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EFI Rules and Carbs Drool
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My buddy has an old willys jeep that has a V-6 in it. He's conviced it's from a 64 Buick because that what some of the parts cross reference from. It doesn't look like a V-6 I'm familiar with, but that doesn't mean much. We're there V-6 back then?
 

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If I remember correctly Buick had a V6 in the 60`s, it was sold to jeep, then bought back by Buick it grew into the 3.8 V6 were all familiar with now. GMC also had the massive 305 V6 in the 60`s.
 

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DoubleVision said:
If I remember correctly Buick had a V6 in the 60`s, it was sold to jeep, then bought back by Buick it grew into the 3.8 V6 were all familiar with now. GMC also had the massive 305 V6 in the 60`s.
thats the one im talkin about, GMC made it
 

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Yes the early Buick V-6, which is entirely different than the GMC truck engine, was the first U.S. attempt at slicing 2 cylinders off of a V-8. They were odd-fire,as it is referred to now, and would shake the guts loose in the distributor. The newer 3.8 Buick V-6s are derivatives of this same engine. Without it there may never have been a Buick GN Turbo engine.
 

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just a gearhead in paradise..
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yep it was a aluminum v8....
215

See also Rover V8 engine

GM experimented with aluminum engines starting in the early 1950s, and work on a production unit commenced in 1956. Originally intended for 180 in³ (2.9 L) displacement, Buick was designated by GM as the engine design leader, and decided to begin with a larger, 215 in³ (3.5 L) size, which was deemed ideal for the new "senior compact cars" introduced for the 1961 model year. This group of cars was commonly called the BOP group or A-bodies.

The 215 had a 4.24 in (107.7 mm) bore spacing, a bore of 3.5 in (88.9 mm), and a stroke of 2.8 in (71.1 mm), for an actual displacement of 3533 cc. The engine was the lightest mass-production V8 in the world, with a dry weight of only 318 lb (144 kg). It was standard equipment in the 1961 Buick Special.

Oldsmobile and Pontiac also used the all-aluminum 215 on its mid-sized cars, the Oldsmobile F-85 and Pontiac Tempest. However the Oldsmobile version of this engine, although sharing the same basic architecture, had cylinder heads designed by Oldsmobile engineers, and was produced on a separate assembly line. Among the differences between the Oldsmobile and Buick versions, it was somewhat heavier, at 350 lb (159 kg). The design differences were in the cylinder heads: Buick used a 4-bolt pattern around each cylinder where Oldsmobile went to a 5-bolt pattern. The 5th bolt was added to the intake manifold side of the head, one extra bolt for each cylinder. This was supposed to alleviate the head-warping problems that came about on the higher compression ratio versions.

At introduction, Buick's 215 was rated 150 hp (112 kW) at 4400 rpm. This was raised soon after introduction to 155 hp (116 kW) at 4600 rpm. 220 ft·lbf (298 N·m) of torque was produced at 2400 rpm with a Rochester 2GC two-barrel carburetor and 8.8:1 compression ratio. A mid-year introduction was the Buick Special Skylark version, which had 10.25:1 compression and a four-barrel carburetor, raising output to 185 hp (138 kW) at 4800 rpm and 230 ft·lbf (312 N·m) at 2800 rpm.

For 1962, the four-barrel engine increased compression ratio to 11.0:1, raising it to 190 hp (142 kW) at 4800 rpm and 235 ft·lbf (319 N·m) at 3000 rpm. The two-barrel engine was unchanged. For 1963 the four-barrel was bumped to an even 200 hp (149 kW) at 5000 rpm and 240 ft·lbf (325 N·m) at 3200 rpm, a respectable 0.93 hp/in³ (56.6 hp/liter).

Unfortunately, the great expense of the aluminum engine led to its cancellation after the 1963 model year. The engine had an abnormally high scrap ratio due to hidden block-casting porosity problems, which caused serious oil leaks. Another problem was clogged radiators from antifreeze mixtures incompatible with aluminum. It was said that one of the major problems was because they had to make extensive use of air gaging to check for casting leaks during the manufacturing process, and not being able to detect leaks on blocks that were as much as 95% complete. This raised the cost of complete engines to more than that of a comparable all cast-iron engine. Casting sealing technology was not advanced enough at that time to prevent the high scrap rates.

Although dropped by GM in 1963, in January 1965 the tooling for the aluminum engine was sold to Britain's Rover Group to become the Rover V8 engine, which would remain in use for more than 35 years. GM tried to buy it back later on, but Rover declined, instead offering to sell engines back to GM. GM refused this offer.

Surplus engine blocks of the Oldsmobile (5 bolt) version of this unit formed the basis of the Formula One Repco V8 used by Brabham to win the 1966 Formula One championship.
 
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