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Gone fishin'
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666 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
This is on my dad's boat, that we use for fishing charters.
It has 2 454's pushing it around the water. It has some plain jane stock mechanical fuel pumps on the engines, and they have been giving us heck ever since we got the boat.
All the universal pumps seem to be for high peformance, these engines are only putting out around 330hp each so I don't need big pumps.
Are their any good pumps that don't cost to much for something like this?

Its also not a good idea to mount the pumps lower than the tank on this thing, since it would put the pumps in the bilge. Which is not a good idea for electrical stuff, So would they be alright mounted maybe a foot directly above the outlet tubes on the tank?

And what kind of fuel filter would ya'll recommend between the tank and pump? These tanks are known for condensation in the air bad, and the fuel filters on the boats are mounted on the engine and look like oil filters. I was thinking a small inline fuel filter would work fine to go between the pump and tank, but Im not for sure on that.


Brad
 

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599 Posts
Can you spell BOOM. Not a good idea. If you find some USCG approved pumps, they will have an approved mounting sheet with them. I have never seen such a thing. Marine pumps have a leak detector built into the pump and have very high quality innards. Expensive? yes but well worth it as they are normally trouble free. If you are running parts store pumps you are asking for trouble.
 

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Known traffic menace
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81 Posts
Yeah Brad, You don't want the CG to catch you using unapproved equipment, I'm shure being a charter service, You have to have inspections Trust me they don't like it and it is very dangerous to use unapproved stuff. 61Bone gave you very good advice. Perry.
 

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2,354 Posts
I would not put an electric fuel pump any where near the engine compartment of a boat. I don't understand why Delco fuel pumps would not work just fine as a replacement. Yes, they will rust out in a couple of years in the saltwater, but replacement is not that bad. Since EFI is showing up in the marine industry, there should be several options available to you. Just make sure they are low pressure, high volume types and not the high pressure for EFI (TBI uses much lower pressure) and they are in tank units that will automatically shut off when the tank is empty.

Trees
 

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Gone fishin'
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666 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Thanks guys. I forgot about the CG approved stuff.
We actually have yet to have a runin with the coast guard. It happens less than what you think. And as far as I know, the coast gaurd check other things more than that like enough life jackets, VHF radio, flares and that sorta stuff. But better safe than sorry.


The EFI is out of the question right now. Its out of the budget for just one engine, and WAY out of the budget for two. So were sticking with the carbs for now.



Brad
 

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Technical Support Barry Grant
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1,500 Posts
Brad,

There are multiple issues in converting over to an electric pump system on your Boat:

-First everything you do must be USCG approved. If not, and there is a problem your insurance company Will not Cover you!!![/U]
-Second most electric fuel pumps are designed to push fuel, not suck fuel so mounting it up high is not going to be very efficient.
-There are thousands of boats out there with fuel pumps in the bilge, but you have to be even more careful about running your blower to exhaust any fumes
-You'll also have to wire in oil pressure safety switches (very easy) so that the fuel pumps will not run unless you have oil pressure.
-You need to see what is causing the problems with the mechanical pumps you're using, there are millions of boats out there running properly with block mounted pumps, so what ever is causing your problem with the mechanical pumps could cause issues with your electric pumps should you choose to change.
 
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