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I have a 67 Chevelle with a 327 engine and a 2 speed power glide tranny. I went to start it the other day and the starter just ran without engaging the engine. When I got the car up on stands I found my starter hanging from one bolt and found that the other bolt had blown out the side of the starter boss. I have a high torque starter. I understand that this may be a common problem on older Chevy engines. I don't think that I can weld the block but wondered if anyone knew of a fix for this without pulling the motor and getting a new 327.
Help please!
 

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I know its a little late for this, but they make those torque stoppers for high torque starters. It is a bump stop basically that bolts to the block on top of the starter about half way down the "bottle" of the starter. I know they used to have them on most blocks and the looked like a giant wing nut, lol. I had an old 350 that had the same problem, my buddy at a machine shop made a starter holder that bolts into the hole that that torque stopper bolted into, it was just a piece of aluminum that was square about 1/2 an inch thick, with a big circle notch taken out of it that fit perfect around that starter. It helped a little to hold it up but it stopped it from moving all together during cranking. See if you can make something that bolts into the holes around the starter to stabilize it. Just an idea!!!
 

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Like has already been stated, do a search on this forum, there are a hundred similar posts. If the block is really MESSED up, I normally tell guys to go with the starter adapter plate made for the early 265's; when a more modern trans is wanted/needed behind those engines. It sandwiches between the block and trans, you must use a 168 tooth flexplate AND an early style bellhousing mount 3 bolt starter; the starter then bolts to the plate, which is like 1/4" thick blanchard ground steel. Then be sure to use the starter support bracket also mentioned. The adapter runs about $100.00 from any of the tri-five vendors, and works just fine to save an otherwise good block. The added benefit, is the starter can work more effectively (torquewise) with a 168 tooth flexplate; your engine most likely has a 153 tooth flexplate on it now.
 

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F-BIRD'88 said:
This is the reason I aways recomend you install (re-install) the factory OEM rear starter motor mounting brace/bracket. ( These brackets are installed on all motors from the factory), but many people leave them off when servicing the starter motor. The two starter bolts alone are not enough to support the starter. The rear bracket keeps the starter from torqing, avoiding tearing the starter bolts out of the block.

Only a few bucks for a new on at a GM parts dealer.

Very true.
 

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starter

The 3 bolt starter I am talking about is a standard oem starter that bolts to the block,if your block is drilled for both chevy starters bolt patterns it uses 3 bolts instead 2 so you could use 2 bolts in the block
 

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SDLuck said:
The 3 bolt starter I am talking about is a standard oem starter that bolts to the block,if your block is drilled for both chevy starters bolt patterns it uses 3 bolts instead 2 so you could use 2 bolts in the block
I think the "3 bolt" starter you're referring to will ALSO require a 168 tooth flexplate. It's also a different style 3 bolt starter than the one I was mentioning, one that would bolt to a bellhousing. And, both are easy to find. Anyway, you've got your work cut out for you, good luck.
 
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