoxy primer?
Rustoleum?
Spray max?
Other?
Plan is to paint with rustoleum protective enanel, or better if I can find it in a rattle can. Opinions?

This will be over a baked enamel finish with a few bare spots. I'll sand and prep well. I have heard to rough up the baked enamel with 180 -200, and paint straight over it, and only primer the bare metal after it's prepped. Any opinions? These are retro steel cabinets from the late 1940s, that aren't in bad shape. I'm only painting the shown areas as the backs and insides are in good shape. I'm not looking for appearance perfection. I am going to do a nice job, and want it to last. It would be a PIA to re do.

I've read a lot all over, and know many here forgot more then most ever knew.

When I get my 70 Dart back after more then 30 years, I hope to learn a bunch here.
 
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