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Discussion Starter #1
I'd like to assemble my engine but it's going to be a couple of months before I fire it. I'm concerned that the assembly lube could be gone by that time. I've read that a good 10-30 oil is an adequate assembly lube for a hydraulic roller engine except for using moly paste on the push rod and valve tips and the distributor gear. Is there something other than engine oil that can be used that will stay put for that long? I plan to pre-oil the engine with a drill before starting also.
 

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lucas assembly lub

is what i always use and have never had an issue. my engines don't sit for maybe a few wks before installing and firing up. and i lube everything very... very well.
 

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Race it, Don't rice it!
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I've never had a issue as long as its well primed before fire up on roller engines. Some of ours bounce around in the trailer cabinet for a long time before getting used.
 

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Redneck Professional
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Joe Gibbs Engine Assembly Lube - kind of a gel. I used it last Winter for the camshaft on my solid flat tappet cam change / bearing freshening and I liked it a lot. Little packet came with my Crower Camshaft, so I bought some more. I did use Permatex Ultra Slick on my bearings earlier in the repair process but I'm sure the Joe Gibbs would have been fine for that as well.

Why do you worry so much about a roller cam? Just be sure to use good break-in oil like Lucas and prime the oil pump well before firing with a proper tool. Then change the oil after a few hours running and inspect filter. You will be fine!
 

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I have used STP on all the modified engines I have assembled. Sometimes I did not install the engine in the car for several months. A light coating of STP on moving parts will remain indefinitely after assembly and will dissolve in oil after the engine is started and warmed up. We used STP on bearings for break in with satisfactory results on our Junior Fuel Dragster engine annual rebuilds from 1967 through 1972.
 

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True Hotrodder
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There are a number of assembly lubes out there, the main issue is where to use them. And unless it's a roller cam setup, the camshaft and lifters MUST have specific Moly assembly lube on those surfaces - taking the time to rub the first coat in and then recoating the surfaces is a good thing to do. The other assembly lubes can be used for bearing surfaces, oil pump, piston pins, rocker arm pivots, pushrod ends and timing chain components. I do prefer to heat up some oil to about 200 degrees and soak the timing components in it for 20 minutes, then let it cool to the touch. On piston rings and skirts, I prefer a 50/50 mix of 50 weight and STP. As mentioned, it sticks pretty good for a long time and once warm mixes well with the oil. Make sure you pull the filter and oil after your initial start up as the moly for the cam will plug up the filter quickly.
 
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If I can find it I use GM EOS, or STP on crank and cam bearings. Isky Rev Lube lovingly rubbed in on flat tappet cams and tappet feet with EOS or STP in tappet sides and their block bores. Roller cams get a brew of EOS of STP with a hint of Rev Lube.



Cylinder walls, pistons skirts, rings and pins get regular detergent engine oil.


Gears that make rubbing contact like cam to distributor or gear cam drives get Isky Rev Lube on the teeth. Chain cam drives get a couple day soak in engine oil.


Bronze valve guides get plugged on one end and get to soak a few days in engine oil, stems get EOS, STP, transmission assembly jell, or Red Line Assembly Jell. Cast iron guides and stems get one of the heavy oil or assembly jell treatment.


Push rod ends get Rev Lube as do ball and socket rocker fulcrums. Roller rocker fulcrums get engine oil with a hint of Rev Lube.


Bogie
 

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Isky lube for flat tappets cams is the only stuff worth using, use it on lifters, cam, valve tips, pushrods, anywhere you have metal on metal sliding friction.
Everything else gets regular engine oil with Redline break in additive. If you prime it before the first start, that's all it takes
 

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the 'Duracell Project'
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I have used STP on all the modified engines I have assembled. Sometimes I did not install the engine in the car for several months. A light coating of STP on moving parts will remain indefinitely after assembly and will dissolve in oil after the engine is started and warmed up. We used STP on bearings for break in with satisfactory results on our Junior Fuel Dragster engine annual rebuilds from 1967 through 1972.
same here. stp
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Appreciate everyone's feedback. I think I'm good on this but one final question: My son has a 454 that he rebuilt with fresh pistons, rings and bearings. It's a mild build with no crazy spring pressures. He re-used the cam and hydraulic flat tappets he had. The engine has been completely assembled and sitting for a year and a half. Should the cam lobes and lifters get a fresh coat of the proper lubricant or would you trust it to a good pre-oiling?
 

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You should use new lifters on an old camshaft. Otherwise, you must put to old lifters back on the same cam lobes ther were originally on, and hope the cam will survive. Coat the lifter face and cam lobes with STP and prime the engine with a drill fixture through the distributor hole. Those drill pre-oiling fixtures are available from Summit, or any large engine equipment supplier.

The best option is to use a new camshaft and new lifters or a roller camshaft.

I watched a camshaft go flat after the engine was started with mixed up lifters. The rocker arms slowly quit moving within five minutes after the engine was started.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
The cam and lifters in my son's engine were almost new so he reused them. Since it's a cam that's already broken in I'm thinking he may be ok with giving the engine a good priming.
 

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The cam and lifters in my son's engine were almost new so he reused them. Since it's a cam that's already broken in I'm thinking he may be ok with giving the engine a good priming.
Tis is true as long as the cam/lifters were originally out of the same engine and each lifter was put back on the same cam lobe. Anything else, then a failure is likely. Almost new doesn't mean anything to a camshaft - any measurable wear is unacceptable.
 
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