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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just wanted to reach out to the guys using Evans and see what their results have been. I have a 34 Ford w 502 crate motor so its typical big motor small radiator situation.
I converted to Evans while I had the heads off, First I used the prep before removing the heads. So I ended up with an almost pure reading over 56 on the refractometer.
The motor seems to be running about 25 degrees hotter, and if I let it , the temps has gotten as high as 240. It does recover and seems to be running around 220 when Im moving down the road. The temp has always climbed when moving slow or stopped and when I put my foot into it , so it seems to be doing the same as before only 25-30 degrees higher. When I shut off the motor at 240 it seems to be fine and shuts down with out any run on, no bad smells or noises. So my question is how many guys are driving around at these high temperatures without any problems and how hot is too hot?
 

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regular antifreeze at 50/50 mix with a 15lb cap is good to 265°
evans is good to 375°, while i'd hate to see 375° under my hood
you're still within antifreeze temps, not sure what you're worried about
for your application, evans is a waste of money
 

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Are you sure you don't have air trapped in the heads. LS engines have vents to let trapped air purge. Many other engines can trap air too but no one really wants to talk about it.......everyone assumes its the radiator.

The heads on an engine are the primary source of heat, and the block usually is not problematic. I would see if adding a couple fittings and a temporary purge doesn't alleviate the problem. There are lots of people running large engines...some with superchargers and they cool just fine.....so it has to be doable.

Some radiators are modified to be multi-pass which helps. Then you also might back the timing off a degree or two and see what the result is. I would not accept temps that high. I plan to put a 500 Cad in a 32. There are lots of people who have temp problems on the Cads. One of the solutions they came up with is to drill a couple additional coolant holes in the deck of the block at the rear. This allows more flow at the back which subsequently flows forward. Not sure if air is being trapped or just insufficient coolant, but it works. The idea was to NOT drill the coolant holes in the mid cylinders, which may allow the coolant to return before it gets to the back.......but to make it easier to flow at the back and then return past the mid cylinders. I just say that as an example to demonstrate that the heads are usually where the problem originates and often finding your solution there will correct the problem. You might try pointing an infrared heat gun at your heads in different places to check for hotter areas, and also compare exhaust header temps.

Here is what they do to the 500 Cadillacs.
Hand tool Metalworking hand tool Font Auto part Metal

Automotive tire Motor vehicle Vehicle brake Bicycle part Auto part

Musical instrument String instrument String instrument accessory Font Guitar accessory


Its possible that just venting similar to an LS engine and running the line to the radiator tank may help. Some people run the vent to the top of the water pump, but that requires removing the pump to keep chips out of it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
regular antifreeze at 50/50 mix with a 15lb cap is good to 265°
evans is good to 375°, while i'd hate to see 375° under my hood
you're still within antifreeze temps, not sure what you're worried about
for your application, evans is a waste of money
I dont want to get in a situation where I start boiling over and have to replace head gaskets.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Are you sure you don't have air trapped in the heads. LS engines have vents to let trapped air purge. Many other engines can trap air too but no one really wants to talk about it.......everyone assumes its the radiator.

The heads on an engine are the primary source of heat, and the block usually is not problematic. I would see if adding a couple fittings and a temporary purge doesn't alleviate the problem. There are lots of people running large engines...some with superchargers and they cool just fine.....so it has to be doable.

Some radiators are modified to be multi-pass which helps. Then you also might back the timing off a degree or two and see what the result is. I would not accept temps that high. I plan to put a 500 Cad in a 32. There are lots of people who have temp problems on the Cads. One of the solutions they came up with is to drill a couple additional coolant holes in the deck of the block at the rear. This allows more flow at the back which subsequently flows forward. Not sure if air is being trapped or just insufficient coolant, but it works. The idea was to NOT drill the coolant holes in the mid cylinders, which may allow the coolant to return before it gets to the back.......but to make it easier to flow at the back and then return past the mid cylinders. I just say that as an example to demonstrate that the heads are usually where the problem originates and often finding your solution there will correct the problem. You might try pointing an infrared heat gun at your heads in different places to check for hotter areas, and also compare exhaust header temps.

