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after ihave painted,how long should i wait to color sand?what grit?and what compound to buff with?are the foam pads the ones to use for buffing? i also have a lambswool pad,my buffer is a twospeed makita.thanks for your inputs!jimm
 

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Using info givin' to me by a friend(in the custom painting biz) who does flawless work, your wait I'm sure, depends upon the paint you use. Sanding, use 320 to even out any runs or irregulaties, sand complete body with 1500 and then step up to 6000(it's called jewelers cloth) and sand again. I'm not sure about what pads he uses. I notice that his paint jobs have incredible depth and not a wave in site.
 

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heeeeeeyyyy joooooee,whatare you doing with that gun in your hand? sorry, couldnt resist[jimi hendrix?]iffen ya dont mind asking idont mind waiting.since you have a friend with experience , pick his brain forhis technique.,thanks for responding,jimm
 

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I did mine after 2 weeks,but I have heard you should wait longer, however the sanding may be harder. I used 1200 grit with a soft pad using plenty of water and a drop of soap.sand until any sign of orange peel is gone. I used 3m micro compound, wash the car with soap and water, then a machine glaze,and finally wax. I used a variable speed polisher at about 1000 rpm. Results were good. Stay away from any edges and don't sand or polish thru the clear.My paint was clear/base.
 

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One other thing Jimm, apply the compond to the paint, use the buffer pad to spread the compond. Polish until compond is gone then add more and polish again. use lambs wool pad (a clean one for glaze) Be cautious until you get the feel, maybe practice on your wife's car. Have fun!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
hot57,howdy!thanks for joining in!what youve said sounds good!you know how you are after spending all that time getting it ready!so, every bit of info helps, thanks again!jimm
 

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Jimm, you can visit my pals web site, <a href="http://www.phantompaint.com," target="_blank">www.phantompaint.com,</a> his name is Ken Wheeler. Now, I'll move over and let jimmy take over.
 

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opinions will differ, but this is what works for me: if you use PPG products, base/clear or single stage urethane, and if you let the paint air dry, 24 hrs should be long enough. If you wait much longer, it will be much harder to sand and buff the paint. I tape all edges and high peaks with masking tape, wet sand area with 1000 grit, then 1500, then 2000 (a little soap in the water helps also) until all the orange peel and surface debris is gone. This can be detected by wiping the sanded ared dry to see if any "shiney spots" still appear on the surface, if so, keep sanding. Let the sandpaper do the work, you are not rough sanding at this stage, dont get too exited and work it too hard..if you break thru the clear coat or on a single stage job, thru the paint to primer, you have just screwed up...When you have everything sanded to suit you, wash everything with soap and water. Once everything is clean, I use a CP pnuematic buffer with foam pads(different color pads for different degrees of buffing, heavy, medium, light, etc.) The pads are color coded and state on them what cut they are for. I use a buffing compound called "Production", it's pink kinda like Pepto-Bismal...do an area no larger than about 3'X 3' at one time. Keep buffing that same area until it shines like you want it. After you have done the entire car to your satisfaction, then you can use swirl mark remover (PPG, MEGUIRES, etc) to bring the shine to top shelf appearence. This is a long, drawn out, hard work process, but the end results will be worth it. If you dont have a high dollar paint booth, this is about your only salvation, as much work after the paint as before the paint. But it will make a distinct difference in the appearence of your paint job when you are complete. Hope this helps...PACO
 

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Discussion Starter #9
paco!howdy,should i use a sanding block during the wet sand/color sanding?thanks paco,jooooe,hot57 "preciate it"jimm

[ March 19, 2002: Message edited by: jimm ]

[ March 19, 2002: Message edited by: jimm ]</p>
 

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Absolutely use a sanding block. You can get them in various lengths, but the type made of a hard rubber compound with a slot in each end with the "tacks" to hold the paper works best for me.(4-5" long block,the type that you can squeeze and feel it give, not the hard plastic type.) If you cut your paper the right way,(across the short way) you can get about 4 pieces out of it just right for these blocks.(they usually sell 1000grit and lighter in half sheets, so you'll only get half as many pieces). If you have tight spots or slightly curved spots to deal with, take a paint stirring stick, cut it off about 3-4 inches long (about the same width as your sanding block)wrap the sand paper around it and use it for a block. NEVER wet sand with your fingers and paper only, unless it is just not practical to get to it with a block. You can't achieve a smooth, flat surface with your fingers and paper, it may appear you will, but it don't work that way. USE A BLOCK...With the light grit paper, you are not going to cut too much, but don't get radical and stay in one spot too long, it is sand paper, and it will eventually cut thru if you stay too long in one spot. Once again, the block will help you over come this. Tape your edges and high spots with masking tape so you dont sand over them, you can always lightly sand those areas after the remainder is done to your satisfaction. An edge or peak in a fender will sand off before you realize it, the tape helps prevent that from happening. Do the same thing when buffing, it also works there too. Speaking of buffing, let the buffer do the work, don't bear down on it and dont concentrate in one small area, you'll either burn thru or heat the paint and pile it up like waves. Use the buffer at a slight angle so the front half of the pad contacts the surface, not the entire pad. You are not waxing, you are buffing. I use a Chicago Pnuematic CP685 air polisher rated at 2500 rpm with different foam pads made by SCHLEGEL. The black pad=heavy cut, yellow=medium cut, green=light cut/polish, blue=soft polish, white=final finish. This subject is one of those things that any number of people could tell you how to do, and they would all answer you differently...and they may all work just as well. My way isn't perfect, it IS time consuming and a lot of work, but, it works for me, and if you do it like I have said, it'll work for you. Just don't expect it to happen in a couple of hours...or even a couple of days if you are new to it. Take you time, be careful, and you can make you paint look like a million bucks for just a few dollars worth of investment and a lot of elbow grease....
 

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Discussion Starter #11
paco,you the man!clear instructions,now i just have to put them to use.i do plan on putting the time into it,thats why all the questions!muchas gracias,jimm p.s. will try to send photo when done[that'll be a while]
 

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Hi!

I've been told, "don't sand where you can't buff".
Well, what about the ridges, small curves, crevices, etc. that need to be finished?
Are there effective techniques by hand that make sense?

Thanks!
Dwain
 

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I would stay away from the hard rubber blocks, get a soft rubber one (dense foam) 3m or napa has them. they will follow the contours and give a good even sand job. Like posted use a foam pad, a clean one for each different compound. After the swirl mark remover use a good sealer-glaze, I use Maguires speed glaze. But there are others out there. Use your finger tips or the end of the soft block, you might have to hand rub some of those hard to get places. I use 1500 first then 2000 grit, to finish. Use a soft rubber squeegee to dry where you are sanding to check the surface for smoothness. I get mine at napa, or the paint store.

Troy

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