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Owner of a broken cart
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is a 153t flywheel sbc.
Mating to a 1941 ford tractor trans. (I temporarily welded 2 throwout bearings together to achieve enough reach. Not sure if it will survive. Disregard. That is what you see in the pic.)

From the bellhousing flange to the pressure plate fingers, is 1.5"
From the bellhousing flange to the face of the throwout bearing is 2.375"

That requires 0.785" of bearing travel to hit the fingers. Which I can adjust the pedal/travel distance to accomplish this.
However, the bearing falls off the end of the input shaft housing trying to travel that far. So that distance is a no go.

The input shaft housing that the throwout bearing rides on is 1.74"

The throwout bearing assembly (fork to face) measures 1.53" in thickness (front to back).

Cannot reduce bellhousing adapter thickness.

Need a thicker throwout bearing assembly (2" should work)
Or, a pressure plate with fingers that sit at 2" rather than 1.5".
Or.....?
Machine Technology Lens Camera lens Synthetic rubber
 

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Flex plate spacer on the back of the crank.
Brass pilot bearing (longer) made from a round slug of brass or found on a napa site (maybe) after a buttload of searching.

Not a big job for someone with a lathe to turn a piece of brass and make you 4 of these which you will probably loose before needing to use all of them. Buy a oversized brass rod at your local scrap yard and pay a buddy with a lathe a bit to turn it if you don't own one. Guessing you can have 3 or 4 made for less then $100.


The flex plate spacer is going to cause a starter engagement issue.

Depending on the starter I would drill "oblong" the holes and weld in drilled oblong "slugs" in the correct spot. Then the new holes will be in the correct position allowing for your now custom starter to be in the correct position. Your really not returning the starter at this point so starting with one in good condition would be advised.

You might be able to get away using oblong "inserts" to avoid welding and the bolt tension should be enough. But, generally I perfer to weld these things even with dissimilar metals. The bit of weld keeps things snug when your dealing with a high torque item like a starter.
 

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Owner of a broken cart
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461 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks. I'll keep that in mind. Hadnt thought about that route. I have a lathe.

Im trying to achieve 'off the shelf' options if at all possible.

UPDATE That diaphram pressureplate will not work. When pressing the clutch, the fingers collapse into the input shaft housing. :(
Back to the borg and beck p.p.
 

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You talk about the T.O. bearing walking off the snout of the transmission. What about the splines of the input shaft engaging enough into the clutch disc and engaging into the pilot bushing? Does that stack up of bell housing adapter plates really have to be that thick? Isn't Hot Rodding Fun?
 

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I've gone the other way several times (GM 4speed stick in a Ford). We use:
A QuickTime Ford : Chevy scattershield.
And a BRONZE pilot bushing (DON'T use brass, its too soft - PM me if you need help sourcing material, I have prints for different material but can't post them) with the Ford OD and a Chev .590 ID.
We use a GM 26 spline input shaft.
A GM 26 spline clutch disc and a FORD 26 spline pressure plate.
Throwout bearing is a GM piece or McLeod adjustable (for GM); and you modify the Ford fork slightly to fit it.

Ive done this is everything from a 69 Mustang GT, Fox Bodies and SN95s to a couple Flathead powered roadsters.

I imagine you would just do the reverse for your application. Guys have been putting toploaders behind chevy engines for ages; maybe thats a better way to research this? A proper bronze bushing can be sticking out the crank one-third of its LOA, so that may be a help. A 3-finger clutch plate will have a shorter installed height typically, than a diaphragm clutch, that may solve your stack up issue.
One of the best clutch guys in the business is Mike Norcia at Ram. He makes my job a LOT easier when we build oddball stuff.

Heres some info on the car: ESM Spartan Garage | East Syracuse Minoa High School | East Syracuse, NY
 

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Owner of a broken cart
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461 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Extend the nose on the input shaft housing , extend the TO bearing , clearance the PP fingers/ arms as necessary ..
Those are plan B options. Im trying to exhaust all 'off the shelf' options first. This build will be documented and supplied as instructions for future kits.
I basically have my own machine shop, so mod'ing anything isnt a problem. Im mainly just picking yalls brains for off the shelf parts/solutions (if they exist) for now.
 