Here is what they do to the 500 Cadillacs.
View attachment 619016
View attachment 619017
View attachment 619018

Its possible that just venting similar to an LS engine and running the line to the radiator tank may help. Some people run the vent to the top of the water pump, but that requires removing the pump to keep chips out of it.
I'd like to know how that turns out, you will be dealing with a small radiator also. Im pretty sure there is no air in the system. I filled it over a period of several days. I have a gutted thermostat also. Ive worked on a lot of European cars that have to be bled, they will overheat if they have air in the system. This car does not overheat and it recovers to cooler temps when moving down the road at normal speeds.
The people at Evans claim the cars will have higher temps, Im looking for input from other users.
 

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Hates: Liver. Loves: Diesel
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I ran Evans in a Caddy 500 for years towing heavy stuff - probably around 10,000 lbs. One particular day I left Phoenix towing that trailer headed for Flagstaff which is 150 miles of "up." Coolant hit what I'm guessing was 300 (280-degree gauge) and it never did a thing. Oil cooler kept the oil at around 220. Never heard a ping.

You have to shift your thinking. The actual temperature of the coolant is pretty irrelevant. The only reason we have to keep it cool is because once the water in traditional coolant boils, it's all over. Think of it this way: Every minute you have thousands of ignition events of 2700 degrees. It's not the temperature of the water that causes damage, its that when it boils it creates pockets of steam which can no longer absorb heat like liquid water can, and the combustion chambers get super-heated. If you remove the boiling fear, a piece of cast iron that melts at 2200 degrees doesn't care if the gauge reads 195 or 295. Imagine having a cast iron pan in a 500 degree oven. It will be totally fine. What happens when a vehicle overheats is more like using an acetylene torch on one focused spot in the pan. You will superheat one spot while the rest isn't, and you can get a cracked or warped pan

Heat does not equal temperature. As long as the coolant can transfer enough heat, the actual temperature isn't a big deal. The reason we want to keep temperatures low is because of the limitations of the boiling point of water-based coolants.

I eventually ditched the Evans. It was fine, but one of the things that you have to realize is that everything about an engine is designed to operate at (you guessed it) a temperature based on boiling point of a 50/50 coolant. The tolerances in the engine. piston-bore clearance, bearing spaces, ring gaps, oil temps and viscosity, etc are all tailored to hit their target "sizes" when the oil and coolant reach a stasis around 200 degrees. If take away the water from the coolant and let it get hotter, you risk superheating the oil, or at least giving yourself a need to control oil temps to prevent blowing past those tolerance thresholds. At the very least, I would install an oil temp gauge.
 

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There are obviously other things that become problematic at elevated temperatures and none of them are good. My "opinion" is that waterless coolant is a band aid fix for something that isn't working .
However, you know what they say about "opinions".

All engines have their own pecularities and identical engines don't always act the same way. Filling over the course of several days will have no effect if an engine has a natural tendency to trap air in pockets in the heads. Adding some fittings and "burping" the heads might help. Gutting the thermostat "might" be causing your problem. Depending on the design of your engines coolant system, the thermostat restricts the flow back to the radiator...........forcing coolant to take the path of least resistance "thru the engine". Its possible that if the thermostat is gutted that water can be taking a path of least resistance thru the radiator. It depends on passage size as well as location.


I eventually ditched the Evans. It was fine, but one of the things that you have to realize is that everything about an engine is designed to operate at (you guessed it) a temperature based on boiling point of a 50/50 coolant. The tolerances in the engine. piston-bore clearance, bearing spaces, ring gaps, oil temps and viscosity, etc are all tailored to hit their target "sizes" when the oil and coolant reach a stasis around 200 degrees. If take away the water from the coolant and let it get hotter, you risk superheating the oil, or at least giving yourself a need to control oil temps to prevent blowing past those tolerance thresholds. At the very least, I would install an oil temp gauge.

Curtis got this exactly right. Additionally the higher temps can induce detonation within the engine.


The people at Evans claim the cars will have higher temps, Im looking for input from other users.
Ok, I did my best to help, but if you believe that higher temps are acceptable and Evans is the answer, then I won't belabor the point any further.
 

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Curtis got this exactly right. Additionally the higher temps can induce detonation within the engine.
Thanks for the nod. I never got a single audible ping with mine in 100-degree ambient temps climbing a mountain towing 10k, foot to the floor, and the coolant temps were 300 degrees.

