Hot Rod Forum banner
1 - 20 of 32 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
All,

Every time I dig deeper on this car I find new surprises.

Here is the latest problem area I have found. This is the rear section between the trunk and convertible top base mounting area. I have looked at this from all angles and am trying to determine the best course of action aside from finding a donor. Braces are all solid it is just the sheet metal both top and bottom pieces. Car is a 68 Cutlass... Looking for any suggestions....

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,980 Posts
hmmmm,its a lotta work,even for a pro better get rid of it....I might be presuaded to take it off your hands....just kiddin find a company that makes the patch panels for them like year one if your lucky it may be available or interchangeable with chevelle or something.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
468 Posts
Like DMB says, lotta work even for a pro. After market parts will probably not exist for that area of the car. Only interchange I can think of would be the Buick Skylark as it shared the same body style.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Not going to give up on this one...
I've got too much time already invested to give up now. I checked out the site you posted and looks like he's got a really good collection. I started to cut out the badly rusted areas to get a feel for what I'm in store for. Its going to take a bit of work, but I've got a plan and I feel I can repair this section. I've got access to a brake and shrinker/stretcher so I should be able to make the pieces close enough to at least replace the rusted out sections. This project was never meant to be a 100% factory restoration anyway.

What is the best way to remove the lead filler from the factory? I'm going to need to weld in new pieces right where the factory seam was leaded and I assume i need to ...get the Led out

Couple pics of where I am at now...




 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,980 Posts
I use a small propane torch and a stiff painters five point putty knife.to remove lead "never a grinder or sander" (lead poisening)..I got to hand it to ya though ,you got the right attitude...My best advice is for you to make your patches before you cut the old metal out...use drill screws to secure them cut one layer at a time, then use the drillscrew holes to refasten the patch in the same exact spot you started in...the patches should be removed & replaced as many times as it takes....start at the outer layer making patches and work your way in ...the drill screws are the key,I really like the HF air screwdriver "15.00". take your time build it in your head an make your plan dont weld until you've completly rebuilt everything ,you'll need a "flanger /punch " from HF 40-50.00 also lowes has some good drils with a flatter angle than most common drills ,I use them for drilling out the welds they'll drill one layer at a time,but use a 1/8" drill first it makes the bigger drills last ten times longer,keep us posted... you'll have a lot more questions and there are other ways that may be easier for a beginer but I think you can handle it,that break and streacher will be a big help too...good luck....(last chance)to sell it to me ......Mike O.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
468 Posts
Using a torch as DBM suggested make sure your wearing a respirator. Lead does exhibit fumes when melted. Also, treat it, as you would seam sealer. If it doesn’t need fixing leave it alone.

Additionally, those patches when installing only tack weld until your ready to completely weld them in place. That way it’ll be easier to remove to make adjustments as you go.

We forgetting anything DBM?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for the advice guys :thumbup:

Made some more progress today and thought I would share...

I still need to trim and flange the pieces to get a better overall fit. This was just a couple hours of roughing it out. It's starting to look usable.



 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Getting closer on this, however I am trying to come up with a way to form the edge on the top patch that supports the pinch weld molding. I was thinking a bead roller could do it, but I was hoping I wouldn't need to spend the dough on a tool I would use only once.

Any Suggestions?

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I worked a couple hours on the patch this afternoon and came up with this piece. It's not quite perfect, but the flange will get covered with the chrome molding so I think it will work alright once I clean it all up.

I hit the edge with my panel flanger and then beat the edge around the dolly to get it close.


 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,980 Posts
cjperotti said:
Yeah Tx, that's doing it. Donor car? We don't need no stinking donor car!

Dang, DBM. This guy's not going to need our advice.
hahaha CJ, we better keep close tabs on this guy...we may need some advice ourselves.Some are simply naturals,its great to stumble over them aint it? Your doimg great tx...keep us posted. PS those HF magnets sure are handy ,eh..I've never saw anyone else use them,it shows your thinking :thumbup: also I've seen pros do lesser quality work.If you ever need a job........
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks for the kind words....

Unfortunately I spend more time looking and thinking about this than actually working on it. At least all that time appears to be paying off. Once this section is done, it is on to the other side. Fortunately that one is not nearly as bad as far as I can tell. I guess I wont know the extent until I start cutting.

Just about every section of this car needs some work, so expect many more questions. I believe this piece is the worst of it. That's why I hit it first. Once I am done here it is on to the doors and new quarters.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
159 Posts
Nice metal work tx. You are like me, coming up with solutions on the fly.

I have made some more complex shapes than you are dealing with by making a buck out of plywood. I screwed and glued the plywood pieces together, clamped the buck and sheet metal to the bench, and stretched the metal into the buck with a dull chisel and hammer. I made a large cowl repair piece with this method; between making the buck and forming the patch panel it took me several weeks, but the repair is seamless and I'm glad I spent the time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,980 Posts
Fast Eddie D said:
Nice metal work tx. You are like me, coming up with solutions on the fly.

I have made some more complex shapes than you are dealing with by making a buck out of plywood. I screwed and glued the plywood pieces together, clamped the buck and sheet metal to the bench, and stretched the metal into the buck with a dull chisel and hammer. I made a large cowl repair piece with this method; between making the buck and forming the patch panel it took me several weeks, but the repair is seamless and I'm glad I spent the time.
thats a real good way to form one piece wheel wells too, poplar or mahogany are great woods for form making having a wood shop sure is handy and another great hobby
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
So I am debating on what to do for the section where the factory quarter and rear panel mated. It has the flange there where the factory welded and leaded the panels together. I was thinking I could cut out the old and weld in a patch to make everything line up better. Or since I will need to reapply the body solder anyway should I just weld it as is and worry about cleaning it up later with filler. It is about 1/4" gap at the lowest spot.

pic attached
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,980 Posts
tx,thats totaly up to you.being your first attempt (hard to believe)I wouldnt worry to much about it but if I was you I'd just fill the seam by welding in a small piece of metal instead of filler and eliminate the seam altogether...its looking good :thumbup:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
734 Posts
tx_68olds said:
So I am debating on what to do for the section where the factory quarter and rear panel mated. It has the flange there where the factory welded and leaded the panels together. I was thinking I could cut out the old and weld in a patch to make everything line up better. Or since I will need to reapply the body solder anyway should I just weld it as is and worry about cleaning it up later with filler. It is about 1/4" gap at the lowest spot.

pic attached

Nice job on the repairs - Keep up the good work!

Why not re-lead it? Lead work is not all too difficult to learn, and Eastwood tools have nominally priced kits that come with all the tools you need.

Here's a link for some inspriration on the one and only Hudson Jet convertible prototype that was recently brought back from the point of no return!

Hudson Jet Convertible Prototype
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
468 Posts
Leading is not as easy as it sounds. You first have to blue the metal you’re going to lead then melt the lead into it. Your working on a sixties car with metal too thin to hold up to the heat temperature required to applying lead. Normally lead would work on cars built from 59 on down as they used heavier gauge metal. I've been there.

You can try it. However, I think you would get frustrated with it.

Personally, I would weld the patch in as you suggested.

Yes, your doing great. As DBM says, we may be asking you for advice soon.
 
1 - 20 of 32 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top