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1969 Mustang Coupe Project Car
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1,270 Posts
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I'm installing my new Champion radiator, the entire radiator sits on rubber and is isolated from the chassis. Other than the trans cooler lines I don't think there is anywhere that it has a ground on it. Should I make a short ground wire to tie the radiator to the chassis to help prevent electrolysis? Thanks for the help
Jag Daddy aka Mark
 

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the 'Duracell Project'
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2,645 Posts
sorry guys, can't say i've ever grounded a heater core or radiator or replaced a either one due to electrolysis in the 50 years i've been driving old beatup trucks. radiator/heater core failure is 90% from running water, northern guys have to run antifreeze. i lived in the south for 16 years, lots of frozen blocks from that day it wasn't supposed to freeze but did.

i did google "grounding a heater core". "a Ford bulletin on basically the same subject was blunt, “Do Not Ground Heater Core. If the heater core is grounded, you have provided the electrolysis a path through the heater core. This would cause the heater core to become an anode or receiver, and it would promote the electrolysis, or any stray voltage, to use the coolant as the ground path.” Repeat heater core failures and electrolysis
 

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Old racer buddy told me to use zinc anodes. Been using one ever since. They have them as attached to the radiator cap or replaces the radiator drain plug.

This is the one on summit ive purchased and used without any issues

 

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Hates: Liver. Loves: Diesel
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6,313 Posts
Your radiator is probably already grounded better than anything in the entire car. Every square inch of the water jacket is directly connected to the thousands of square feet inside the radiator. The surface area inside an aluminum radiator is pretty insane. Adding a ground to the radiator would do as much good as adding a grain of sand to a beach.
 

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Hates: Liver. Loves: Diesel
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6,313 Posts
Old racer buddy told me to use zinc anodes. Been using one ever since. They have them as attached to the radiator cap or replaces the radiator drain plug.

This is the one on summit ive purchased and used without any issues

Agreed. Sacrificial anodes work like a sponge for corrosive activity. It's not the flow of electrons that you are trying to avoid, it's the corrosive activity they create. Think of it like throwing a steak over there to occupy the guard dog so you don't get teeth marks in your buttocks.
 
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