The main cause of detonation is when the coolant's ability to carry heat has been reduced; namely nucleate boiling. You can picture it like when you're heating a pan of water on the stove and there are little bubbles on the bottom that don't make it to the top. But as long as the delta of the heat transfer remains constant, it's not really the actual temperature that causes detonation. The temps of the chamber can be higher, but unless they're really high (like 1000 degrees) it's unlikely they will cause detonation. Having said that, there is always a chance that a particularly rough peak of the casting can get hotter than it's surroundings, but the bottom line is that as long as the coolant is transferring the HEAT it needs to, the temperature doesn't really matter.
 

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Your numbers look what is expected with waterless, at 240 your under the waterless boiling point of 375 by 135 degrees and that at just atmospheric pressure which would be a with zero pressure cap. Then figure with 50/50 and a 20 pound cap the boiling point is like 265 so if you were running 220 with 50/50 this is only a 45 degree cushion.

The point here is to suppress localized boiling around the traditional hot spots that have temperatures considerably higher than the bulk coolant temp the gauge is reading. These hot spots are exhaust seats and spark plug bosses. What you are using is the higher natural boiling point of waterless to keep these extreme hot spots wet and surrendering heat to the coolant. With 50/50 or straight water even with high system pressure your never that far from locally boiling the coolant from these hot spots. When that happens the local temps run away. This stresses the casting by the cooler surrounding material restricting the expansion of the overheated zone material, Once this force difference can no longer be tolerated the strain is released by cracking the casting. This is along with eliminating corrosinon in the cooling jackets is the whole point of waterless.

Given the greatly extended difference between operating temperature and boiling temperature of waterless the probability of boiling over as pure water or 50/50 mixes will do is almost eliminated. That is not to say it is safe to remove the cap, especially if it is any sort of pressure cap.

All materials expand when heated. Inside a cooling system you have this occurring which is pushing against the pressure cap. When this force is enough to lift the pressure cap the pressure is reduced but not the temperature. With pure water or 50/50 there isn’t much margin between the boiling point at system pressure and certainly this is considerably over the natural STP boiling point. With a pure water to perhaps even beyond a 50/50 mix if the temp is over 212 for water and about 223 for 50/50 at STP (Standard Temperature and Pressure as viewed for testing) If the temperature in these pressurized systems is above the STP boiling point and is relieved by releasing or removing the pressure cap the hot and expanded coolant will explode to steam instantly. At STP with waterless the boiling temp is about 365 which such that if a pressure cap is venting expanded fluid or you remove the pressure cap it will puke the expansion volume but it will not explode to vapor.

So the summation here is the high STP boiling point is much more likely to keep the very hot locations of the casting wet thus transferring heat in a uniform fashion compared to what happens with local boiling, thus all the surfaces maintain a more uniform temperature which in turn reduces the localized strains in the casting to less than the failure limit that results in cracking. This can be done with lower system pressure which is easier on radiator tubes, especially the larger 1 inch tubes of aluminum radiators, easier on hoses and clamps. With the addition that waterless does not promote the electro-chemical reactions that result in corrosion.

What you will see is operating temps about 20-25 degrees higher that with 50/50.

You should monitor oil temperature, but as a generality sump oil temps in a vehicle not working hard in a loaded truck, towing or racing getting the oil hot enough to drive the waters of blow by out is a bigger problem. I was pursuing my Harley manual the other day and saw that they recommend an oil temp of 220 degrees. I don’t even have an oil cooler on that air cooled motor and even climbing desert mountain passes on 100 plus days my oil tank temp gage has never registered above 188. So by extrapolation I’d be surprised if your oil temps are out of line. Plus I need to give consideration that while air cooled motorcycle engines run head temps around 350 that the bottom end is all roller and needle bearings which run pretty cool compared to the shell bearings of a auto engine, so there are a lot of different things going on here that justify you hooking up a temp gauge to the oil pan but I wouldnt expect any surprises. Generally oil temp is a bigger issue if you’re running an automatic that cools it’s oil in the engine’s radiator. Here you probably should seek an external oil cooler.

Bogie
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Your numbers look what is expected with waterless, at 240 your under the waterless boiling point of 375 by 135 degrees and that at just atmospheric pressure which would be a with zero pressure cap. Then figure with 50/50 and a 20 pound cap the boiling point is like 265 so if you were running 220 with 50/50 this is only a 45 degree cushion.

