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New guy here! I am restoring a 72 Ford Capri. It has about three different colors and coats of paint. I want to strip all and shoot one nice even color of black epoxy primer. I don't have access to sand blasting nor can I afford it. I have used aircraft stripper before and if I have to, I will again. Has anyone used any other type of chemical stripper that is not as nasty as methylene chloride? Anyone tried one of the citrus strippers?

My main concern is after the paint is stripped, what do I need to wash the metal with that will definatey wash away any stripper residue? As soon as water dries, you can see faint rust almost immediately. Then what are you suppose to do?
 

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I just stripped the main body of a 49 chevy last weekend in about 5 hours time. I used a grinder with a 3M type coarse scotchbrite disc. The car had the following layers - 1 layer of sandable primer, Old DP (good stuff) Epoxy primer, yellow coat of Centari enamel, Dupont Velvaseal, 1 coat of original Chevy green paint and 1 layer of some type of yellow/white factory primer sealer. It cut through them like butter and left a very workable finish. I then hit the bare metal with a DA and 120 grit to clean up and touch up. I then coated with SPI epoxy primer.
I have read that some folks do this with a disc, something like a 120. I would never, ever use a disc for that as a disc tends to gouge and heat. I have done this type of work for years and often I have found that coarse is not always faster. Many times it is the amount of work you can get out of the abrasive is more important verses how coarse or how much it cuts. These discs are about $12.00 each and I used 2 to do the complete body. If you use this method, do not press down on the surface with your grinder, let it float at first until you get the feel. You will find that by not loading the scotchbrite type products, they will actually cut faster and last longer most of the time. Also do not run your tool back and forth like many seem to do. It just makes more work for you. Learn to use nice even passes and check for warmth of the metal. With this type of disc, you may be surprised that you have almost no heat at all to contend with. Good luck on your project.
 
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