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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,

Snapped off the damn bleeder screw on my truck. Did a 24hr soak and heat and CRC freeze spray then tried a bolt extractor which eventually snapped in the hole.

So no I am down to welding a washer and nut to see if I can pull the bleeder out. I have access to a 90amp flux and and a new mig welder (No gas).

One of the few things I have not done on a car is welding. Can anyone recommend which welder to use in this case? What material should the nut be made of or any other tips and tricks they can share.

I was going to torch the screw area with my acetylene torch but it was out of oxygen and I needed to get it done which clearly failed.
 

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Hotrodders.com Moderator
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X2...... wheel cylinders are cheap.Just replace it.

Chances are it will start leaking anyhow if you keep messing with it.
 

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X3, i.e. Poncho and LATECH
Not worth the aggravation - get a remanufactured caliper from someplace like NAPA or Rock Auto for not much money.
 

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The trick is not to break the bleeder off on the first place. I worked in one place, total taboo to bust off a bleeder screw. If you were going to replace a wheel cylinder, it didn't matter. To this day, I check them first thing when I do brakes. Apply a little heat with a map gas torch usually does the trick.
 

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I'll also add that welding on the bleeder screw is a great way to heat damage the rubber seals inside the wheel cylinder or caliper. Plus, if it's that rusty, the bore can't be in that great a shape either.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
My olds man harbor freight 90 amp welder got the job done. First I practiced on another set of calipers I had that also had a broken bleeder. Grinding down the top of the left over screw it was flush. Took me 4 times but welding a washer to what's left of the screw and building a small bead and then welding the nut worked. That bleeder was flush and small.

I then took that experience and did it on my truck. Took 3 times. I used a bigger nut and the washer was perfect size around the stub that was left. The one on the truck also had a bolt extractor cracked off (hardened steel). So again took my grinder cleaned the stub then put the washer, tacked and then built a little bead then put on the nut and welded the inside and built up making the nut orange from the heat. That heat is good because I am sure it caused expansion. Let it cool. Then this was also key, I used my dewalt impact gun and impact socket. A few small taps off then on then off etc 5 times or so. Boom got both bleeder off.

I have been working on cars a long time, yes I know the key is not to break the bleeder in the first place. I lubricated the bleeders over night but the previous owner apparently He or the shop that did the brakes never put that one dust cap back on. So I am sure water probably got up in there over time causing that one to stick. All others had caps and no issues.

This was my first time messing with the welder, I had it on MAX and wire speed was set to 2. If anyone finds this thread down the line, also read that when loosening the bleeder it might be smart to put a nail or anything nice and snug in the hole so when you spin the bleeder, it won't collapse like a straw. I don't know if that was the issue with mine, but just food for thought.

A few have mentioned heat, I am sure you are all aware that brakes are made for high heat right? The amount of heat that was used the put the nut on was not done for a huge amount of time, I think in total it was maybe 20 seconds with a pause. I will be putting in new fluid tomorrow but based on all the videos from old timers on youtube, I doubt I will have any issues tomorrow.
 
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