The point here is to suppress localized boiling around the traditional hot spots that have temperatures considerably higher than the bulk coolant temp the gauge is reading. These hot spots are exhaust seats and spark plug bosses. What you are using is the higher natural boiling point of waterless to keep these extreme hot spots wet and surrendering heat to the coolant. With 50/50 or straight water even with high system pressure your never that far from locally boiling the coolant from these hot spots. When that happens the local temps run away. This stresses the casting by the cooler surrounding material restricting the expansion of the overheated zone material, Once this force difference can no longer be tolerated the strain is released by cracking the casting. This is along with eliminating corrosinon in the cooling jackets is the whole point of waterless.

Given the greatly extended difference between operating temperature and boiling temperature of waterless the probability of boiling over as pure water or 50/50 mixes will do is almost eliminated. That is not to say it is safe to remove the cap, especially if it is any sort of pressure cap.

All materials expand when heated. Inside a cooling system you have this occurring which is pushing against the pressure cap. When this force is enough to lift the pressure cap the pressure is reduced but not the temperature. With pure water or 50/50 there isn’t much margin between the boiling point at system pressure and certainly this is considerably over the natural STP boiling point. With a pure water to perhaps even beyond a 50/50 mix if the temp is over 212 for water and about 223 for 50/50 at STP (Standard Temperature and Pressure as viewed for testing) If the temperature in these pressurized systems is above the STP boiling point and is relieved by releasing or removing the pressure cap the hot and expanded coolant will explode to steam instantly. At STP with waterless the boiling temp is about 365 which such that if a pressure cap is venting expanded fluid or you remove the pressure cap it will puke the expansion volume but it will not explode to vapor.

So the summation here is the high STP boiling point is much more likely to keep the very hot locations of the casting wet thus transferring heat in a uniform fashion compared to what happens with local boiling, thus all the surfaces maintain a more uniform temperature which in turn reduces the localized strains in the casting to less than the failure limit that results in cracking. This can be done with lower system pressure which is easier on radiator tubes, especially the larger 1 inch tubes of aluminum radiators, easier on hoses and clamps. With the addition that waterless does not promote the electro-chemical reactions that result in corrosion.

What you will see is operating temps about 20-25 degrees higher that with 50/50.

You should monitor oil temperature, but as a generality sump oil temps in a vehicle not working hard in a loaded truck, towing or racing getting the oil hot enough to drive the waters of blow by out is a bigger problem. I was pursuing my Harley manual the other day and saw that they recommend an oil temp of 220 degrees. I don’t even have an oil cooler on that air cooled motor and even climbing desert mountain passes on 100 plus days my oil tank temp gage has never registered above 188. So by extrapolation I’d be surprised if your oil temps are out of line. Plus I need to give consideration that while air cooled motorcycle engines run head temps around 350 that the bottom end is all roller and needle bearings which run pretty cool compared to the shell bearings of a auto engine, so there are a lot of different things going on here that justify you hooking up a temp gauge to the oil pan but I wouldnt expect any surprises. Generally oil temp is a bigger issue if you’re running an automatic that cools it’s oil in the engine’s radiator. Here you probably should seek an external oil cooler.

Bogie
The cooling system is working, I live in South Florida which is really the hottest part of the US, hot rods and HY-PO motors are always a battle with heat. The 34 Ford wasnt designed to have a 500CI motor in it. I have the biggest radiator that can fit in the space. (Copper core dimple) , the motor runs at the same temp with the thermostat in, with the thermostat gutted it just takes a little longer to heat up. In our winter months 70-80 degrees it will run all day at 175-180 and I can make it get hot by either sitting in traffic or running it up the rpms through the gears a few times. As soon as i go back to 45 -70 mph in 6 gear it will cool back down to the 175 -180 range. That tells me the cooling system is working. The car will also run at the same temp with the AC on. Summertime is another story, I try not to get stuck in traffic or sit at a light to long. So the main reason I tried the Evans was to keep me out of panic mode when the temp went into the 200 range. Evans said that the coolant would raise the temp, but I didnt expect to see such a high increase.

If Im reading your reply correctly this is normal for the Evans., and the motors not in danger. I will check into an oil gauge , not sure where I can mount it, but I'll find a spot. What should the oil temp range be? Thanks for your help!
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
There are obviously other things that become problematic at elevated temperatures and none of them are good. My "opinion" is that waterless coolant is a band aid fix for something that isn't working .
However, you know what they say about "opinions".

