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Painting an engine

Tony,
First three rules of painting are PREP, PREP, PREP. The surfaces must be chemically clean for the paint to stick, and stay. Assuming you do not have access to industrial equipment, a simple lawn pump sprayer can be used to spray cleaning solvent on a dirty block. Regular parts cleaning brushes and lots of elbow grease to get all the nooks and crannys. Assemble or tear down, depending on whether this is a new build or a used engine as far as possible, leaving off everything you do not want to paint engine color (FEAD, non-metal parts, carb, wires, etc.). To keep paint out of threaded holes, use slave bolts or make little cones of masking tape and shove the point of the cone in the bolt hole. Do not expect your spark plugs to perform well if you paint them. Mask off any surface that will seat a gasket or seal. This includes surfaces on the crank and pulley flanges. Your local auto paint store can suggest the best paint for your application and area. I have used everything from Rustoleum with a brush to sprayed on clear epoxy. Most often, I used spray cans of enamel from the local auto parts store.
 

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Automotive grade epoxy primer followed by an automotive grade 2K singlstage urethane paint will provide the best look and lengevity-period.

If possible have the block and heads degreased and shotblasted then epoxy the exterior surfaces before any machining gets done, then it's a simple degrease, scuff, apply another coat of epoxy then your paint.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
paint engine

Mike in Michigan said:
Tony,
First three rules of painting are PREP, PREP, PREP. The surfaces must be chemically clean for the paint to stick, and stay. Assuming you do not have access to industrial equipment, a simple lawn pump sprayer can be used to spray cleaning solvent on a dirty block. Regular parts cleaning brushes and lots of elbow grease to get all the nooks and crannys. Assemble or tear down, depending on whether this is a new build or a used engine as far as possible, leaving off everything you do not want to paint engine color (FEAD, non-metal parts, carb, wires, etc.). To keep paint out of threaded holes, use slave bolts or make little cones of masking tape and shove the point of the cone in the bolt hole. Do not expect your spark plugs to perform well if you paint them. Mask off any surface that will seat a gasket or seal. This includes surfaces on the crank and pulley flanges. Your local auto paint store can suggest the best paint for your application and area. I have used everything from Rustoleum with a brush to sprayed on clear epoxy. Most often, I used spray cans of enamel from the local auto parts store.
Hi Mike,thank's alot for your info,it's nice to know that there are some helpful people around,you never know i imght come up with a little gem you can use,thank's agian Mike see ya.Tony Parsons
 
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