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Discussion Starter #1
Don't know if it has ever happened to anyone else, but I had the damndest problem trying to weld today. I had one of the "arrowhead" magnets to hold a bracket while welding. It wouldn't fit with the bracket stuck to the edge of the magnet, so I turned it 90* and stuck the bracket to the flat edge. I tried to strike an arc, and all I got was sputter. I messed with the amperage, tried different rods, and everything. I thought maybe my rods had gotten damp from staying in the garage, so I took them in and cooked them all in the oven for about 45 min. Still wouldn't weld! I wondered if it was the metal I was trying to weld on, so I put a scrap piece next to it and welded fine. I finally took the magnet off and everything worked fine! Evidently the magnet was influencing the arc, and keeping it from burning correctly. Never had that trouble using the magnet on it's edge.
Sorry to ramble, but hope it will keep somebody else from having such a lousy day in the shop!!!

:pain: :spank: :pain:
MF
 

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It'll go, or it'll blow...
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152 Posts
This has happened to me a number of times while Mig welding. I thought that the anlge magnet is attracting the mig wire/ molten metal and somehow directing it away from the molten puddle. I think it might be interrupting the electrical contact.

Nova John
 

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Tow Chainer
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245 Posts
I've had it happen while mig welding also. I use "super magnets" Neo somethin.. They are in hard drives. If I run over where one's on the back the weld goes bad. I think part may be from them holding grindage and metal to the surface of the sheet metal around them. It was only close to the magnets though.
 

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Yep, magnets will really screw up arc welding of all kinds. Keep them as far way from the weld site as possible. Use the magnets to tack the parts together then remove them when running the beads.
 

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Just a firefighter
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324 Posts
Thanks for the tip Willy's but why do they effect the arc?? Is it or could it be the polarity of the magnet that causes it?? Us beginners what to know.

David
 

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Stop and think what an arc is composed of; negatively charged electrons and magnetic liquid metal! Both meat and potatoes for a reasonably strong magnetic field.
 

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A few years back while working in Flight Test at Boeing field in Seattle, our fab shop was tig welding some stainless air ducts for one of our test planes. Less than 1/4 mile away an AWACS 707 was also being worked on and they cranked it up and turned on the electronics package to do some tests. All of our welders started complaining at once of how their arcs were going nuts and they couldn't weld!! Someone in the group was smart enough to realize it was the AWACS broadcasting that was the problem and life went on..:thumbup:
 
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