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Whats the best way to remove 50 year old undercoating? This stuff is everywhere. I want to strip everything down and slap on some Por15. Mainly working on under carrige, inner fenders and trunk.

Are there cheaper alturnatives to Por15 that work just as well?

Hoping a little work now will help keep my 54 Chevy around for a long time to come.

Thanks
 

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Lost in the 60's
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I helped a friend remove undercoating from a 1954 Ford Crown Vic the other day we used safety glasses, a hammer and an old wood chisel it was a rough ,tough, long dirty job ,but we got it. Sometimes there is just no substitute for elbow grease. :D
 

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Got this info from the Mercedes Benz Veterans club, Henry. "Depending on which kind of undercoat you have, a heat gun to soften it along
with plenty of elbow grease. Kerosene, gasoline and other solvents work to wash it off. Try putting some of the stuff you scraped off in various solvents and see which works best. Sand blasting unless it's coarse and shot at 100psi+ is slow" Good luck
 

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I use these three things for removing undercoating:
1. Cold scraping with a putty knife, screwdriver
ect.
2. Hot scraping with propane torch or heat gun
(watch you do not catch anything on fire).
3. Solvent such as gasoline or laquer thinner and
a rag or corse steel wool (no smoking heat
sparks or flames use solvent gloves and work
in awell ventilated area)

I recomend working over a heavy plastic sheat to simplify cleanup. Hot or liquified undercoating can realy screw up a nice concrete floor.
 

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Lost in the 60's
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Just looking through the Eastwood catalog, the have a undercoating removal kit. It appears to be just something to soften it up and some scrapers to scrape it off and then a cleaner to finish clean up. Still a lot of elbow grease, there is just no way of getting around that.
 

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Use a heat gun. Do not use a propane torch. You will soon have a fire and then warpage of metal. Don't use a torch.
 

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I was thinking that maybe spray on truck bed liner might work instead of using Por15, let me know what you think. David
 

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The spray on truck bed liner does make a good undercoating. There are 2 basic types. There is the cold process stuff that can be bought at wall mart or your local autoparts store. It is basicly a paint. It is tougher than paint but offers litle protection against stones and such. The other type is the hot process that is applied by truck accesory places. This offers much better protection against stones, heat, moisture, and it is an excelent sound dedener. It aint cheap and you had better be able to stand your car up on the fire wall or have it on a rotisary so it can be easily sprayed on. It hoewver is very tough and offers fantastic stone protection. You will need to at least have primer on the area you are going to apply either product to. I think Super Chevy Magazine did an article on it a couple of years ago. At this point I am planing to have it put on my car.
 

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About 3-4 years ago me and a friend coated the whole underside and frame with that Rhino bedliner, it wasn't fun, it wasn't cheep, but its as tuff as it says. We tride to pull a tree stump out of the ground and the chain snapped, 'bout took off my head (although eating dirt wasn't fun either) it bounced off the underside of the bed making an awful sound, but later upon investigation we couldn't find where it hit. After a few years it still looks like I just sprayed it, great for ease of cleanup too.
 

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I have seen a air powered hammer that has on the end a bunch of small diameter wires. looked like just the thing for the job at hand, but I haven't had a chance to try one. It's in some of the tool catalogs.
 

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What you are refering to is a needle gun. It's mainly used for scaling welds. It will losen up the undercoating but at the expense of leaving pock marks in the metal. It works great on rusty frames but for removing the undercoating, the heat gun and scraper are about the easiest way to go.

Racenuts
 
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