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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Good afternoon
I have come across a vey very clean complete chassis, engine and trans. basically a complete 1967 corvette without the body. I think this would make a great vega base. Of coarse a lot of cutting and rebuilding would be at hand .BUT what a great finished product.
Anyone have any thoughts.
Larry
 

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The wheelbase and track width on each car are both pretty close. Should be a hoot! Check out this FB group.......
 

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Downsides: Nothing special about a mid-year 'Vette chassis/suspension (in fact they're long-ago obsolete compared to newer designs), the rails are probably too wide, the stock track width is measured with narrow wheels so expect anything wider to stick 'way out, the engine is set-back so you'll either be driving halfway from the back seat or have your feet scrunched well off to the side to clear an engine box. I think what screws up most people's ideas for a Corvette chassis (including mine, once) is the engine setback...you can't move it forward in the frame due to steering and the crossmember, and that btw is an issue with anything from '63 and newer front-engine...they're a sports car and all are built around that engine setback that won't work with a regular passenger car.

If the frame is in good shape there is a market for it among the 'Vette crowd (particularly East Coast) for replacing rusted ones.
 

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i think the track-width on the corvette is slightly wider by about 4". This may or may not be an issue, or you could put flares on, or experiment with different offsets?

Regarding the engine setback, the 4.3 v-6, as you probably know, is identical to the sbc except it's about 4.5" shorter. This may or may not help. Although, irregardless of the engine setback issue, i think this is all too much work.

P.S. Actually, i did see a picture of a monza with stretched front fenders, so i suppose you could go that route to deal with the engine setback. i'll try to look it up, but it's too much work......
 

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i mean if you are really feeling this, then fine.

i just, personally, wouldn't do it myself; i would rather just use the stock vega suspension (i agree, it's not a corvette) and either improve on it, or just leave it stock and drive it that way......
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
My currant car has a pre made chassis in it , I just thought something like this would make a second car [project more of a driver when its done. So thanks for the insight .Thats why we ask questions I guess.
 

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My currant car has a pre made chassis in it , I just thought something like this would make a second car [project more of a driver when its done. So thanks for the insight .Thats why we ask questions I guess.
Oh, don't get me wrong---i think this would be awesome. i'm just not geared, psychologically, to undertake a body-swap kind of project which is why i say i personally wouldn't do it i i were in the same situation. (well, not geared skill-wise, time-wise and money-wise either.....) . But the finished product would be wonderiferous.
 

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Actually, on second thought, now you've got me hooked. (how's that for mental stability.....?)

Are you pretty solid on using the original engine that came with the chassis?

Because i'm thinking the firewall may not have to be cut/modified as much as i originally may have thought.
 

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So, i was thinking something like these:

and maybe:

Where it's low-slung and the flares are not super huge.
 

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I have two '72 Vega's....and my stepfather has two Corvettes, a '64 and a '69.

There is no way the Vette chassis would fit a Vega without complete firewall and floorpan removal, firewall setback of nearly a foot if not more, and driver seat setback accordingly.

A SBC transplant into a stock firewall Vega barely clears, headers are multiple piece deals with several separate tubes that slip fit together at the collector. The front suspension are very narrow compared to the Corvette as well.

Front suspension on the Vega is not up to V8 use except for lightweight Drag race, otherwise it needs a complete make-over to handle the weight and power, front disc brakes are a single flat blade about 1/2" thick and 9" in diameter......if you want a handling deal, you will need to swap some other suspension in there, there are no good pieces for the stock set-up.
 

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Monza rotors, vented after '76, fit...I had a '74 Vega with a 215 aluminum Olds motor with G-body front brakes and spindles, adapted with a little a-arm fab work, which along with the G-body aluminum rear drums hugely upped the braking power as well as improving the camber curve. Rear suspension needs nothing to be good for handling, except both ends need stiff swaybars and shocks. That car and other Vegas I had including with a built-four handled very well, it was a good suspension design for its' time. However even with the very light engine, after a couple years the front structure was coming apart. A bunch of sheet metal stampings spot-welded together, which bent, cracked, and peeled apart...the guy with the car in the above link is going to find all that out. With that unfortunate weakness, stock Vega suspension IMO is actually better than the stock mid-year Vette suspension which has an IRS originally designed for 6" wide bias tires, so there goes much of the sensibility in that swap besides the substantial packaging issues. I used to run my cars up in the So. Cal. canyons pretty hard, always down on power a little compared to most cars, just barely behind the Porches on cornering but ahead of any larger car. Corvette guys would never race so who-knows.

None of this was with small-block cars where the headers hung so low you had to creep over standard driveways. I built one of those too, with a friend, tubbed and all that before everybody was doing it, was good for straight-lines and looking crazy but not much else.

When Vegas were a dime-a-dozen and lined up in the scrap yards untouched was the time to be trying all this stuff, I wouldn't do it now unless I happened to have a couple around already. My last Vega, after half-a-dozen built ones, was a dead-stock "Millionth-edition" '73 that I wish I'd kept.
 
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