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... & Insanity Ensues .....
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933 Posts
home brew said:
:thumbup: :thumbup: :thumbup: How much is distilled water a gallon?
Prez Bush is soon to set the price for distilled water at $7/ gallon , lol
 

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You got a leaky spark tube...
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I have seen that before. Steam can be very powerful. The Navy is still using steam to power some of the most advanced warships in the world. It's very cool but there's only one problem. Using water means that you're going to have to carry a water tank around with you and that's going to add additional weight to a vehicle. I wonder what the overall outcome would be using a larger version in a small car. It would be interesting to see.
 

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41' Chevy Master DeLuxe Tudor
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123 Posts
The Crower article says,
Besides providing power, this water injection cycle cools the engine from within, making an engine's heavy radiator, coolant, and fans obsolete. Despite its lack of a conventional liquid cooling system, his bench engine is only warm to the touch while it is running.

Blazin72,
Possibly their would be somewhat of a trade off, your radiator and coolant would be replaced by a water storage tank. Most likely the tank would be larger than a radiator and like you say probably give some additional weight.
 

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neat idea, especially for anyplace that has warm climates year round, not very practical for a vehicle that would be driven in sub zero temps though.
I wonder how the cylinder temps would compare to a conventional 4 stroke, I'm thinking that they might be considerably cooler with this design which could possibly allow you to run higher compression without risk of detonation.
 

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You got a leaky spark tube...
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2,854 Posts

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41' Chevy Master DeLuxe Tudor
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123 Posts
It's great that guys like Crower have the passion, time and money it takes to pursue such a feat. I remember some years ago the late Smokey Yunick modified a 4 cyl. Dodge Omni which he said achieved 60 mpg with ample amounts of horsepower. There was no doubt about the horsepower, they showed him smoking the tires all away across the parking lot in that thing. It was pretty cool. :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
There are some very interesting conversations about the physics involved with this engine and the pros and cons,,in the blog at the end of the story,, some well educated people there,, interesting how smart people think,,, duhhhhh,, :mwink: :mwink: Bill
 

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T-Bucket, Corvette, Mustang
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507 Posts
I have some experience with early Stanley Steamer engines. I can tell you that steam is indeed a powerful method of propulsion. In these early cars, you carried two and sometimes three types of fuel, basically pilot light fuel and burner fuel, and sometimes a different fuel to preheat the pilot tube. Then you needed a tank to hold the water. Starting them is a long and somewhat fickle process and it looks like the 6-stroke would eliminate those hassles. But there is no denying the power - there is no transmission in these old vehicles. The one speed is plenty adequate and some of these accelerate like gang busters to boot.

I would think if the 6-stroke is optimized, then the added water tank might be offset somewhat by a smaller gasoline tank. This assumes that the gasoline mileage would increase and therefore a smaller tank for the gasoline is workable. The typical Stanley gets anywhere from 1 to 2 miles per gallon of water in my experience. Todays cars are much lighter than the old Stanleys, so with some advanced engineering and optimization I would think that much better 'water' mileage is within reach. The question in my mind is the engine oil and it's compatibility with water and water products which will eventually show up in the oil. The old Stanleys use 600 weight steam cylinder oil and it gets contaminated with water eventually (some have found ways to drain the water off without draining the oil but most just change it when needed). We buy the stuff in 5-gallon buckets. The other question in my mind is with the engine running so cool, does that diminish somewhat the efficiency of gasoline in any way - perhaps higher compression ratios are one of the keys.

In any event, how many cylinders in such an engine would you think it would take to make this thing run smoothly? Seeing that there are power strokes on the 3rd and 5th stroke (as I understand it), a single cylinder engine would not run very smoothly unless it was running at a high RPM or with a heavy flywheel. However a 3-cylinder engine sounds workable (comparable to today's 4 cyl engine?) and a 6-cylinder might be the equivalent of something we might put in our hot rods. Just thinking out loud here and letting the imagination run a little.
 
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