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I've got a ? about some assembly lube that i have and need to know if it's worth useing on the camshaft for break'in. What i've got is a small tube of red Torco engine lube that came with the KB piston's, Plus i've got a 2 oz. tube of Coastal anti-seize assembly lube i got a Autozone. I've also got the 5/8 fl. oz. Compcams Pro cam @ lifter lube, that came with the cam that i had purchased at Summitracing, it's in a little black sqweeze packet. The shop guy that did my block work told me that what he put's on the bearing's is STP, but im not sold on that idea myself even though he's been building engine's close to 30 yr's. I'm not sure if i should just dip the piston's in oil, or stick assembly lube on them, and some of the complaint's i here about
compcams red assembly lube make's me wonder what i should use for the cam break-in.:confused: (Please Advise)
 

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I quit using STP for assembly lube when I learned to read;) . I can't believe anyone today is still using STP, where has this guy been? The STP will make an engine extremely hard to turn over once it is assembled. Stick with the cam lube that came with your camshaft. The other lube should be the motor oil (and that's all) you are going to use in the engine. Prime the oil system with the proper tool before the initial startup.

Is the cam a flat tappet or roller? If it is a flat tappet the only additive I would use is a can of GM's EOS. If it is a roller, no other lube is needed, just motor oil.

Vince
 

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Wait a second, I think you guys missed the main question.

You do not need to use assembly lube on pistons, nor do you need to dip them in oil. Lightly lube the cylinder walls and then put the pistons in.

As for the cam, Yes use assembly lube on all the lobes and journals. The first 30 minutes on a cams life is the most dangerous. I don't understand "soaking" a cam in oil, they are made out of cast iron, or nillet and aren't going to "soak" up much if any oil. If you want to use oil on them then just pour it on and go you will get the same effect (IMO).


Royce
 

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Suggest you also read the instructions (Who needs instructions, right!) that come with your rings. Some (Total Seal for one) recommend installing them dry.
 

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break in lube

i have a small block 350 and when i put it together i put break in lube on the main bearings and rod bearings and then i put my cam lube on the cam and lifter bottoms, and then when i had the timing cover on i just took my oil and dumped it in the lifter valley so everything gets a nice lube up!! :thumbup:
 

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Simo said:
Whats the main function of the cam lube??
how is it better than eng oil ??
The contact area betweent the cam lobe and lifter is very small, creating high contact pressure. Cam lube is a high-pressure lube designed to protect the cam and lifters from damage upon initial start up. The best cam lube is a moly paste, available from Crane and others.

I don't use Total Seal rings, but I believe that a small amount of engine oil is needed on the rings and cylinder walls to prevent scuffing damage. Regardless of rings used, I would NEVER assemble an engine with dry rings.

There are may types of assembly lubes. I usually use 105 Lubriplate motor assembly grease. I have also used Goodson's teflon-based lube.

The type of lube used is not as important as is the need for the assembly to be done CLEANLY.

tom
 

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Tom,
When I was a kid I was taught to lube the pistons and ring before assembly. Most piston ring manufactures don't suggest lubing them now days. I know for sure Total Seal say not to lube them and only apply a small amount of oil to the cylinder walls. My last few engine have all had Total Seal rings. I have not seen any negative effects.

In either case you do not want to use assmbly lube on pistons and rings. I have used oil in the past with no ill effects.

Royce
 

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machine shop tom said:


There are may types of assembly lubes. I usually use 105 Lubriplate motor assembly grease. I have also used Goodson's teflon-based lube.
tom
I use Slick 50, with that stuff you don't even need to add oil :rolleyes:

Vince
 
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