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Owner of a broken cart
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461 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
You talk about the T.O. bearing walking off the snout of the transmission. What about the splines of the input shaft engaging enough into the clutch disc and engaging into the pilot bushing? Does that stack up of bell housing adapter plates really have to be that thick? Isn't Hot Rodding Fun?
All those things check out fine. The tractors p.p. has a pretty tall hat height.
 

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Owner of a broken cart
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461 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I've gone the other way several times (GM 4speed stick in a Ford). We use:
A QuickTime Ford : Chevy scattershield.
And a BRONZE pilot bushing (DON'T use brass, its too soft - PM me if you need help sourcing material, I have prints for different material but can't post them) with the Ford OD and a Chev .590 ID.
We use a GM 26 spline input shaft.
A GM 26 spline clutch disc and a FORD 26 spline pressure plate.
Throwout bearing is a GM piece or McLeod adjustable (for GM); and you modify the Ford fork slightly to fit it.

Ive done this is everything from a 69 Mustang GT, Fox Bodies and SN95s to a couple Flathead powered roadsters.

I imagine you would just do the reverse for your application. Guys have been putting toploaders behind chevy engines for ages; maybe thats a better way to research this? A proper bronze bushing can be sticking out the crank one-third of its LOA, so that may be a help. A 3-finger clutch plate will have a shorter installed height typically, than a diaphragm clutch, that may solve your stack up issue.
One of the best clutch guys in the business is Mike Norcia at Ram. He makes my job a LOT easier when we build oddball stuff.

Heres some info on the car: ESM Spartan Garage | East Syracuse Minoa High School | East Syracuse, NY
Thank you, i'll PM you in a bit.
The tractors input shaft is 1-3/8"
I doubt I can swap a GM passenger car input shaft into a 1942 Ford tractor.
I will look into that McLeod adjustable throwout bearing. I called Novak, and they dont have one in 1.75" ID
 

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I've gone the other way several times (GM 4speed stick in a Ford). We use:
A QuickTime Ford : Chevy scattershield.
And a BRONZE pilot bushing (DON'T use brass, its too soft - PM me if you need help sourcing material, I have prints for different material but can't post them) with the Ford OD and a Chev .590 ID.
We use a GM 26 spline input shaft.
A GM 26 spline clutch disc and a FORD 26 spline pressure plate.
Throwout bearing is a GM piece or McLeod adjustable (for GM); and you modify the Ford fork slightly to fit it.

Ive done this is everything from a 69 Mustang GT, Fox Bodies and SN95s to a couple Flathead powered roadsters.

I imagine you would just do the reverse for your application. Guys have been putting toploaders behind chevy engines for ages; maybe thats a better way to research this? A proper bronze bushing can be sticking out the crank one-third of its LOA, so that may be a help. A 3-finger clutch plate will have a shorter installed height typically, than a diaphragm clutch, that may solve your stack up issue.
One of the best clutch guys in the business is Mike Norcia at Ram. He makes my job a LOT easier when we build oddball stuff.

Heres some info on the car: ESM Spartan Garage | East Syracuse Minoa High School | East Syracuse, NY
WTF is a " ford 26 spline pressure plate , didn't know a pressure plate had splines ??
 

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First, I keep hearing "flexplate" instead of flywheel.....is that just a mis-statement? Second, while extended pilot bearings can help somewhat, if there is room for the throwout bearing to slip off, thats way too much distance for a pilot bearing to compensate. Back up a little and start with your input shaft at the correct length to engage the pilot bearing. Thats the first thing you need to do. You can check and see if any similar transmissions may have a longer input shaft you can swap, but thats where you need to start. Then it looks like the trans has basically a built in bellhousing. You might want to look into a smaller multi disc clutch that can fit into that housing. You can't just extend the pilot bearing to make up the distance as it will not provide good support when torque is thrown at it, and it may interfere with clutch movement.
 
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