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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello Fellow Hot Rodders!

I am really good at working on cars, but not so great when it comes to interiors. I have some great seats that I pulled out of a junk yard, but clearly the fabric has to be 100% replaced. I was thinking about using the existing frame and adding new padding and just stretching vinyl across it. Has anyone done this before? If so do I go to Joann Fabrics for padding and vinyl or are there better places out there? I found some cheap vinyl at Marine Vinyl Fabric .com so I think I might just get it there, but do people have any "do or don'ts" before I get started?

Thanks!
 

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Basically you carefully take the old seat covers apart with a seam ripper which is a tool to used to cut the thread allowing the cover to come apart. Then using the pieces of the old cover make patterns for the new seat covers, sew them up and put the new covers on. Depending on the condition of the existing foam you may not need to make repairs or if you do just cut out the area to be repaired and fill that in with new foam..

Clear as mud huh!!

Sam
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Sam! I might have to ask my grandma for some sewing leassons, but the rest seems straight forward. The foam seems easy enough.

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cheap materials.

usually cheap material doesn.t last. I upholstered My T bucket about 50 years ago, My brother-in-law had a friend in the upholstery business and He said I could get the materal at a good price. When I got the bill, I said this is about 3 X as much as what I had been looking at in a fabric store. The interor In the T is still in pretty good shape. I did a swap with a guy that did upholstery in his garage and the vinyl was junk in 3 years.
 

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Timothale is right, you can do it cheap or you can do it correctly with high quality materials and have it last. The web site you're looking at can't possibly be selling true marine grade vinyl for about $8.50 a yard, unless it's old or seconds. The specs they quote, including the vinyl being "30 gauge", don't mean anything. Vinyl is graded by it's weight per running yard or by square yard, not its "gauge". 30 ounces per running yard (54" by 36") it would be less durable than vinyl graded by the square yard, (36" by 36"). Real marine vinyl is oil and gas resistant, UV resistant for 650 hours, stain resistant, mildew resistant, cold crack resistant down to 10 below zero, and passes abrasion tests of up to 200,000 double rubs on the Wyzanbeek test.
 
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