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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I bought a 89 c30(R3500) last week. It needs a few small things and one of those things is the brakes.

Normally not a big deal. But the rear wheel cylinders have maybe a inch tops of clearence between the bleeder and spring pack. I played with this before. I basically make a wrench from scratch to fit up inside there.

But, if I need to go in there anyway then why not make it easier next time.

So I am thinking of a 4 to 6" long flexible line would get me above that spring pack and make bleeding these drums easier.

One of those things you expect to find already out. Maybe I am just searching wrong. But I am not finding it.

All I need is a line that screws into the bleeder perferably with a angled swivel. If I need to build one I will. But I usually find these things already available after building them and kick myself.
 

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Old(s) Fart
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I'm guessing this is a cab/chassis model with the narrow dually axle. On my truck, I found that the easiest thing to do was to remove one of the u-bolts holding the spring to the axle pad. This gave me enough room to get in from one side to bleed the rear brakes. I've got a Vacula vacuum bleeder, so it goes really quickly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
What I am working with:
617645


9 leafs with 2 additional for overload.
I played with it before on other C/C it just requires a "custom" wrench to be made. That "works". But is still a pain.
 

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Having encountered my share of rusted / frozen bleeder screws , what's your go to , penetrating oil , heat ? How about never seize on the threads during reassembly ?
 

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Having encountered my share of rusted / frozen bleeder screws , what's your go to , penetrating oil , heat ? How about never seize on the threads during reassembly ?
Yes, I always put a dab of anti-seize on the bleeder threads. Also on the threads of brake line flare nuts and especially between the ID of the flare nut and the outside of the brake tube. I've found that rust between the flare nut and the tube is the main reason why older lines twist when you go to remove them. Obviously take care not to get anti-seize on the sealing surfaces that see brake fluid.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Lots of pentrating oil on everything a few days before working on it. This has half a can already I just did not get to the backing plates before I ran out.

Lines are cheap. I usually just cut it then slide a socket over.

I need to make room in the garage this weekend for this pile. The axle tubes coming out requires some room. But doing this inside will keep Karens from complaining.

Going to grab some "good" wheel cylinders. Once I know the thread pitch I should be able to find a 90 degree block that is 1/2 to 3/4" that I can screw in and add a 5" tube onto with a bleeder at the top.

Simple fix to eliminate this headache(and make future bleeding easy). It is going to take a bit of expermenting to find a block that will work. But plenty doable. Just figured someone would have done it already.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Match the thread pitch of the wheel cylinder's old bleeder with a tube at 0 degrees that screws into a brass block with another tube at 90 degrees going to the new bleeder.

I dont see why it will not seal as long as I match the bleeder thread pitch. But thats also why I am asking about a aftermarket fix or a wheel cylinder with a extention already attached.

One of these things I really should have my lathe set up and running for. But I think I can do it with a threading kit, hand tools, and a vise. I should be able to build it on a bench then snake the assembled thing through the backing plate hole so everything is tight.

It is something that might be $2 for a manufacturer to make that I would have gladly paid $10 for.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I made a disc brake setup years ago on a 84 c30 that used the factory 16" rims. I grinded the heck out of those GM monte carlo calipers. But they cleared. Apparently you need to use a 1.5" spacer to do it "right".

I will probally spend $4-600 to go disc on this eventually. I will just grind down the calipers because I hate spacers. But right now I just want to refresh the stock drums to make this thing stop.

One of those things I figured it would be something I could just order. But if it is going to cause leaks then I will just make a long wrench.

I am open to ideas and am glad I am getting good smart feedback. But never expected this would be such a pain to fix this issue.

I need to get those drums off. If they are toast then I might go disc now(it will cut into the s10 budget). If the drums are good I can do rear pads, wheel cylinders, with a rear axle line and have this stopping for less then $150. That should give me a year or two of drive time before doing a disc swap.
 

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Match the thread pitch of the wheel cylinder's old bleeder with a tube at 0 degrees that screws into a brass block with another tube at 90 degrees going to the new bleeder.

I dont see why it will not seal as long as I match the bleeder thread pitch. But thats also why I am asking about a aftermarket fix or a wheel cylinder with a extention already attached.

One of these things I really should have my lathe set up and running for. But I think I can do it with a threading kit, hand tools, and a vise. I should be able to build it on a bench then snake the assembled thing through the backing plate hole so everything is tight.

It is something that might be $2 for a manufacturer to make that I would have gladly paid $10 for.
Not sure if you have heard of them, but Dorman makes a generic bleeder with a check valve on it. Currently going for about $13 per pair at your local parts store. I got mine at AutoZone.
 

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Straight cut threads don't seal ! AFAIK..At any rate , I wouldn't trust them for a brake system ..
Exactly. Bleeders are tapered at the tip to seal into a tapered seat. No sealer that I’ve ever seen or used will seal straight threads. Brake systems use upward of 1500 psi.
 
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