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1969 Mustang Coupe Project Car
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I was looking around the net and found this stuff to weld aluminum called "durafix". It's supposed to weld alumininum with just a propane or map gas torch. Anyone tried it yet?

http://durafix.com

Thanks
Mark
 

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durafix question

I have never heard of this particular product, but I have used alumaloid and another product spelled a little differently and they have worded just fine. Just like they say, just heat with a torch. Very easy to use, starts working when it reaches the consistency of peanut butter.After cooling, it seems harder than the aluminum itself. I bought them both at a car show, (Carlisle Corvette show), but have seen similar product at local automotive store. Probably all the same product. Hope I was some help.

Dennis
 

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I've never used that brand but most good hardware stores will have some sort of aluminum brazing/soldering rod. I've used them from several sources and 95% they really do a good job. I wouldn't try to fix an aluminum head or highly stressed critical part but for things like patching an aluminum boat hull or irrigation pipe they're great.
 

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Funny you should ask. Yesterday, I came across an infomercial about stuff called Alumaloy. It was the same process.

I went on the 'net and found Alumaloy, Alumiweld, Durafix and some other products. All had the same or similar claims. I also read some of the testimonials and rebuttals. They were mostly positive.

Apparently this is a brazing process rather than a welding process. I'm not familiar enough to comment. You might want to go on the 'net and read them.
 

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1969 Mustang Coupe Project Car
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Discussion Starter #5
Well I'm going to do an artical about Durafix and fabrication. I'm going to be using it in place of welding my aluminum parts. I talked to the Durafix rep yesterday and they were very helpful. I'll keep you posted on the project, you should start seeing some photos soon. I'm no welder, that was my dad's forte' I never had the opertunity to learn from him. Plus I'm on a limited budget and cannot afford the tig welder etc. So durafix seems like a logical solution.

Regards
Mark:thumbup:
 

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I have never had any luck with those low temp aluminum brazing alloys, didn't work on pot metal either.

The stuff has virtually no strength and can't be used for structural/high temp applications. What possible use is it? Maybe for an ashtray or something?

Reminds me of the aluminum arc welding rods you can buy, strike an arc and watch the puddle collapse the surrounding material.:rolleyes:

Give me TIG or give me death.
 

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Didn't Patrick Henry say that?

In the infomercial Alumaloy showed reconstruction of a gearbox ear and a boat propeller, and some other things. It is supposed to have a strength of 39,000 psi...whatever that means. I think Alumiweld claimed 47,000 psi.

I'd like to hear the results.
 

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I'd have to wonder how they measure those numbers. Standard structural steel has a 36,000 # tinsel strength. Maybe they are just squeezing the stuff 'till it breaks.
I bought a little kit at the hardware store that has a roll of wire and some flux. It did work fine to repair a damaged aluminum radiator core. For thick sections, I use some flux coated aluminum arc rod with a DC welder. It leaves a real aluminum deposit behind.
 

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Tensile strength is usually measured by taking a test bar and pulling on it in a machine until it breaks. The thing they are not telling you is how thick of a test bar was it. I have done this at work many times for aerospace. You can pull a 1/4" test bar and a 1/2" test bar and vary the tensil results greatly. These ratings are usually done under perfect conditions with perfect alloy. How thick is your weld and how perfect (no impuritites and so on). A typical grade 8 bolt is rated to 96000 lbs, but I would not trust my life by hanging that much weight ona 1/4" bolt of any kind.
As a measure of safety, engineers usually specify a 10 to 1 ratio for safety reasons. I have never , ever found a chemical adhesion such as braze to be comparable in streght as a weld that uses paretn meta

Tensile strength is usually measured by taking a test bar and pulling on it in a machine until it breaks. The thing they are not telling you is how thick of a test bar was it. I have done this at work many times for aerospace. You can pull a 1/4" test bar and a 1/2" test bar and vary the tensile results greatly. These ratings are usually done under perfect conditions with perfect alloy. How thick is your weld and how perfect (no impurity and so on). A typical grade 8 bolt is rated to 96000 lbs, but I would not trust my life by hanging that much weight on a 1/4" bolt of any kind.
As a measure of safety, engineers usually specify a 10 to 1 ratio for safety reasons. I have never , ever found a chemical adhesion such as braze to be comparable in strength as a weld that uses parent metal and mechanical dispersion to join metals. In other words, MIG it, TIG it or Gas weld with penetration, no chemical flow type brazing for ultimate strength. For cosmetics, yup, works great.
 
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