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Doing bondo work and think I screwed up. I had sanded the metal till its was shinny with no paint, put the bondo on but the hole wasnt getting fully covered so i scraped it onto the hole and left it. Still wet and looks like the holes are still their did I screw up or is that normal??
 

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If the bondo is still wet, yeah you goofed up a bit. No fear I is here!

Sanding the spot to the bear metal was good, but if the bondo is still wet that means that you didn't add any hardener to the filler. Scrape that gunk off, clean it up and start over.

Where is the damaged area? How bad is it? Let me know and I'll tell you exactly what to do step by step. I'll help you with any auto body work you have, just tell me and I'll tell you all you need to know.

Faust
 

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In addition to Hallo's advice, I recomend against using Bondo brand or any other brand of filler that is white with a colored hardner. They tend to bleed thru a paint job after time and cause dark spots. I like a product called AllMetal or RealMetal or something like that (I am not at home to look at the can and am over 50 - mind is going fast!). Comes in a silver can at better auto paint stores. The filler is aluminum colored and the catalyst is clear. When hardened it looks exactly like a leaded patch. Hardens much harder than Bondo type fillers so is more like the base metal.

[ July 12, 2002: Message edited by: [email protected] ]</p>
 

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A good grade of bondo won't bleed, but just to be sure always use a sealer before you paint. As for filling a hole with bondo, I hope you mean a shallow place and not a hole you can see through. If it is a hole, then you need to weld a patch over it or you're just wasting your time filling it. Won't hold any longer than it takes to fix it.
 

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A joke about putting bondo in without hardner. A lot of years ago I worked for a Pontiac dealer that took a 63 Comet hardtop in trade. Other than a few warps in a quarter panel, the car looked real clean with new lavender paint. The guy said he and his son had done the work on it. Well, my boss brought it in the shop and started showing me the warps he wanted taken out. Then he turned around and leaned on it and slid about a foot down the quarter. It had been flattened real good and the people had put about 3 gallon of bondo in it without any hardner and painted over it. I never did figure out just how they got it to stay put long enough or smoothed up enough to paint. They got a pretty good trade in though..
 

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One thing to remember when sanding. DO NOT sand with fine sandpaper. You stated you sanded until shiny. When sanding use a coarse disc or paper. The bondo needs to have some teeth to adhere to. I also would shy away from the brand name Bondo. A good filler to use is AllMetal. It has actual aluminum in it, is water proof, will not bleed thru, and is tough. No filler is really made for filling holes. To properly fill in a hole it should have a piece of metal cut to the same size as the hole, welded in, then use a good brand of filler. If you want to go the cheaper route and do not or cannot get the hole welded, then get some fiberglass patch and cover the hole from the backside and use the filler on the frontside to smooth out. Also no filler should be over 1/8" thick or you will be susceptible to cracking later on down the road. Hope this helps.

Kevin
 

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I have used featherlite with some decent results and epoxy based glaze-pin hole fillers are the best. Definitely stay away from Bondo brand and the red stuff glazes they will shrink over time and you will have dimples where it was flat. Dont ask me how i know
 

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okay, i'm sold on All-metal--for my next vehicle anyway,( my 90 yr old landlord used that all metal ALL OVER his van 5 years ago and it still looks great and i guarantee you its 1/2" thick in places) but in the meantime. filler should be no thicker than 1/8" per layer right?, not total overall thickness? and you can fill small holes, ala screw size as long as it squirts thru the other side, yea or nea?
 

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It is 'good practice' to not have the filler thicker than 1/8" total. Good body men use it like heavy primer over their work (only a few 1000ths thick) and purists don't use any filler at all, just perfect metal work! Obviously, there is a happy medium for the use of filler. Anyone should be able to knock sheet metal to within 1/8" before using filler. It is worth the effort. In summary, the thinner the better. Why not just spot the holes with braze or if you aren't comfortable with that much heat and danger of warpage, a wirefeed welder with a tab of sheetmetal behind the hole and not take a chance? Anytime you have unsupported filler, Murphy is likely to show up and have it pop out.

[ July 24, 2002: Message edited by: [email protected] ]</p>
 
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