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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We all know what the connecting rod is however, I've never run a bushed rod. Looking for advise on the pros and cons. Other than the fact that you can hang the pistons without the help / cost of a machine shop. The engine I'm building is a CHEVY 355. It won't ever turn 7,000 rpm, and will see mostly street use. The rod in question to be specific is the Eagle S.I.R. 5700bblw. Has anyone used this rod? How does it perform long term? Any and all comments will be appreciated.
 

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Race it, Don't rice it!
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Use whichever you can get cheaper.

You still need a machine shop to check the big and small ends. I've seen several that were not right. Close, but not right. If you buy then from the machine shop, you will be paying the upcharge but it's cheaper than buying elsewhere and have them check it anyway. Especially when one is off size and you get stuck paying shipping to get another.
 

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Mekanicus Automotive Group
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Press fit or Bushed eh?

Most all of my engines are for racing, only a few are for street, but all have eagle h-beam press-fit rods. Bushed rods are fine for the street, and even for some racing applications. It can be merely a matter of opinion. But, I've had bushed rods send pistons through the oilpan after five races. I've also had a set of press fit rods last just fine for the past eight seasons. From my own experience, bushed rods are fine for anything that doesn't rev beyond 6000 very often.

Speedshift.
 

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I would try and stay away from the eagle I-beam rods. I've heard that the big end wont stay round after you torque it. A few members here have said that as well as my machinist. I got rid of mine and bought a set of Scat rods.
 

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Speedshift_Sam said:
Most all of my engines are for racing, only a few are for street, but all have eagle h-beam press-fit rods. Bushed rods are fine for the street, and even for some racing applications. It can be merely a matter of opinion. But, I've had bushed rods send pistons through the oilpan after five races. I've also had a set of press fit rods last just fine for the past eight seasons. From my own experience, bushed rods are fine for anything that doesn't rev beyond 6000 very often.

Speedshift.
Boy we build a lot of performance engines for the street and strip with bushed Scat rods and we also build alo of circle track engines in the Northeast with bushed rods and have not sent a piston through the pan but on thse engines we are using some Crower high end stuff.


Just comparing apples to apples here are you a machine shop owner and do your own work or are you depending on someone else to do your work, I ask brcause if you sending pistons down though the oil pan something is not being fit right or the right parts are not being used.
 

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Mekanicus Automotive Group
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Bushed rods

That was my own dumb fault. A life lesson learnt the hard way. Bought a cheap set of Oliver rods at a swap meet to get my spare engine ready for the season opener. I put them on my arbor and they checked strait, so in they went, without even bothering to sonic test of magnaflux them. Rod six had a hairline crack just below the wrist pin boss. Nine laps in, and Karma caught up with me. Destroyed a perfectly good Moroso roadrace pan and chewed the cylinder up badly enough that it had to be sleeved. Never saw another race lap in it's life.

Speedshift.
 

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Stay away from the Eagle Sir I-beam rods. The big end doesn't hold it's shape. Scat I-beams are better if you want an I-beam rod.

A pressed-pin rod is fine for the street. I usually hone the pin bore (in the piston) for a little extra clearance.

Bushed rods work fine for the street as well. Make sure the bushing oiling hole(s) is(are) clear of burrs and are lined up with the hole(s) in the rod and the hole(s) in the rod itself has a good chamfer(s).

tom

(s)
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Gents, Thanks, Thanks, Thanks!!!!!!

Gentlemen, Many THANKS for the insight. I'm grateful to have had your input before I made the wrong choice. I've decided to go with the Scat 9000 series cast crank & I-beam (pressed rods). Only looking to get 375- 400 hp out of the engine, as this 86 scottsdale stpsd project is very important to my son & I. Combo is as follows. The 305 has been put on the shelf. I acquired a 95 350, will torque plate bore it 30 over, speed pro f/t two valve pistons, plasma moly rings, vortec 906 heads (jegs), perf prod crosswind intake from south_sales/ ebay (similar to edelbrock rpm air gap), holly 750 quick adj vac sec w/ 68 primary jets. billet msd hei coil in cap, hooker comp headers also from jegs. Also jegs self align, centerbolt v/c aluminum roller rockers. Still working on a cam choice, I've run the comp cams magnum 305,& 280 dur cams in the past. I 'm leaning towards the 270dur / 470 lift. Not quite as choppy as the 305 & 280 but should still give some rumble in the jungle & be ok down low to mid. Block is roller ready/ but we're going to stay with hydraulic flat lifter to keep cost down. All thats left is machine shop prep, ordering crank, rods, flywheel & balance. Again, You are gentlemen & scholars!!! Todd
 

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Race it, Don't rice it!
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machine shop tom said:
Stay away from the Eagle Sir I-beam rods. The big end doesn't hold it's shape. Scat I-beams are better if you want an I-beam rod.

A pressed-pin rod is fine for the street. I usually hone the pin bore (in the piston) for a little extra clearance.

Bushed rods work fine for the street as well. Make sure the bushing oiling hole(s) is(are) clear of burrs and are lined up with the hole(s) in the rod and the hole(s) in the rod itself has a good chamfer(s).

tom

(s)

You find that is true with the capscrewed rods too?

I haven't seen those problems myself.
 
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