All engines have their own pecularities and identical engines don't always act the same way. Filling over the course of several days will have no effect if an engine has a natural tendency to trap air in pockets in the heads. Adding some fittings and "burping" the heads might help. Gutting the thermostat "might" be causing your problem. Depending on the design of your engines coolant system, the thermostat restricts the flow back to the radiator...........forcing coolant to take the path of least resistance "thru the engine". Its possible that if the thermostat is gutted that water can be taking a path of least resistance thru the radiator. It depends on passage size as well as location.





Curtis got this exactly right. Additionally the higher temps can induce detonation within the engine.




Ok, I did my best to help, but if you believe that higher temps are acceptable and Evans is the answer, then I won't belabor the point any further.
The cooling system is working, I didnt try to use the Evans for a repair. I live in South Florida which is really the hottest part of the US, hot rods and HY-PO motors are always a battle with heat, and The 34 Ford wasnt designed to have a 500CI motor in it. I have the biggest radiator that can fit in the space. (Copper core dimple) , the motor runs at the same temp with the thermostat in, or with the thermostat gutted it just takes a little longer to heat up when gutted. In our winter months 70-80 degrees it will run all day at 175-180 and I can make it get hot by either sitting in traffic or running it up the rpms through the gears a few times. As soon as I go back to 45 -70 mph in 6 gear depending if Im in town or on the highway it will cool back down to the 175 -180 range. That tells me the cooling system is working. The car will also run at the same temp with the AC on. Summertime is another story, I try not to get stuck in traffic or sit at a light to long. So the main reason I tried the Evans was to keep me out of panic mode when the temp went into the 200 range and over. Evans said that the coolant would raise the temp, but I didnt expect to see such a high increase.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
regular antifreeze at 50/50 mix with a 15lb cap is good to 265°
evans is good to 375°, while i'd hate to see 375° under my hood
you're still within antifreeze temps, not sure what you're worried about
for your application, evans is a waste of money
I never ran a car that hot on coolant , I didnt know that you could do that safely?
 

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Good points and why a water pressure guage is way better than water temp guage. I don't really care about the water temp, as long as the water stay in it. Now if the pressure dropped suddenly, you know you have a problem to worry about.
 

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No you cannot run a cast iron engine at 365. I think you not appreciating what some of us are saying that:

- 50/50 at atmospheric pressure is boiling at 223, with a 20 pound pressure cap that’s still only 265 so if your bulk temp is 240 with 50/50 there’s only 25 degrees to play with before your cooling system is all steam and alcohol vapor.

- With waterless you don’t get a phase change at atmospheric pressure till about 365 F, that means the internals are wet and at 240 you’ve got 125 degrees between being wet inside the jackets and absolute vaporous disaster where all the coolant pukes all over the place.

What your trading here is a generally higher operating temperature with a much wider margin between the coolant‘s boiling point and its operating temperature. The reason this is important as there are places inside the engine that are very much hotter than other places, specifically exhaust valve seats and sparkplug bosses. What we want to do is keep them wetted because liquid coolant carries a lot of heat away, when the coolant boils locally then not so much. These areas become super heated in this condition and form structural cracks in the casting.

As for your operating temperatures if the engine runs at the thermostat opening temp in the winter but is hot in the summer this is telling you there isn’t enough radiator surface area when the ambient temps go up. The rate of cooling per square inch of area is a function of the difference in temperature in this case the passing air and the coolant temp. The closer these two are in temperature the slower the rate of heat transfer, thus the increase in coolant temp.

The answer is for a given coolant flow is either more air flow which you see the effect of when you‘re moving or more surface area. Since your surface area is limited, we can fiddle the liquid in this case waterless glycol mix against 50/50 water and a glycol. Here again I point out for the critical situation this traded higher temperature tolerance to remain a liquid coolant compared to 50/50 for and at a marginally higher sustained operating temperature. This is an, if not, the essential point in the conversion of water or water mixes to waterless where your dimensions for a radiator or the inclusion of suitable fans and a shroud are limited by the space available or the needed appearance.

Some solutions I’ve applied in my desert rat days on vehicles such as yours included using the frame rails as a heat sink by solidly fastening lengths of pipe or tube to contact the frame structure. This increases both the available heat transfer area and the coolant volume. Here again if this is a show piece with mirrors to allow viewing of the underside at shows this may not be an option, but for the most part cars like that are trailered more than driven.

