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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I wanted to know if this is a good enough welder to weld some motor mounts to a frame?? Plus i want to learn with it as well before i do actually weld the motor mounts. Was looking at the one from harbor freight the chicago electric flux 125 welder.
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If you are not an experienced welder, using MIG (with gas) will be a lot easier to learn and you will usually get smooth welds. Much harder to get clean welds only using flux wire.
 

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True Hotrodder
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Flux core welding is really intended for situations where you cannot use a shielding gas due to wind or welding location. To answer your question - yes it will weld motor mounts - will you like the results - no, will you get decent penetration - maybe if you know what you're doing. Most MIG units can swap between gas and flux welding by reversing the current, using the wire of choice and the correct sized tip for the wire. My Hobart MIG is capable of this and in situations where I have had to weld outside in windy conditions, the flux ability has come in handy. But it also takes a lot of extra work to clean it up and make it look decent.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I been hearing alot good things about mig but there expensive and truthfully not going to use it as much and if i do ot probably just only be small jobs.
 

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This YT vid is pretty good about flux core welding - might help you out a bit.

 
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks much as long as can make some good strong welds around the motor mounts im good im pretty sure it wont look good but i bet with some cleaning up it will do the job?
 

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Do NOT waste your money on a Flux Core welder of any kind or a Harbor Freight welder of any kind. You will be throwing your money away. You can probably dink and dob until you get a couple of pieces of metal to stick together and they will look terrible. There are lots of welders sitting in peoples shops because they tried to get by with cheap junk. When it comes to welding its not the same thing as buying a cheap wrench set. If you aren't willing to get a gas supported welder of decent quality, then you will never be able to weld decently. You will be surprised how many things you will make once you get a welder. Sorry I'm so adamant about this, but there are reasons why you have to have to spend some money and get a decent welder. I don't recommend the asian ones, but there are a couple of decent ones out there for about $600, or a smalll Miller/Lincoln of about 185 amps. If you get something that won't weld thicker stuff (3/16) easily......you will regret it.
 

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If you are looking for cheap structural welding, stick welding cannot be beat. But you cannot use it for body work.

I have a Neiko Tools Mig 135 which is same as the Eastwood 135 for a lot less money, but it's done a lot of work for me, however for anything structural I still need to fire up the old Lincoln Tombstone
 

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Rod...from a Chrysler?
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You say you won't use it much, but if you're welding engine mounts, you sound like a "car guy". Get something decent. A good used MIG is better than that import junk.
Check Craigslist maybe.

As mentioned, once you have it, you will use it more and more..........seems I've heard this somewhere......"build it and they will come".....
 
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Okay - enough of the BS. Too many of you are bad-mouthing something that you probably have never even tried. I have welded floor pans with a Harbor Freight flux welder - off the top of my head I don't remember the model # but like most of them, you can add a gas bottle at a later time and it's a MIG. Again it isn't the greatest but it got the job done. Can it weld the motor mounts - yes but practice on some similar thickness material to figure what it will take to get the penetration and this means welding the practice stuff, put it in a vise, cut through it, bend it to make sure it's going to stay put. It's not going to be super-pretty but practice can help with that along with some of the tips in that video I posted.

I'm not sure of your budget and I am not sure if a 240v machine is an issue either. Looking over what is available this is the one that I would say fits what you want to do:


Right now it has a $30 coupon so it's $159. Compared to what you are looking at, it's a better welder, it can do flux now, MIG later, 135a for more range and uses 110 voltage. It's only listed for 1/8 (.125) mild steel but you can usually go a bit over that and multiple passes can help. This welder is not going to do 1/4 (.250) stuff but again for the money, I think it fits your requirements.
 
