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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have an SBC 305/5.0 that was given to me by a guy with around 30k miles on it. However, I'm having a really hard time deciphering what these casting numbers mean. I know it was made in Ontario, on July 9th, but I have never seen the FCU designation nor have I ever seen the second set of stamped numbers below it.

I can't really make out what the second numbers are, and definitely have no clue what they mean.

  • FCU designation?
  • can't make out second numbers
  • can't decipher any of it

617450
 

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More for Less Racer
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I don't want to sound like a dick, and I'm not jumping on you....but does it really matter?? You've identified it is a 305"/3.736" bore block.

It isn't like there are "more desirable" high performance 305's people would want to search for...it's a 305, they are all pretty much the same....small bore that can't support or even fit big flowing cylinder heads, they are all 2 bolt mains, all are cast cranks, small valve cylinder heads .....they are all nothing special.

on the FCU code, some of the Canadian codes don't show up in the online databases, plus there are numbers still not verified and added to the available databases, especially starting in the mid 1980's and up.
Could also be a mis-stamp from the factory....it was known to happen.

On the string right below the suffix string....I agree, never seen one with a odd slant on the letters like that....maybe a rebuilder's added stamp??
Looks like "CF 1218952" from a set of mixed font hand stamps
I have found "CF" listed as a crate motor ID string, just like the more common "CE" code warrantee and replacement "Crate"/over-the-counter engines.....but never saw that mixed font on the numbers before.

Normally, if a SBC block contains a second number string, it is a VIN derivitive to match it to a specific vehicle.
 

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That’s a serial number or some kind of VIN code not a casting number.

The number above it is an engine configuration code, the starting K is St Catherine’s, Ontario the numbers reflect a date that will make more sense if you have the block casting number off the bell housing mount. The only automotive suffix that comes close to FCU is TCU which can be a 305 or 307.

Not every engine GM makes goes into motor vehicles, they also produce engines for industrial and marine use who’s suffix codes generally don’t show up in automotive lists.

Its a 305, aside from some head’s being a little better than others there really isn’t much to distinguish them other than 86 and up use one piece rear seal and 87 up use a reverse rotation coolant pump for the sepertine drive belt system and the 305 version of the swirl port head through 95 then the 305 version of the Vortec head from 96 up. From 87 through 95 some blocks had roller cams others used a flat tappet, from 96 up all had roller cams.

Except for specific race classes not a lot going on here.

Bogie
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I don't want to sound like a dick, and I'm not jumping on you....but does it really matter?? You've identified it is a 305"/3.736" bore block.

It isn't like there are "more desirable" high performance 305's people would want to search for...it's a 305, they are all pretty much the same....small bore that can't support or even fit big flowing cylinder heads, they are all 2 bolt mains, all are cast cranks, small valve cylinder heads .....they are all nothing special.

on the FCU code, some of the Canadian codes don't show up in the online databases, plus there are numbers still not verified and added to the available databases, especially starting in the mid 1980's and up.
Could also be a mis-stamp from the factory....it was known to happen.

On the string right below the suffix string....I agree, never seen one with a odd slant on the letters like that....maybe a rebuilder's added stamp??
Looks like "CF 1218952" from a set of mixed font hand stamps
I have found "CF" listed as a crate motor ID string, just like the more common "CE" code warrantee and replacement "Crate"/over-the-counter engines.....but never saw that mixed font on the numbers before.

Normally, if a SBC block contains a second number string, it is a VIN derivitive to match it to a specific vehicle.
I'm well aware that 305s are nothing to drool over, and usually this wouldn't matter if I were building something for my 69 Camaro or late model Chevelle. But, unfortunately, the target vehicle this came out does matter. The reason, is to attempt to find out the target vehicle it came from in order to better estimate the approximate specs, valve size, and a couple other minor things like windage trays or not (without having to remove every single thing attached to degree the cam, tear down for a head check, and all that goes with it) in order to gauge what all we're have to do to it in order to use it.

305s came in horsepower ranges from 130hp all the way up to 230hp, with cams ranging from the tiny little peanut cams all the way up to beefy RV/Marine cams that change things up DRASTICALLY as far as the performance of the engine is concerned (obviously, hehe). They came with two different I/E valve sizes, some had integral windage trays and some didn't have any windage trays, and a few other small details that differ between how they came out of the factory - all dependent on the target vehicles they were going to.

This was pulled from something previously WAY back in the early 90s, put into a boat, used for 2 or 3 trips and then sat winterized for a few years. Then a buddy got it as part of an estate sale, had the boat in his garage, and then it landed on my doorstep (the boat with the engine in it). So, we're trying to determine the target vehicle it came out of to see if said target vehicle's hp/torque rating and particular specs are suitable without the hassles of too much work, to go into yet ANOTHER boat (one of my boats).

Hence, why we were trying to figure out what it came from originally (can't ask the original guy, he's passed away many years ago sadly) to determine if it's going to even be worth the effort of stripping the boat down to access the engine, pull it, and drop it in the other vessel. The boat originally had a 305 w/230hp, a pretty rowdy cam for a boat, and 416 heads. So, just trying to see how much of a downgrade it's going to be dropping this one in (because the other engine is torched/cracked block AND cracked head).

We can't use a 350 or bigger like we'd like to, because the largest engines permitted in the local yacht club's charter slips are 5.4L (just another petty stipulation to pompously set themselves "apart" from everyone else I suppose) and we're forced to participate with that yacht Club because the 75% discount we receive for tertiary business dealings is too cheap not to take advantage of.

(A lot to explain, I know, Lol. I just figured it'd be best to lay it out on why someone/me, is trying to pinpoint the origins of a chitty chitty 305 that would usually be better suited as an anchor or coffee table, lol).
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
That’s a serial number or some kind of VIN code not a casting number.

The number above it is an engine configuration code, the starting K is St Catherine’s, Ontario the numbers reflect a date that will make more sense if you have the block casting number off the bell housing mount. The only automotive suffix that comes close to FCU is TCU which can be a 305 or 307.

Not every engine GM makes goes into motor vehicles, they also produce engines for industrial and marine use who’s suffix codes generally don’t show up in automotive lists.

Its a 305, aside from some head’s being a little better than others there really isn’t much to distinguish them other than 86 and up use one piece rear seal and 87 up use a reverse rotation coolant pump for the sepertine drive belt system and the 305 version of the swirl port head through 95 then the 305 version of the Vortec head from 96 up. From 87 through 95 some blocks had roller cams others used a flat tappet, from 96 up all had roller cams.

Except for specific race classes not a lot going on here.

Bogie
Thanks man, I really appreciate the info! :)
 

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Good reason to know about the motor but it seems like a lot of work to do without tearing it down to check the condition first.
Trust no one with "it was rebuilt xxxxx miles ago" claims.
 

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How does the yacht club know how big your motor is?
do they look at the casting numbers or suffix codes?
or just do a quick visual looking at the decals on the motor.
i’d bet they can’t tell the difference between any small blocks from the 265 up to the 400.
maybe you just need to cheat a bit.
 
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