The downside of buying radiators is they are advertised on how much horsepower the engine can be. This pretty much is as useless a piece of information as selling mufflers by pipe size. In these cases there are critical details that are left to your imagination rather than situational facts. For a radiator fin and tube area count for a lot. These are the essence of how much heat can be transferred. For a given dimension more fins per inch is better as shedding heat to the atmosphere. The same goes for tubes the more the surface area to the tube volume the more heat is transferred to the fins. So unless you know how many BTU’s the engine is putting into the coolant (which varies with load and rpms) and how many BTU’s the radiator can shed per square inch of area which will vary with airflow across the core and coolant flow through the tubes. The latter having an unknown minimum and optimum rates. The purchaser has what the radiator can cool 600 horsepower? That raises the question of for how long at what environmental conditions which include altitude, humidity, temperature and density which varies with these plus air pressure as affected by high and low zones. All of this is running behind the statement that a particular radiator will cool 600 horsepower!

Other things you can do to help is find places for an engine oil cooler and if using an automatic trans an independent ATF cooler. Again you’ll have to look at the underside of the vehicle for mounting locations. These will also need fans as the old problem with stop and go is the lack of air movement through the fins.

This is not a simple problem, a place where you can see it move to the forefront is at the race track when cautions or stops are made after a few hot laps, these cooling systems are in real trouble when that happens. Left with a hot engine and little air or coolant flow this is a bad situation.

Turning back on my principle argument; the want is to insure the hot metal stays wetted in these critical zones. The 360 plus boiling point at just atmospheric pressure gives a fighting chance compared to 50/50 that even at 20psi above atmospheric is only good to about 240. So while I’m not advocating that you can run the engine with coolant at 360 something, I am looking to keep the hottest spots around the valves and spark plugs wet so their temperature doesn’t run away to destructive levels. This, however, is not a guarantee of that, it’s just crowding the odds in your favor.

Bogie
 

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Good points and why a water pressure guage is way better than water temp guage. I don't really care about the water temp, as long as the water stay in it. Now if the pressure dropped suddenly, you know you have a problem to worry about.
Sorry for hijacking a little bit.
Can you explain more about a water pressure gauge? I'm just thinking that if (50/50) coolant boils locally somewhere in the engine wouldn't it still be pressurized at the gauge? Not arguing, just curious.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
No you cannot run a cast iron engine at 365. I think you not appreciating what some of us are saying that:

- 50/50 at atmospheric pressure is boiling at 223, with a 20 pound pressure cap that’s still only 265 so if your bulk temp is 240 with 50/50 there’s only 25 degrees to play with before your cooling system is all steam and alcohol vapor.

- With waterless you don’t get a phase change at atmospheric pressure till about 365 F, that means the internals are wet and at 240 you’ve got 125 degrees between being wet inside the jackets and absolute vaporous disaster where all the coolant pukes all over the place.

What your trading here is a generally higher operating temperature with a much wider margin between the coolant‘s boiling point and its operating temperature. The reason this is important as there are places inside the engine that are very much hotter than other places, specifically exhaust valve seats and sparkplug bosses. What we want to do is keep them wetted because liquid coolant carries a lot of heat away, when the coolant boils locally then not so much. These areas become super heated in this condition and form structural cracks in the casting.

As for your operating temperatures if the engine runs at the thermostat opening temp in the winter but is hot in the summer this is telling you there isn’t enough radiator surface area when the ambient temps go up. The rate of cooling per square inch of area is a function of the difference in temperature in this case the passing air and the coolant temp. The closer these two are in temperature the slower the rate of heat transfer, thus the increase in coolant temp.

The answer is for a given coolant flow is either more air flow which you see the effect of when you‘re moving or more surface area. Since your surface area is limited, we can fiddle the liquid in this case waterless glycol mix against 50/50 water and a glycol. Here again I point out for the critical situation this traded higher temperature tolerance to remain a liquid coolant compared to 50/50 for and at a marginally higher sustained operating temperature. This is an, if not, the essential point in the conversion of water or water mixes to waterless where your dimensions for a radiator or the inclusion of suitable fans and a shroud are limited by the space available or the needed appearance.

Some solutions I’ve applied in my desert rat days on vehicles such as yours included using the frame rails as a heat sink by solidly fastening lengths of pipe or tube to contact the frame structure. This increases both the available heat transfer area and the coolant volume. Here again if this is a show piece with mirrors to allow viewing of the underside at shows this may not be an option, but for the most part cars like that are trailered more than driven.

