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I am going to leave this to the experts....but in my opinion, it depends on what you are doing...

sheet metal.....mig
heavier frame work etc......arc
Brazing has its place........Tig, I know little about, but is very versitile
 

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There's a saying about this: "You don't drive railroad spikes with a tacking hammer and you dont do finish nails with a sledgehammer". In other words, it depends on what you are doing and it also depends on your welding rig.

IMO, and I am NOT a pro but I have done MIG, Gas, and Arc the break down is like this:
Mig: great for sheet and can do heavier metals with a good welder. relatively easy to learn.
Arc: great for plate and thick steel. relatively hard to learn.
Gas: Very versatile with a proper array of tips and a large bottle. "in the middle" in terms of difficultly. Special note: gas is the slowest method of welding but you have a lot of control over what is going on.

TIG: I have not done TIG, but everything I've seen/heard describes it as the Rolls-Royce of welding. With a good unit; extremely versatile, faster then gas, but slower then MIG. The problem? Good TIG units are not cheap (last I checked).
 

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For bigginers, mig welding is the easiest to learn,and its the most versatile way to weld. Arc welding is what they have you do at a welding school first,if you can arc weld,then you can mig weld. Tig welding is the best way to weld,but it takes alot of expierience to master it. :pimp: Depends on what you want to weld. :pimp:
 

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I'd agree with what you've already been told. Can you tell us more about what you want to weld? That way we can give you more specific answers. You say you are new to the welding industry....do you mean you are interested in industrial type welding, or just new to welding in general? Since you are asking in a hotrodding forum, I'll assume you are interested in welding as it applies to building hotrods, etc.
Sheetmetal work, like on an auto body, would best be served with a Mig. Ideally it would have a spot timer, which shuts it on and off at a set time period, which makes it easier to spot weld in body panels. Not actually needed though.
Tig welding is probably the most versatile, although it is also the most difficult to learn....you have to use both hands, along with eye/hand coordination.....sounds easy, but IS more difficult than you might think. Just takes practice. If you've gas welded before then you have the same skills needed to Tig. Tig is great for roll cages, exotic metals, and most other auto "specialty" situations.
Most Tig machines let you arc weld too.
 

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Tig is by far the best.. You need to be very good with two hands.. :D Lot harder to learn then MIG.... :D But MIG is just as good and also a lot faster..when done right.. :thumbup:
 

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JohnBrayan said:
I am new to welding industry and i want to know which is the best welding process?

Any help/ information would be great!
Welcome to welding. I weld almost everyday. The best welding process is going to be determined by what you are welding. I weld mostly with MIG, TIG, and Oxy/Acet. If you are a beginner I would definitely reccommend a MIG. And, as all welding goes practice makes perfect. Lincoln makes great starter welders like the sp-175t. If you're looking into buying a starter welder look into the sp-175t, It opperates on 220v and accepts 70/30 argon/co2 mix. From my experience you can weld up to 1/4"-3/8" plate easily with it. Hope this helps.
 

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All of the above is great advice. I'd only add to: depending on what you're working on. For sheet metal work, I'd tend to stay away from torches. I know, brazing has been done for years; I've done it myself.

The torch spreads out much more heat over a wide area, and can lead to warping on sheet metal; making the body work part of the job more difficult.

On thin stuff, especially a beginner, a MIG works great. And with experimentation, can lead to welds with nearly no distortion.
 
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