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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hey there one and all
new to cads not hot rodding wrenched for to many years to wanna-talk about just went into the cnc machining trade for a small company loving lots . but personally cant stop wrenching which brings me to my latest projects. found a few cad motors real cheap and want to find out they are .
the best looking heads are #1602493 block#1486200 where can I find id charts. there are more complete motors to be had cheap. thanks in advance for any and all help Drdreads. dr of metal fuel in vein's
 

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Footstomper
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271 Posts
Cadillac motor numbers

The first number, I do not know what it is, but the second number is ending with 6200, I have a 500 with that number on it, it could also be a 472. You can figure out whether is it a 472 or 500 by measuring the stroke. Remove the spark plug, turn the motor (If it is not frozen), to top dead on the piston, and mark it on a long phillips screw driver with a file, I used my fingernail on the screw driver shaft in the plug hole, then make a mark where my fingernail was. Then turn the motor with the piston all the way down, use your screw driver to establish that it is at the bottom, once there, use your fingernail and make another mark. Measure the distance between to get the stroke. a 472 will be 4 1/8" or slightly less, and the 500 will be 4 1/4" or more.
The 6200 is unusual, most all are 5200 at the end of the bellhousing number. I was told by CAD 500 website that the 6200 could have been a front wheel drive vehicle, aircraft motor or a Rolls Royce. In my case, it had a long turbo 400 behind it, and it had never been taken apart. They are good for about 150 or 200 dollars. It is good horse power with great reliability. When that first 472 came out, the prototype was tested for 500,000 miles! Before they put them into production. They stopped production in 1977, and went with a 425, (looks just like a 475/500 except some weird box over the bellhousing casting, just below the intake manifold, and I think the intake is a single plane as opposed to the 472/500's dual plane. They also started with the new 368, these later motors are good, but not the torque monsters of the earlier big motors. Check out CAD500.com
 

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Save a horse, Ride a Cowboy.
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5,122 Posts
Footstomper said:
The first number, I do not know what it is, but the second number is ending with 6200, I have a 500 with that number on it, it could also be a 472. You can figure out whether is it a 472 or 500 by measuring the stroke. Remove the spark plug, turn the motor (If it is not frozen), to top dead on the piston, and mark it on a long phillips screw driver with a file, I used my fingernail on the screw driver shaft in the plug hole, then make a mark where my fingernail was. Then turn the motor with the piston all the way down, use your screw driver to establish that it is at the bottom, once there, use your fingernail and make another mark. Measure the distance between to get the stroke. a 472 will be 4 1/8" or slightly less, and the 500 will be 4 1/4" or more.
The 6200 is unusual, most all are 5200 at the end of the bellhousing number. I was told by CAD 500 website that the 6200 could have been a front wheel drive vehicle, aircraft motor or a Rolls Royce. In my case, it had a long turbo 400 behind it, and it had never been taken apart. They are good for about 150 or 200 dollars. It is good horse power with great reliability. When that first 472 came out, the prototype was tested for 500,000 miles! Before they put them into production. They stopped production in 1977, and went with a 425, (looks just like a 475/500 except some weird box over the bellhousing casting, just below the intake manifold, and I think the intake is a single plane as opposed to the 472/500's dual plane. They also started with the new 368, these later motors are good, but not the torque monsters of the earlier big motors. Check out CAD500.com
If you can get into the spark plug holes to measure stroke the easiest way is to bring any cylinder to either TDC, measure it, and then measure its alternate cylinder. No turning involved.
 

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Save a horse, Ride a Cowboy.
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5,122 Posts
Footstomper said:
That's a good idea, it's a pain in the butt to turn one of those mills with a pair of gloves, say 10.5 to 1 to boot.
Use a breaker bar on the damper bolt head. ;)
It turns easier without plugs in it.
You still have to take some plugs out to find which cyl hits TDC first.

If you have a 10.5 engine, it probably is a 70 Eldorado 500/400 hp.
My buddy gave one away free 4 yrs ago. A running driving garage kept with 80,000 miles on it. He didn't tell me it was going....... :nono:

He donated it to charity with a $ 5000 appraisal for taxes, which means he saved about $ 500 to his pocket.... :pain:
 

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Footstomper
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271 Posts
Power handle

I guess a breaker bar is not the same as a power handle, It was real dark and all I had was a plug wrench a cell phone to see what I was looking for, and a long phillips screw drive and a 3 sided rat tail file. How's that for being prepared? My power handle is a craftsman 1/2" and about 2 feet long, that would have been great to have at that time. There again, it did not have a bolt in the crankshaft and had a 400 turbo with starter on the back end. I bought this motor for 200. It was running great in a 41 Cadillac limo. Some guys were moving the car on a trailer and did not have far to go, possibly intoxicated based on the logic. One guy says, I will get in the car while on the trailer, and I will hold the brakes, we do not need to tie it down. They went up a steep hill, and it rolled off into a deep ravine. After rolling like a hog, it looked pretty bad. So they pulled the motor out and stored it. I have it in my garage and are planning to replace my 305 (radical cam motor), to the 500. I want smooth power. I have since located a balanced/blueprinted 500 motor with mild tow cam, waiting for the dyno before purchase. It is for my 40' ford coupe.
 
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