The downside of buying radiators is they are advertised on how much horsepower the engine can be. This pretty much is as useless a piece of information as selling mufflers by pipe size. In these cases there are critical details that are left to your imagination rather than situational facts. For a radiator fin and tube area count for a lot. These are the essence of how much heat can be transferred. For a given dimension more fins per inch is better as shedding heat to the atmosphere. The same goes for tubes the more the surface area to the tube volume the more heat is transferred to the fins. So unless you know how many BTU’s the engine is putting into the coolant (which varies with load and rpms) and how many BTU’s the radiator can shed per square inch of area which will vary with airflow across the core and coolant flow through the tubes. The latter having an unknown minimum and optimum rates. The purchaser has what the radiator can cool 600 horsepower? That raises the question of for how long at what environmental conditions which include altitude, humidity, temperature and density which varies with these plus air pressure as affected by high and low zones. All of this is running behind the statement that a particular radiator will cool 600 horsepower!

Other things you can do to help is find places for an engine oil cooler and if using an automatic trans an independent ATF cooler. Again you’ll have to look at the underside of the vehicle for mounting locations. These will also need fans as the old problem with stop and go is the lack of air movement through the fins.

This is not a simple problem, a place where you can see it move to the forefront is at the race track when cautions or stops are made after a few hot laps, these cooling systems are in real trouble when that happens. Left with a hot engine and little air or coolant flow this is a bad situation.

Turning back on my principle argument; the want is to insure the hot metal stays wetted in these critical zones. The 360 plus boiling point at just atmospheric pressure gives a fighting chance compared to 50/50 that even at 20psi above atmospheric is only good to about 240. So while I’m not advocating that you can run the engine with coolant at 360 something, I am looking to keep the hottest spots around the valves and spark plugs wet so their temperature doesn’t run away to destructive levels. This, however, is not a guarantee of that, it’s just crowding the odds in your favor.

Bogie
The problem is the size of the Radiator , I had it built at RSH in Oregon supposedly very highly qualified. Big hassle as this had to cross the united states 3 times to be completed. It is their "Icebox" radiator and has the dimple core. But going back to 34 Ford grille there is only so much that can be done with that space. If it was my 69 Chevelle it s a different story. I looked around under the car and I have 4 inches by 18 inches between the crossmember and the oil pan for an oil cooler and thats it! The airflow would not be great in that spot, and I would have to angle it for clearance, not hopeful .
At this point the consensus from most of the members is against the Evans Coolant. I have driven this car for 2 years and have tweaked the cooling system as best I can . The Evans was basically a let me try it and see what happens. So I can go back to 50/50 coolant and occasionally hit 220 and throw on the heater to cool it off in an emergency. Or leave in the Evans and occasionally hit 240 not knowing if its safe. Either way I have not had a boil over or overheat situation. Something to think about
 

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I never ran a car that hot on coolant , I didnt know that you could do that safely?
You have to completely throw every bit of information on coolant/boiling out the window. The ONLY reason that temps around 200 are good and 250 is "bad" is because every car since the 40s has been using a mixture of water and antifreeze. The 200 degree mark is ONLY the number that makes people nervous because of the water.

Take away the water, and that number is no longer valid.

Cast iron melts at 2200. Combustion events are 2700 or higher. Cast iron doesn't care if the coolant is 200 or 300 degrees. The problem with overheating with watered-down coolant is that it's fallen over the threshold into boiling which means there isn't liquid coolant against the iron to wick away heat and temperatures skyrocket just at that point. That's what causes the damage in an overheated engine. It has nothing to do with the temperature. It's all about the heat.

Mine had a 2psi cap with the Evans. It really can be a 0 psi (vented) cap, but then it always smells like coolant. The 2psi cap just cuts down on how much smell escapes. But even at 300 degrees, it wasn't pushing anything out other than a little expansion.
 

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Hates: Liver. Loves: Diesel
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At this point the consensus from most of the members is against the Evans Coolant. I have driven this car for 2 years and have tweaked the cooling system as best I can .
Here's the thing. It's all about specific heat capacity. Water is a fantastic conductor of heat. Coolant (evans or regular green stuff) is not quite as good at conducting heat. So doing just a coolant swap to Evans won't make it run cooler, it will make it run hotter because it is both poorer at absorbing heat in the block and poorer at shedding it in the radiator.

I have nothing against Evans, it has its place. Evans in your case has the benefit of things being allowed to get a bit hotter without risking boiling/overheating, but it will also move less heat for you, causing higher temps.
 
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