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The problem with getting something with marginal or little capability is you always end up needing to weld something else thats thicker. If you have to weld something that is 1/8" thick, don't buy a welder thats rated to do 1/8...........thats its maximum. You will find lots of variation in the ability of these machines when operating at its limits. Buying a cheap welder is about the equivalent of buying a cheap condom......you will regret it later.:) Seriously though, a welder is a "lifetime" tool . Buy a good one and enjoy it forever, or scimp by and regret it. The cheap welders downsize the gun and clamp and cable. The rollers that feed the wire often slip and replacement parts aren't available. Not only is the gun smaller but the cable is shorter making it hard to get to some things. Had a friend years ago that bought a Clarke welder. Looked great in the picture. When it arrived it looked like a toy with all the undersize stuff. He was immediately disappointed with it and luckily was able to return it......but had to pay for shipping both ways. He then bought a Hobart and has been using it ever since. Hobart is like a Miller somewhat but a little less expensive. Things you won't notice are the stuff you wish you had later on. An example is the type of control knob. With many machines the knobs have distinct settings that they click to. With a better machine you have infinite control where you can make a minor adjustment. When you are welding thick stuff its less of a problem, but when you are welding thin stuff the infinite control is much better. Lots of little differences that you don't think about.
My recommendation is that you purchase a Miller (or Hobart or Lincoln or Esab) that has "Autoset". Yes it will cost more but you will love how easy it is to use for a beginner. Instead of trying to figure out what settings you need, you simply place the dial on the thickness of the material you want to weld and it adjusts for that. I bought a Miller 212 with Autoset for my son when he was in the service. He was 1800 miles away and he learned how to use it on his own prettymuch. You can also manually adjust it. He still has it and loves it. Its way more than you want to spend, but something like this one or a similar one from the manufacturers above would be great. Miller Millermatic 141 MIG Welder 907612 + FREE Miller Helmet 287803 715959598521 | eBay
I'm basically a Miller guy, but I picked up an Esab a while back because it was a good deal. I hate changing liners and rollers and tips to weld .023 wire for sheetmetal.......so I bought this and set it up just to do sheetmetal. I can swithch it to weld thicker stuff, but I have my Miller for that. This is a pretty decent welder and the customer service was great. I paid about $1K for the Esab
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Now you can save your money and take my advice, or you can get something cheap. Thats your choice. Best of luck with whatever you decide.
 

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the 'Duracell Project'
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while i'm not a fan of anything from harbor fright with a cord, i am a fan of fluxcore welders. look at any rearend, most of the brackets, backing plate flanges and spring pads are welded on with fluxcore welders. big freaking fluxcore welders. i am an experienced welder/fabricator, did stick pipe welding for a many years. stick/tig/mig/fluxcore/carbonarc fabrication.

any one that says you can't weld with fluxcore, doesn't know how to weld. as for thickness? no welder will weld 2" anything, yet 2" everything gets welded everyday with multiple passes. even sched 40 pipe is welded in 3 passes. again, a statement by a non-welder. if you've only welded with mig, your still a non-welder.

most of my hot rod 58 truk was welded with a lincoln weldpk 100 fluxcore welder. all frame modifications, including: 1/4" must II x-member, motor mounts, 700r4 x-member, full boxing of the frame, c-notch, spring pads on rear axle and brackets galore. all the bed modifications, let me say that was a lot of the welding on truk.

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Thanks all for your input.Well i guess my issue is money to buy a good one or just a decent welder. I cant see myself buying a 1000 plus dollars welder on something im just going use once this year. Besides motor mounts i mite make a battey rack or something small. Im not building frames or replace full quarter panels
 

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I used a Daytona Mig for years with superior results. The stock MII cross member in my 36 was stick welded and has been there since 1983. The Daytona welded up a complete frame from straight stock that is still on the road. A friends 29 A was welded up with a flux core dime store welder (his, me welding) in 1989 and it is still living happily ever after in MD.

My Daytona has had three large spools run through it over the years, never had an issue with it. It is now living with my brother-in-law as I decided to upgrade to a 220V Miller so I could retire the ol stick buzz box.

Bottom line, get what you think will work, practice, practice, practice, practice and practice some more. They all will do the job for the lite work we do on cars.
 

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the harbor fright welder may be exactly what you need. don't buy the welder way out front of your project, buy your steel and then buy the welder. if it does the job, your good, if not you have a warranty window to work thru. fyi buy a couple harbor fright grinders and a fist full of cut off wheels for them, probably the only thing i buy at harbor fright with a cord. they're disposable, but i'm shocked at how long they last
 

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First let me compliment "ogre" on a very nice truck and a very nice job welding it. You are correct that some high end weld processes use flux core, but they are much better machines and either robotically controlled or used by very experienced welders. Small and cheap flux machines are usually bought by inexperienced hobbiests who have problems when the flux clogs stuff up. I'm not saying you can't weld with one, but if you ask around you will find that gas supported welding is preferred by 90% (made that up) of people who use them at home. You see lots of flux core machines for resale because people want to change to gas support., or they just gave up and want to get rid of it. Your points are well made, so no disrespect intended. I just have to say that at one time everyone bought the old Lincoln Tombstone stick welders. As Mig became more affordable, people immediately saw the benefits of buying a Mig and the Tombstones are seldom seen today. Professional welders still stick weld especially on construction sites......but they have much better machines than the Tombstone and its much thicker stuff. Each type of machine has a "niche" that its "best" for. For the most part though, when given a choice between a flux machine and a gas machine, I have to say that a hobbiest will get better results with a gas machine.
 
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