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Discussion Starter #1
I’m making the trial fit for new 2 1/4” Flowtech dual exhaust and Magnaflow mufflers on my truck. The exhaust pipes fit together tight and I can tighten the clamps partway to hold the pipes in place while I fit the rest of the system. But the muffler flange is quite a bit looser fit and it’s hard get it to hold on the pipes. Even tightened down enough to just stop it from rotating, it is not a tight fit for the full circle.

The muffler clamps that came with the exhaust are light duty, and I think if I crank them down really tight to get a seal, something might strip or break. I can look for heavy duty clamps at the store, but want to know if there is anything else that would help it seal. I don’t have a welder, and don’t have anyone nearby to borrow one. Is there any type of heat-resistant sealing material I could put on the pipe before I slip it into the muffler flange to help it seal when I clamp it?

Thanks,

Bruce
 

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Old(s) Fart
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I've gone pretty much exclusively to band clamps for my exhaust systems. You can get straight ones for butt joints of pipes or stepped ones for slip fit joints like your pipe in the muffler. I also use Walker Acousti/seal for any leaks. This stuff is magic on metal-to-metal joints.



 

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I use v band clamps.
I highly recommend them.
A V band clamp is constructed of 3 pieces. 2 pieces that are welded to the tubing when pressed together forming a V. Then a outer clamp then squeezes the 2 pieces together.

They come in stainless and mild steel(usually zinc coated).
Here is a link to give you a picture.

These are what almost everyone uses for turbo applications.
These things are self aligning and make great exhaust clamps. You just weld the clamp to the exhaust pipe once and your done.

The things can be unclamped and easily removed then bolted back up making maintance easy. No gaskets, no goop, no leaks.

The only thing that I recommend is coating the threads with some
Locktight LB 8036

This stuff keeps exhaust bolts from breaking.

The great thing about a v band is if the bolt does bind you just cut it off and install a new clamp. The v part that is welded to your exhaust does not need to be touched.


I found a video after a quick search.
 

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I think the OP said in his post that welding was not an option ..OP , if you're referring to standard slip joints , I've never had a problem with leakage or slipping with conventional u- clamps , use only 3/8" clamps , place the saddle within 1/4" of the end of the outer tube & tighten the clamp to sufficiently crush/ crimp the joint , never leaks , never comes apart.. ( unless you use a torch )
 

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The muffler to pipe can be sealed using exhaust repair tape. This stuff cures rock hard and will make a seal.

Run the thing if possible or use a torch moving around the area then follow the video below. On how to apply the tape. The heat gun trick works. Allow proper curing times.



Now your commiting to the exhaust pipe and muffler being one piece by doing this. But generally the flange to muffler piece can be replaced along with the next muffler.
 

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Best stuff EVER right here


I have used the walker stuff, but it is NASTY.The wraps burn off for a few days and STANK.
This stuff is like block sealer, wet it, install, forget it.
I think it is like furnace cement
 

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Rod...from a Chrysler?
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Sounds like the OP got the new improved China specials made out of 5/16 rod.
Tighten the suckers until they clamp the pipes together. Use a cheater bar if you have to. If they break, go get the 3/8 thick ones. They will squeeze the pipes together for sure.

You don't need tape or any kind of paste.

PS, be careful with the 5/16 clamps. The cheap nuts don't engage the socket much. I ended up going to the hospital when the socket came off and whacked myself in the eye with the ratchet handle.
 

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Like button no workie Joe.'

So I LIKE your post here.....(y)
I never realized thats how the tinman... LOL
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks for all the input. Been out of town to TX to deal with problems from freezing weather, so I’m slow in reading your posts.

I’ll have to order band clamps and give them a try. The clamps that come with the Flo-tech exhaust will work in some cases, but they aren’t made that strong. I don’t really want to use any sealer if I can avoid it, since some of these pipes will need to come off when I work on the transmission or transfer case. I also bought an H-pipe, so that will definitely need to come off when I need to fix something.

Thanks again,

Bruce
 

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My first auto shop job , my boss was this absolutely fastidious Norwegian , Excellent teacher , he spoke with a bit of a Norwegian accent ( Ehh) & sometimes , especially if he was a bit worked up , things could be pretty funny . Anyhow , in reference to sealer , etc. He'd say , " You keep 'da goop off 'da,parts , ' deres no guood goop , eh ? , really miss Howard some times
 

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I have ran couplers in the past. You just slide the coupler over the outside diameter of the pipe until the stop hits then slide the coupler over your muffler tip.

Now usually these couplers fit tight enough I dont even need clamps. I still install them. But when welding a system with these couplers one tack is enough to prevent leaks.

Here is the coupler I am talking about.


Before you buy couplers. Measure the outside of both pipes to ensure they are the same size.

When building a exhaust system think about serviceability. A joint at the back of the headers then a joint at the rear of the muffler or cat. (Whatever is right before the axle hoop) is all you need. The center section can be dropped easily. You may need to drop the crossmember then prop up the transmission . But a X or H can still be dropped with only 2 joints(per side if dual).

You actually do not need clamps with couplers. You mount your hangers on a slight angle so whats behind the coupler is pushing forward and the coupler can not "slip" out.

Now a coupler is a tight fit. But a bit of heat(and wet rag on the pipe) expands the coupler enough where the rearmost section can be removed from the center section easier.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
To make maintenance easier I will have to be able to work around the H pipe and also ensure everything clears the crossmember for the transfer case. I think band clamps will make this a lot easier if I use them in the right areas.

GM originally used mostly single exhaust in these trucks, so there is plenty of clearance on one side and a tight fit on the other side for duals when they run above the crossmember . If I don’t get that pipe positioned right and get all the hangars in place I will have it bouncing off the crossmember every time I hit a bump.

Bruce
 
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