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Discussion Starter #1
This is off a 17hp (not 100% if that's correct rating) single cylinder briggs engine... it's a reman longblock, 4 years old. My (real)dad said he has never seen a head gasket come off like this in his entire life, we assume it to be a pos gasket.

Thought the pics would be interesting. The pic of the cylinder head clearly shows where the leak was. Feel free to comment- I think he should have rebuilt the engine himself, so he knows it's done right... he has 3 other simplicity tractors pretty similar to it already (and a bunch of farmalls and a single oliver)
-matt
 

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ChevelleSS_LS6,

I have seen this many times. It is caused from heat build-up. Check the flywheel cover and see if there is something restricting the air flow. Flat sand the head and the block before you put this engine backt together.

Good Luck
Scholman
 

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World Class ASE tech
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Looks like a stock Briggs head gasket. You have to keep after the head bolts on a air cooled engine. A belt sander will fix the head, just don't take a lot off the head.
 

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Head gasket

ChevelleSS_LS6 said:
This is off a 17hp (not 100% if that's correct rating) single cylinder briggs engine... it's a reman longblock, 4 years old. My (real)dad said he has never seen a head gasket come off like this in his entire life, we assume it to be a pos gasket.

Thought the pics would be interesting. The pic of the cylinder head clearly shows where the leak was. Feel free to comment- I think he should have rebuilt the engine himself, so he knows it's done right... he has 3 other simplicity tractors pretty similar to it already (and a bunch of farmalls and a single oliver)
-matt
Matt I have been building Briggs kart racing engines for 15 years. It is the stock Briggs gasket. They usually come apart like that after they have been in service for a long time, whether they are blown or not. If you coat it with a little motor oil when you put them on it will be ok. Torque it to speck and it will be good to go. On a racing engine I will Mill it flat and take whatever amount I need for the compression I want.
Later, Ron
 

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Discussion Starter #6
how much is safe to remove for higher-compression? Is it a good idea to slightly round the edge of the cylinder bore to improve airflow from the valves to the cylinder? What about general head porting for stock/slightly increased rpm applications? Any other tricks?

that aside, the engine in the pics is on my (real dads) simplicity used for tilling and stuff. It's a 4yr old reman shortblock, and I'm not 100% sure if he tightened down the bolts after a couple hours of break-in. I'd assume he did (he grew up around engines and farm tractors).... might've just been a bad gasket.
 

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You said that it was 4 years old.....my thinking is...if it were a bad gasket it would have showed up long before 4 years. Just replace the gasket and get back to using the engine.
 

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You will have best of luck using a copper head gasket over the fabric type gasket. It will handle the heat longer when lack of ventilation is present.
 

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Head Gasket

Do not use a copper head gasket. You must have perfect surfaces on the block and head. The stock gasket will work fine. Retorque the head bolts after first run with the engine warm but touchable.
 
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