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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys,
i have went through the touble soaking my control arms and strut rods, as well as other assorted bare metal hardware on my 67 mustang in a phohosphirc acid and phosphate solution. As these parts came from the factory natural, I woiuld like to keep them that way but want to protect them from rust longer term than just the phosphate coating. I was intending on spraying them with rattle can VHT semi-gloss clear. Worth it or are there better methods? Don't want to do this again in a couple of years.
Thx
 

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coda618 said:
Hey guys,
i have went through the touble soaking my control arms and strut rods, as well as other assorted bare metal hardware on my 67 mustang in a phohosphirc acid and phosphate solution. As these parts came from the factory natural, I woiuld like to keep them that way but want to protect them from rust longer term than just the phosphate coating. I was intending on spraying them with rattle can VHT semi-gloss clear. Worth it or are there better methods? Don't want to do this again in a couple of years.
Thx
---------------------------------------------

Big mistake, first it will yellow and then it will peel.
Either way driven you can hope for six months to a year at best.

When I had my stangs that were restored I would after assembly wet a rag with Mobil-1 and wipe all those parts, some sat eight years like that as they were not driven.
If one was driven to show the underside was washed and re-oiled when done.

If its a driver then its a different ball game altogether, paint them or forget them.
 

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lowstreet said:
if there is a powder coating place in your town
you could get them done in clear.
This will still rust over time. It takes longer, but they will lightly rust evenly under the coating. I tried ti on a bike frame I did about a year ago. Its now orange.
 

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I have used clear powder coat on may parts and have had excellent luck. The key is in getting the part coated as quickly as possible. The bare metal starts oxidizing right away, so you have to be fast. I do my own powder coating, so i am able to minimize the time that the part is exposed. I will usually clean the part of any rust, degrease it thoroughly, then it goes into the oven to burn off any contaminates that I missed as well as any water. I coat the part as it is cooling, then right back into the oven to cure.
 

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Mag said:
I have used clear powder coat on may parts and have had excellent luck. The key is in getting the part coated as quickly as possible. The bare metal starts oxidizing right away, so you have to be fast. I do my own powder coating, so i am able to minimize the time that the part is exposed. I will usually clean the part of any rust, degrease it thoroughly, then it goes into the oven to burn off any contaminates that I missed as well as any water. I coat the part as it is cooling, then right back into the oven to cure.
can you get us some photos of the process?
 

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There is a product made by DuPont called Prime and Seal. I think the number is 2600S. It is a two part epoxy sealer/primer that comes in clear. It does have a very slight amount of gray mixed in so dont try to flow it, just a dust coat is needed. The more you put on, the darker it gets though its slight. I've used it for years now on my restorations and any dirt, oil, ect wipes off with a damp cloth 8 years later looking like the day it was done. The first time I tried it I sprayed a new floor pan I wasnt going to use for a while and put it outdoors in the weather. After a year, it looked the same without any rust. I use it on all the cast iron and newly blasted aluminum pieces to keep the natural look.
 

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I did my front and rear suspension pieces in powder silver and then a clear powder over that......came out real good....and nothing is as tough as powder paint for holding up against the elements.

I had a piece that I didn't like the way it truned out and tried to blast it with glass beads in my cabinet, all that happened was dulling the finish. the glass beads didnt even touch the powder paint beyond the dulling.





Best powder coating process is to blast it with sand or glass beads, then phosphate coat it, then powder....that is what all the big coaters do. They have a 5 stage washer set up that degreases and phosphate coats the part, finally powder coating.

My frame was done that way. When they powder coated it, it was sprayed and then sent to oven. When it came out it was shot again to get in the tight areas that the electrostatics will fight you on. They even stuck the powder gun in the frame holes to get the inside. Then baked again.

Good luck....just remember, you can't beat powder coating!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
thanks for all the suggestions guys, however, I am in the "no funds for powder coating" group of people. Any other low tech/cost solutions. This will not be a daily driver.
 

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Clean them really good (sounds like you already have). Give them a light coat of Krylons primer, and then spray them with their cast iron grey paint. Looks very close to the stock metal, and lasts surprisingly well, especially on cars not driven that often. I painted my control arms in a flat black and they still look pretty decent - just dirty.
 

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POR 15 has a product called Metal Mask that really looks good and I think they now have a clear coating for bare metal also.
 
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