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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys, I am getting close to tweeding my headliner, but I need to know what kind of foam to use for puting flames under the tweed? Do I just cut out the flames and glue them the headliner, then glue the tweed to that?
 

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Discussion Starter #2
I forgot to ask, what thickness should the foam be? I really want the flames to stand out. Is 1/2 too much?
 

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First name...............Shawn
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1/4" Landau top foam, or closed cell foam. Any trim shop will have this stuff. Cut out your design, glue this to your headliner. Then glue the material onto the foam and headliner board. Work the material into the cracks/edges of the flames first, then press the tweed into place elsewhere. 1/2" would be too thick, it would be too hard to ge it to not wrinkle around the curves of the flames.
 

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Acoustic Rock ... for real.
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kristkustoms : When you say "trim shop" what do you mean? What yellow pages category would that be under?

Also, when Lay'nFrame cuts his flames pattern, he would make the cuts on a 45 degree angle - right?

Thanks

Alan Horvath
<a href="http://AlanHorvath.com/54chevy/" target="_blank">54 Chevy Pickup</a>
 

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Not quite the same thing, but after I did my headliner w/bows, I made a 'flame insert' out of eighth inch masonite, covered w/headliner foam (quarter inch), then tweeded it (spray glue) and put it up w/velcro- looks cool from front to middle of headliner and is a neat way to block off my access to overhead console stereo and gauges.
 

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First name...............Shawn
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When I say trim shop, I mean the type of place that would do anything from uphostery, sunroofs, and landau tops (fake convertible tops). In your phonebook, look up "Automotive Seat Covers, Tops, and Upholstery." At least that is what it is listed under our phonebook here.

The foam I mentioned is the same thing that is used to pad up landau tops. I actually wouldnt cut the foam at a 45 degree angle, you would lose the definition of the flames. Plus trying to cut the flames at and even 45 degrees throughout would be damn near impossible. And do yourself a favor and go get some clay modeling tools (little carved wooden sticks) from an art store. They will help work the tweed into the edges of the foam. If you use your finger, the tweed will start to burn your fingers after awhile. And a screwdriver will tear the tweed.
 

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I'm doing the exact same thing with my 67 rambler. I bought 3/8 inch thick closed cell foam and i'm going to draw the flames, cut them at a 45 degree angle, glue the foam to my headliner and then glue the material over that.
 

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Yes, horvath- ribs, then flame- also armrests are masonite covered in fiberglass and padded in flame design- I'll look up some pics, scan and post when I get time- busy now at end of semester (teacher!)
 

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Acoustic Rock ... for real.
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Lookin' forward to seeing the pics, man!
:cool:

Alan Horvath
<a href="http://AlanHorvath.com/54chevy/" target="_blank">54 Chevy Pickup</a>
 

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flames on the doors

i have a 03 Monte carlo SS but have owned severl of the older Chevy cars while we lived int ehstates I want to know wha tyou would use for flames on the door panels of the recent cars? or would i e better off air brushing them on to them due to them bing plasic anyway?
 
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