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My 51 chevy deluxe has the original 235 splasher in it. it runs but it misses on exceleration. people have told me to ditch it for a full pressure but its been imposible to find one in my area and when I find one it across the country and it super expensive to ship..
I got a quote from a local rebuilder to rebuild the splasher for 1350.00
Is it worth it?
I live in the city and at the moment dont have a garage to do any major rebuilding.. other than the motor the cars in great shape and I just want a
semi-reliable classic..
sorry if the questions are stupid..thanks for the help..
 

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"May the Schwartz be with you"
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If you want to keep it original then by all means have it rebuilt. If you don't care then swap it out for newer technology. It is a decision only you can make. I personally would keep it all original.
 

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If thats your only problem (no oil smoke or rod knocks, ect) I'd go the tune up route. Do a compression check first and it will show up bad valves, rings and head gaskets. If all is OK, then change the: points, condenser, plugs, plug wires, cap and rotor. This fixes most problems. Does it miss only when hot? could be the coil. An auto electric shop can check it out. Hows the carb? theres not much to the old carbs and kits are fairly cheep. The 235s were good motors and took a fair amount of abuse without complaining. It's good to see an origonal old Chevy out there running daily and my vote would be to try to fix it first. Whatever your choice, hang around this place as it's one of the best sites around and there is enough knowledge within this site to fix or build just about anything. :thumbup:
 

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My recommendation is if you want to keep the 235, and are not doing a number-matched restoration, swap it out for a later model from '54 through '62. Virtually the same engine except it is fully oiled and well supported with after-market parts. In fact, this swap was common back in the 50s on these trucks and cars. Very common to find a late model 235 already in an early car like I found in my '53 pickup. Although it obviously can be made to work, the early engine just isn't up to modern highway speeds and abuse! This swap also opens up the possibility of switching to a GMC engine that came in 228-248-270-302 sizes. Toyota bought the molds and patterns from GM for the 235 and put the engine with virtually no changes in the Land Cruiser I think well up into the 80s!
 

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Once upon a time I had a 1953 Chevy with the 235 babbit six and had lots of fun dragging it on the street. But I seemed to have had a miss on hard acceleration and I went throught he plug,points etc thingie. Finally I just gave up and drove it. One day I was on a trip and met a mechanic who after I was telling him about my "miss" he opened the hood, took out a six inch piece of wire terminated it on the distributor lid clip and then to ground. Never missed on acceleration again.

But I did go to the later pressure six and never regreted it. They are easy to find and make great stoplite cowboy fun. They can sound beautiful with split manifold and multi carbs look great. As a matter of fact I still got a '57 six sitting in the yard its complete bellhousing to water pump...I switched it out for a V8 but it is a high mileage unit that needs everything. you can easily get a rebuild block with pressure system for a lot less than 1300+ and you will not regret it. Oh you gotta change out the oil gage if you go pressure.

P.S. I think the older sixes were 216 cu inches not 235..and some of the power gulides had full pressure systems while standard cars still used the splash system. Look around they should be plentiful and fun to rebuild..easy good learner for biginners.
 

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[email][email protected][/email] said:
My recommendation is if you want to keep the 235, and are not doing a number-matched restoration, swap it out for a later model from '54 through '62. Virtually the same engine except it is fully oiled and well supported with after-market parts. In fact, this swap was common back in the 50s on these trucks and cars. Very common to find a late model 235 already in an early car like I found in my '53 pickup. Although it obviously can be made to work, the early engine just isn't up to modern highway speeds and abuse! This swap also opens up the possibility of switching to a GMC engine that came in 228-248-270-302 sizes. Toyota bought the molds and patterns from GM for the 235 and put the engine with virtually no changes in the Land Cruiser I think well up into the 80s!
Thats solving tke problem,,..

That is the way ,,..
 
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