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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey all,

Pretty new into Hot Rods and have never attempted something like this. I don't really have an old head to lean on and bounce ideas off around, so I am hoping some of you will be willing to help! I have a 41 Chevy Business coupe that I am "attempting" to take down to bare metal and correct body/metal work and then re-paint. At the end of the build I want a matte black finish, so the top layer on it now is what I am after. Do I have to take it down all the way to bare metal? Or just attack the problem areas like in Picture 3, fix those, and then respray the top coat?

As you can see in the pics the car has a few layers on it (picture 1). I know it's going to be a lot of work and I have a lot of time this winter so I am not worried about that. However, there HAS to be a faster way. The 2nd picture is about 14" by 8" and it took me about an hour. I put down a layer of Stripper, scrapped it off, put down another layer of Stripper, scrapped that off, then went to town with 60 grit on the DA. Please tell me I am missing an easier way to do this!!! I don't want to pull the drivetrain as it's a perfect running driving car and I don't want to mess with that, so media blasting is out. I think elbow grease and hard work are in order.

The last picture is some of the problem areas that I have on the car. Most of the top layer (I think its a Matte/Flat black primer) is in great shape, but it has a few spots like this. What's the best way to address those?

Thank you


Brown Automotive tire Road surface Wood Grey


Automotive lighting Hood Water Automotive tire Automotive design



Automotive tire Road surface Asphalt Grey Automotive exterior
 

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You say there HAS to be a faster way but you are wrong. Low gloss black screams to everyone from a great distance that theres bad bodywork on it. So just leave it alone and drive. Just my .02.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
You say there HAS to be a faster way but you are wrong. Low gloss black screams to everyone from a great distance that theres bad bodywork on it. So just leave it alone and drive. Just my .02.
I get that. But shouldn't I address the issues and fix them properly? I do metal fab for a living so I am not worried about fixing any of it. I have just never stripped a car before and want to make sure I am doing it right?

I think no matter what I need to get to the bottom of the issue areas and fix those before they become larger issues correct?
 

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Being discouraged after the first hour just doesn't indicate a real strong will. To me, I guess. But it will take that. And sure, you can address spots and spot paint those until you are ready to make it all uniform. And you can go about it in a temporary or for keeps way. I used a brush to apply epoxy primer until I was all the way around my car, then I did filler and brushed more. Then I sanded and applied epoxy over that, in a booth with a spray gun. For me, 40 grit on a DA worked best for sanding away most existing finishes. Followed by thorough DA sanding with 80 grit to clean up the metal. Stripper is something I have had only marginal success with. All I can say aside from that is you might want to eliminate the clock in your workplace. Hours can't matter on a hobby project.
 

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Check out the Eastwood Coutour. It's a grinding disk/roller with a roller on it that makes faster work of stripping. Also, there is a company called Dustless Blasting that will take your car down to metal for about $1000 the last time I checked without removing parts. This method involves caked up sand and debris that needs to be cleaned and metal has to be prepped as to not flash rust, but it doesn't have to take forever. It's just gonna cost.
I would NOT strip using a chemical stripper. They are too weak these days and so just make a mess without proper removal.

John
 
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